Ethanol in our fuel



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    wheeliebin's Avatar
    wheeliebin is offline Golam Rosewater
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    Ethanol in our fuel

    I don't know if everyone is aware or not, but in the UK nearly all our petrol we buy in the UK has at least 5% ethanol in it. It was going to go upto 10% for 2013 but has been delayed.

    I was talking with a bike racer/tuner today that was telling me that people are starting to see problems with it.

    It's said that it goes 'off' a lot quicker, as little as 90 days. It 'wicks' water, bit like brake fluid does. It can 'change' the results of a plug chop ( I didn't understand this ), so proper engine management is more important. It can rot rubber, fibreglass, etc and can have an effect on laying our bikes up for the winter.

    Helps the environment though

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    Re: Ethanol in our fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by wheeliebin View Post
    I don't know if everyone is aware or not, but in the UK nearly all our petrol we buy in the UK has at least 5% ethanol in it. It was going to go upto 10% for 2013 but has been delayed.

    I was talking with a bike racer/tuner today that was telling me that people are starting to see problems with it.

    It's said that it goes 'off' a lot quicker, as little as 90 days. It 'wicks' water, bit like brake fluid does. It can 'change' the results of a plug chop ( I didn't understand this ), so proper engine management is more important. It can rot rubber, fibreglass, etc and can have an effect on laying our bikes up for the winter.

    Helps the environment though
    strange how people worry about there bikes but not there cars. shouldnt make any difference on winter lay up if you run the bike turncthe fuel off and allow it stop naturally or failing that dont lay it up and keep riding it
    HONDA VARADERO 99. NWS HUGGER, SCOTTOILER, HARD WIRED GPS, HEADLIGHT PROTECTOR, HEPCO @ BECKER LUGGAGE, GIVI CRASHBARS, GIVI TOP BOX, AUDICATOR BRAKE TEXT UNIT


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    Re: Ethanol in our fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by wheeliebin View Post
    It can 'change' the results of a plug chop ( I didn't understand this ),
    The classic plug chop hasn't been the same since they stopped putting lead in, anyway...
    Michel -- '92 R100GS PD -- Our Lady of Blessed Acceleration, don't fail me now!

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    wheeliebin's Avatar
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    Re: Ethanol in our fuel

    Just another scare story then

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    Dougie is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Ethanol in our fuel

    This is a real problem.

    There have been problems also with nylon tanks swelling and not fitting anymore ( 10% in USA) and classic bike carbs can have internal corrosion of metal parts.

    The fuel can 'separate' and form water inside a stored tank, rubber parts /seals can break down. ETC etc......

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    Re: Ethanol in our fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by Dougie View Post
    This is a real problem.

    There have been problems also with nylon tanks swelling and not fitting anymore ( 10% in USA) and classic bike carbs can have internal corrosion of metal parts.

    The fuel can 'separate' and form water inside a stored tank, rubber parts /seals can break down. ETC etc......
    I heard and read all these scare stories before, but i have not yet ever met anyone in real life who's witnessed it or had it happen to them
    HONDA VARADERO 99. NWS HUGGER, SCOTTOILER, HARD WIRED GPS, HEADLIGHT PROTECTOR, HEPCO @ BECKER LUGGAGE, GIVI CRASHBARS, GIVI TOP BOX, AUDICATOR BRAKE TEXT UNIT


    GASGAS EC300 2006

    MITSUBISHI L200 WARRIOR 2004 IN BLACK

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    Mahout is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Ethanol in our fuel

    I experienced it on a CX500 where I installed new fuel lines and then ran it on optimax (super unleaded has more ethanol than normal 95 octane), the fuel lines expanded and I had to replace them. Went back to normal 95 octane and no problems. Have also heard from other Elefant owners with Acerbis polyamide 6 fuel tanks that have experienced fuel tanks expanding when in storage off the bike and then having clearance problems when refitted. Best advice is drain the tank if its being laid up to remove any water.


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    Re: Ethanol in our fuel

    Its a pity that Aspen petrol is not affordable, no probs there AFAIAA!!

    Aspen Fuel :: Aspen v Premium Unleaded

    I use this in my Coleman stove, cheaper than Coleman fuel and a MUCH nicer smell than burning unleaded
    steveR

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    Re: Ethanol in our fuel

    I carry a half litre of Aspen in one of my tool tubes to use in my Coleman, but if I run out of petrol..............



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    Dougie is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Ethanol in our fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonbc View Post
    I heard and read all these scare stories before, but i have not yet ever met anyone in real life who's witnessed it or had it happen to them
    This is understandable Jason as the current level is 5%. To meet someone you would have to be in the USA or be a automotive researcher and problems become more apparent at a level of 10%.

    This came up on other forums and I looked into it a bit. There was an extensive report carried in the UK commissioned by the Government to the Department of Transport.

    I never included the link but with a bit of searching I'm sure you could find it.

    This was taken from a report commissioned for the UK Government into the effects of increased ethanol in vehicles.
    Some other interesting parts of the report are listed below.
    Due to the problems E10 fuel has been postponed in Germany.

    "Unfortunately it is known from field experience that E10 blends can severely corrode aluminium components, leading to catastrophic failure [46]. Also carbon steel can suffer severe corrosive attack if the fuel contains water [37]. Brass components in carburettors are known to corrode when exposed to E10 [23]. "

    "•
    Triumph, all Triumph motorcycles have been compatible with E10 since at least 1994. From 1993 to 2008 nylon moulded fuel tanks were employed but due to vapour permeability concerns a switch back to steel tanks was made [96].

    BMW. BMW motorcycles have been E10 compatible for at least twenty years [107].

    Harley-Davidson. All motorcycles have been E10 compatible since the 90s [108].

    Kawasaki. Kawasaki Heavy Industries are still considering the effects of E10 and do not recommend its use [109].

    KTM. All models from 2000 are compatible with E10 [110].

    Yamaha. All models are compatible with E5 and some new models are compatible with E10 [111].

    Suzuki. All models have been compatible with E10 since 2005 [112].

    Honda. All models have been compatible with E10 since 1993 but carburettored vehicles could suffer poor drivability [164, 165]." 

    "It is widely accepted that vehicles ten years old and older will not be compatible with E10 blends, though of course there will be exceptions to this. There are approximately nine million petrol passenger cars and light duty petrol vehicles in the UK that are ten years old or older, this equates to about 38% of the total petrol vehicle parc [116]. In addition to these vehicles there are thousands of relatively new first generation petrol direct injection vehicles in the UK, the last new vehicle probably being sold in 2007, that are not compatible with E10. "

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