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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a 2003 650 transalp, its done about 30,000 miles.

There's play in the swingarm, about 6-8mm of play at the back end. I notice it when cornering, now that I know to expect it I am no longer frightened when I feel the rear wheel move across unexpectedly. However, its not good, I want to fix that.

I'm guessing that the swingarm bearings are shot and need replaced.

First set of questions
: Is that right, do they need replaced or is there an adjustment that can be performed to remove this play? Is there a grease nipple which can be used to pump grease into these bearings (various of my older bikes had this, but I notice modern bikes are less helpful by not having them)

If I'm replacing them, I'll do all the suspension and swingarm bearings in one hit.

I last replaced a set of swingarm bearings about 16 years ago, on an aircooled GPz750. They were very badly seized in, the task involved an awful lot of heating with blowtorch, hitting with very big hammers, and for one bearing the outer cage of the needle roller had to be cut out using a dremmel. It was a pig of a job, and involved fair degree of swearing too.

I don't own a garage, However I have the use of a well kitted out garage for a month when a friend is on holiday in Europe (I'm a Brit living in Australia). So with only a month of garage use I want to research and plan the job so that I'm finished before he returns.

Second set of questions: Has anyone done it before? I only have the Haynes manual to follow, is there a better manual available? does the Haynes get something wrong (I have had reason to refer to it as the "Haynes book of lies" for some of my 70's bikes, but they have been better in more recent years).
Are the genuine Honda bearings the ones to use? or are they simply standard bearings which I can obtain from a bearing factors at a third the price of Honda? Or is there an upgrade kit available?
Do I need any special tools?

Lastly: Opportunities for any upgrades whilst I have it apart
Is it worth fitting a different swingarm altogether? Is there a better one from a differnt model or an aftermarket one?
Has anybody fitted grease nipples? with everything apart I can drill and tap a 6mm thread to install grease nipples, if anyone's done it before photos of where they installed them would be appreciated.

Any wisdom and experience from those who have already done it is gratefully received.

thanks
 

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Hi Chris..

Is it actually the swing arm bearings? have you taken the back wheel out and with bike weight off the swingarm..centre stand or crate and check for free play that way..there is a little free play up and down a std 2mm approx..I thought mine had gone but it was the rear wheel bearings..

A few have done the swingarm bearing ..sodd of a job and you can tap and die to add a grease nipple...well worth it as Honda dont add much grease in a s std...shame on them..mines a 2004 with 55k and no bearing fault yet just wheel bearings..


I`d do a search on google for transalp rear swing arm bearings as it always links to this site as our search engine sucks..

I know the xrv alloy swing arm wont fit the 650 but will fit the 600...shame as I`d like one..
 

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First - There is no adjustment, so it's replacement. No grease nipples either, but you could install some.

Second - Did it last year (see below). Cannot remember any mistakes in the Haynes, though I do have the Honda Workshop manual. I got my bearings from a bearing factors.

Third - Don't know of any upgrades, though someone else might.


The only difficulty I had when I ended up changing the swingarm bearings was removing the exhaust. This was on my 2004 650 Transalp, last year. The exhaust sub-chamber (it is NOT a catalytic converter!) gets in the way of access to the lower shock mount and dog-bone linkage.

There are no special bearings in the swingarm or linkage, I found mine from a bearing factors. I can dig out the numbers if you like.

I only ended up doing mine as I found a damaged seal when I removed the swingarm to replace the shock. Details of what I found here.

Hope that's some help to you.

Tony



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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Tony,

Your advice thread looks very useful

If the bearing numbers are easy for you to obtain I'd appreciate it. I have limited garage time so I plan to buy/order all as much as I can before starting so that I'm not held up waiiting a week for parts to arrive.

getting the Honda workshop manual seems like a good idea. Where can one be purchased? or is there a downloadable and printable one?
 

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As I recall, there are a pair of single ball bearings on the rhs & a needle bearing on the lhs. Every swingarm that I have stripped out of a 650 had some corrosion starting in the rhs bearing - there's obviously somwehere for water ingress.

Personally, I'd replace the open ball races for sealed type (packed with a little extra grease :thumbup:).
As Lutin says they are just stock off the shelf items (can't speak for the needle bearing as I've never had to replace one)

Phil
 

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Conversely to what Phil said above, I found the LHS needle bearing had suffered from water ingress due to a damaged seal - that must have happened when the bike was built. :( The RHS ball bearings were fine - but I changed them anyway.

Right, the swingarm itself and associated gubbins -

View attachment 23347


The LHS needle bearing is a TA2530Z, sized 25x33x30. That's IDxODxWidth. Or in English - Inside Diameter x Outside Diameter x width. Original Honda Part Number is 91071-MT7-003, which is item 20 on the drawing.

The RHS ball bearings are 6003's, sized 17x35x10. I used sealed bearings as Phil mentioned, the part number will then be 60032RSR - the "2RSR" denoting a bearing with two rubber seals. Original Honda Part Number is 96100-600-3010, which are shown as 30 on the diagram.

If you need to renew the seals, they are -

LHS there are two dust seals sized 25x33x4. The original Honda Part Number is 91202-MAL-601. You could easily fit wider seals as there is lots of room, which you will find when you have a look yourself. Items marked 21 on the diagram.

On the RHS there are two different sized seals -

Item marked 22 is called an Oil Seal and is sized 25x31x3.5, the original Honda Part Number is 91203-GC8-003.

Item marked 23 is called a Dust Seal and is sized 23x35x5, the original Honda Part Number is 91214-MAL-601.

There is no room to fit wider seals here, as you will see for yourself.



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And now onto the Shock Linkage and associated gubbins -

View attachment 23348

I didn't have to replace any bearings here as they were all fine, just one seal that was a bit iffy. But since I'm blethering anyway, here's all the details that you might need -

There are three sizes of needle bearings used here -

1) Item marked 17, sized 17x24x17, original Honda Part Number 91071-MY1-005.

2) Items marked 18, sized 20x26x20, original Honda Part Number 91072MY1-005.

3) Items marked 16, sized 17x24x25 (I think, but please check), original Honda Part Number 91071-KV3-005.

There are two sizes of seals used -

1) Items marked 21, sized 17x24x5, original Honda Part Number 91262-KV3831.

2) Items marked 20, sized 20x26x5, original Honda Part Number 91254-KS6-005.

That should keep you going for a bit. :D

Edit: Since my linkage bearings were fine I just washed them out in paraffin without removing them - no need to go disturning stuff that doesn't need disturbing. A toothbrush comes in handy here. Wash again in clean paraffin and then finally clean out the paraffin with some good degreaser and allow to dry completely before loading with new, clean grease when re-assembling.



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And since you might well have to remove the exhaust system - it really does make removing and refitting the shock, linkage and swingarm much easier - here's the bits you might need -

View attachment 23349


There are four seals used in the complete system. Two are copper crush seals (exhaust port connections in the heads) and two are graphite sleeves that connect the system together.

The two copper crush seals are different sizes for front and rear, these will need replacing -

Item 1 - Front, original Honda Part Number 18291-MM5-860.

Item 2 - Rear, original Honda Part Number 18291-MN4-920.


The two graphite sleeve seals are -

Item 14, original Honda Part Number 18391-MAW-791.

Item 15, original Honda Part Number 18392-MJ4-670.

You could well get away with re-using these as it all depends on how difficult it is to dismantle the exhaust system.



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Oh, and before you do anything to the bike give it a damn good clean. You'll do doubt find loads of dried on chain lube and associated road debris liberally plastered all over the under side of the LHS of the swingarm and frame. It makes the job so much nicer to do if nothing else.
Top work Tony, right up up to the point when you mentioned cleaning the bike at which point you lost me :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
good news! my swingarm bearings are fine. The knock I felt is in the linkage, the wishbone? the bit with 3 sets of needle rollers.

However, this gives a new dilemma, do I replace everything whilst I have the chance (I don't own a garage rememember), or just do the needle rollers in the one linkage.

The bike has done about 28-30 thousand miles, is that a lot for a set of swingarm bearings, or do they usually last twice that distance?
 

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Assuming they don't get water/dirt in them they last ages, if repacked with grease occasionally, should see the bike out.

Maybe the heat from the subchamber dries the grease on standard bikes?

Phil
 

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