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Hi Fitz,

I note you mention you removed the nuts and allen bolts holding the rear sprocket and these were simple enough as you had removed them before. Did you just use a simple spanner and allen key? I have a spare wheel ad tried my spanner on there but its rounding the nuts. I have ordered a snap on six point spanner so hopefully that will work. I know from when I did my front disc the similar nuts were a pain. I couldn't get a socket to fit, unless you did I guess it the spanner method?

I have the chain on order as per your link but for my year of bike. I assume the chain kit comes with the link part?

Was the front sprocket easy enough to remove?

Thanks

Jamie
 

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Just done the FX... front sprocket came off easily - the bolts should not be that tight and with all the oily mess in there hardly get a chance to rust. For the rear sprocket I used Allen head socket and t-bar with open ended spanner just holding the nut.
Got the entire kit from Bike Torque Racing (AFAM sprockets and Gold DID chain with link) Put new sprocket plate on too.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
Hi Jamie,

I hate Allen Keys and try to avoid using them for anything requiring more turning force than flat-pack furniture assembly! I had the right size Allen head in my socket set so used that with the ratchet handle. Then just a normal spanner on the nuts at the rear. A ring spanner is always a safer bet than open-ended, in my opinion, if you have room to get it on square. And the turning effort should be on the nut, you're really just holding the the bolt to stop it spinning.

Front sprocket bolts x2 were surprisingly (shockingly, even) easy to undo. Then just some gentle persuasion to get the washer off, after which the sprocket itself pulls straight off with no effort.

Your new chain should have the soft link included.

If you need to stock up on tools, keep an eye open for the Halfords Professional range. Really good quality, and every 15 minutes there's some kind of sale or another, often half "list" price.

I got this one:
Halfords Advanced Professional 170...
... currently "half-price" at £125, I think I paid about £100 but that was two years ago.
 

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Hi Guys,

While doing my 2k oil change routine at the weekend I noticed the chain was looking rather saggy. I thought I would tighten it a bit until I get around to sorting the replacement chain. I’m a bit shocked to find out the adjusters seem to be as tight as they will go and the chain is still very loose. I’m sure this means I need to change the chain as a matter of urgency.

I already have the chain and sprockets, I have ordered a chain tool today. I’m on holiday at the end of the week so looking at sorting when I return.

Is the bike going to kill me in the meantime with a saggy chain?

The new chain has exactly the same number of links and even seems to be the exact type, brand etc as the one on the bike. Has the chain just stretched or worn or whatever they do over time or have the adjusters somehow failed? I have tried looking at pics on the net to see how others are adjusted but obviously not something that there is many pictures of.

Just checking if there is something else that could be wrong here that I may need to get ordered?
 

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Chain maintenance - Sprockets Unlimited> Chainmaintenance

Replace pronto and careful in the meantime that the chain doesn't jump off the sprockets / break damaging engine casings / locking the rear wheel.

How often do you do chain care?
 

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I clean a lube the chain every few weeks. Probably more in the wet. I'm going away on the 30th so will look to do it on the 8th when I am back. I will take it easy in the meantime. So you think the adjusters will be OK?
 

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Ideally why don't you replace C&S as soon as possible - it only takes an hour or so.

"...excessively slack chains are submitted to violent whipping during acceleration and deceleration and additional loading is put on the chain. A slack chain could jump off the sprockets causing serious damage and injury."

 

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I have the chain tool on order, as soon as it arrives I will replace the chain. In meantime I will take it easy. I fly on the 30th so by the time I get the tool it will likely be used when I return. At least then I can take my time and not get in a flap.
 

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Well I have now fitted a new chain, plus front and rear sprockets to my bike. Thanks to Fitz for this thread which was very helpful. I ordered all the bits plus chain tool from Wemoto. Bit of a nightmare this morning trying to buy a Dremel but finally got one in the end. Apparently not every B&Q stocks them! Thanks to Argos I now have one.
 

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Yay finally I might be able to offer some advice :p

Not sure of your last sentence, but I ordered:

Honda NX 650 T Dominator RD08 (Nissin Front Caliper) 96 DID Chain and JT Sprocket Kit Parts at Wemoto - The UK's No.1 On-Line Motorcycle Parts Retailer

Honda NX 650 T Dominator RD08 (Nissin Front Caliper) 96 Chain Riveter Parts at Wemoto - The UK's No.1 On-Line Motorcycle Parts Retailer

I cant compare the chain tool to others but it worked well for me. I have never changed a motorcycle chain before but read this thread a hundred times and watched hours of you tube. I'm still alive (at time of writing) and the job was a good one. I measured the old rivets before cutting the chain off and then made sure the new ones were the same and the link was free moving.

Very happy.
 

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Thanks for the links.

It is actually for my AT RD07 so I need a tool for a 525 chain, a bit bigger than the Dommy one.

The design of the riveter in the link I put is different, as you can see. it looks better to me.

But maybe I am just talking rubbish and any quality riveter is fine.

Thanks for pointing me to Wemoto, their section on chain riveters is really interesting.

This seems to me good quality (slightly cheaper version on Ebay)

Professional Chain Braking/Riveting Kit | eBay
 

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Hi ! Had a quick search, but couldn't find anything related to this, so here goes ... 1) Any of you guys recommend tools for measuring wear on both the chain and sprockets ? (all I could find were one's for bicycles). 2) I'm thinking a spring link would be OK for a XV650VY that isn't thrashed, and only does an average of 2500kms a year, in a 6 month window. I live in Isfjorden, Norway and need to visit Nordkapp at least once in my life (Now 60 and feeling it) :grin: Too much on this year, but defo next year if all my limbs work. Thanks !
 

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If you can pull the chain away from the rear sprocket its a sign that chain is shagged, plus the chain adjustment indicators will give a forewarning. Best replace chain and sprocket as a set, and use a HD O'ring / X'ring chain and best use the supplied rivet NOT spring link.

Watch this to see an extreme case of getting max use of C&S on the road... (12.35)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky4i4Y6b--c
 

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I found useful this, to check the right tension

ATiC - Honda Africa Twin Homepage

Then you can keep the chain until you can keep it in the right tension, after adjustments.
The only problems are 'knots', an indicator of wear.

I use Wurth chain lubricant, not cheap, but keep the chain clean and long-lasting, reducing knots formation.

When you change chain you change sprockets.
For the front one, as Honda shaft is not of great quality (for ATs), I use Honda original. MUCH better than any other.
 

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I found useful this, to check the right tension

ATiC - Honda Africa Twin Homepage

Then you can keep the chain until you can keep it in the right tension, after adjustments.
The only problems are 'knots', an indicator of wear.

I use Wurth chain lubricant, not cheap, but keep the chain clean and long-lasting, reducing knots formation.

When you change chain you change sprockets.
For the front one, as Honda shaft is not of great quality (for ATs), I use Honda original. MUCH better than any other.
Am i right in assuming he set the correct freeplay at 30-40mm when the suspension is pushed up to where the chain would be tightest, because when the chain is at its tightest position on the suspension travel in theory you don't need any free play at all because the chain cant get any tighter only slacker so not sure if the slack at rest is correct it looks excessively slack to me
 

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Just a quick point...
The OP was looking at grinding the head off the chain rivets - common practice I know.

I on the other hand do something so easy you wouldn't believe.

Once I've made sure the front sprocket nut(s) are loose and I no longer require the chain to be on the bike I get out my ancient bolt cutters and bite straight through one side plate then the other. Total time 10 seconds.

Bugger this grind the heads off and push the pins through.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Just a quick point...
The OP was looking at grinding the head off the chain rivets - common practice I know.

I on the other hand do something so easy you wouldn't believe.

Once I've made sure the front sprocket nut(s) are loose and I no longer require the chain to be on the bike I get out my ancient bolt cutters and bite straight through one side plate then the other. Total time 10 seconds.

Bugger this grind the heads off and push the pins through.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
I am that OP! Yes, plan A was to grind off the heads and push out the pins to get the chain off. However once it became clear my chain tool wasn’t up to the job of pushing out the old pins, I resorted to an angle grinder straight through the side plates.

I guess the logic is that by pulling the pins we can link new chain to old and pull through to thread the new chain onto the sprockets. But if we’re not planning to re-use the old chain (and isn’t that why we bought a new one in the first place?!) and we have easy access to both sprockets (and again, if we’re replacing both, it has to be assumed we *have* ), then why not just cut through the old chain and save time...




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