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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I mate managed to over torque the bolts for the rear Wheel.
As a result a series of cracks developed around the lugs.
See Pictures:

https://picasaweb.google.com/113853469416499694662/BMWF800GSTrophy2012#slideshow/5910622668680761010

https://picasaweb.google.com/113853469416499694662/BMWF800GSTrophy2012#slideshow/5910622629691799730

https://picasaweb.google.com/113853469416499694662/BMWF800GSTrophy2012#slideshow/5910618919703351986

Anyone Heard of if this fault can be repaired?

A new hub from BMW is expensive...

Edit: Fixed links so that pictures shows
 

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Bloody furriner
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The links don't work.

If that's damage to the wheel side, I'd look for a second hand wheel. Still won't be cheap, but there's bound to be some out there and it sure beats dealer prices.

If it's damage to the shaft side... Dunno about those. I am left to wonder how you overtorque those bolts, they go on at about 100 Nm, don't they? Air tools, I guess.
 

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If this is the flange thats cracked (not uncommon) it can be replaced independently of the final drive. I even understand BMW did some goodwill replacements so worth asking.
 

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I'd replace it.

It may be possible to have it built up with weld then machined back again, but really not worth risking in the long run and wouldn't be a cheap job to do. It looks rather under-engineered - probably fine at sensible torque though.
 

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Only 70% extra! That's nearly double. Doh!

Time to read the manual to avoid any further expensive mistakes. He could also buy some ACF50 and paint the nipples. That should halt the corrosion. Filthy neglected bike ;)
 

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I agree with the above, buy a new wheel (hub). When I bought my F8 I bought a torque wrench, I even un did the rear axle and retorqued it after having new tyres fitted.


Sent using Stumps.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
He actually used a proper torque wrench of the click type, but he misread it and did not see that it was in ibf and not nm, (or vice versa).
So he did cross tighten it, with lightly lubed bolts, gradually tighten the bolts with higher and higher torque up to the right spec.
But did not catch that it was the wrong scale on the wrench.

Alan, the bike is recently imported from the UK so corrosion on bolts, wheels and engine castings is sadly to be expected. :D
 

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He actually used a proper torque wrench of the click type, but he misread it and did not see that it was in ibf and not nm
Ah, I see. So it was accurately torqued to the wrong torque :D However, that would mean it was no more than 35% above the intended torque.

Maybe the torque spec is for a dry thread. Oiling or greasing the thread will increase clamping force for the same torque which will mean you effectively overtighten the bolt. If it says use grease or oil on the threads in the manual, use it. If it doesn't then don't.
 

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Wheel fitters are notorious for over torquing wheels and I've seen some crazy tightening without causing this sort of damage. Are you sure your mate caused this with what was not a lot of over torquing and not some previous fitter armed with a windy gun.

For info the reprom doesn't mention wet or dry torque but I always give the bolts a smear of antisieze and every BMW I've ever seen has that silver antisieze that BMW are so keen on on the bolts.
 

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SHW'MAE BUTT
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Boris; said:
I always give the bolts a smear of antisieze and every BMW I've ever seen has that silver antisieze that BMW are so keen on on the bolts.
The white anti friction grease is to stop incorrect torque readings off the mating surfaces and allows the threads to pulled up correctly.
And the hub is fooked, that a mechanical term.
 
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