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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

As some of you will know, I'm having to take my RD04 to pieces to change a collapsed countershaft bearing, so, as promised, here's how it's going. First off, a little background.

One day, a few years ago, I became aware that my rear brake was no longer working ... in true style, I pushed on with my journey without giving it too much thought. On arriving home, I became aware that my left leg was covered with oil, as well as the bike. This turned out to be coming from a failed oil seal inboard of the front sprocket.

Not being so mechanically minded in those days, the bike was duly sent off to the local dealer for the requisite surgery - 'uh oh', said the mechanic, 'you need a new bearing too - that's an engine out, engine apart, and gearbox apart job' - estimated to cost aroun £2,000. Not best pleased, the bike was sent back home in disgrace, where it propped up a side wall for the next 2 years.

Anyway, having got fed up with it sitting about being useless, I've decided to get on with the job myself.

So far then:

1) Do not leave your bike outside for 2 years - it becomes a complete sod to move.
2) leaving bike outside for 2 years does not do much good for the nuts and bolts.
3) Finally managed to get side rear offside panel off - nearside still won't undo, so I might feel the need to use the drill.
4) side panels and fuel tank off
5) Carbs off - had to break the retaining clips, as these were seized. Complete sod to squeeze between engine and frame without completely destroying the paintwor.
5) Exhaust eventually off - one bolt on the front pipe required removal with a hammer and cold chisel - strangely satisfying
6) Oil out, coolant out, horn off, and anything else that I could get to off.
7) Tea.

Next job will be to remove the swingarm, then the engine will be ready to come out (I think). Tricky part this (ie how to keep the bike upright with no centrestand and no rear wheel - bear in mind that you need to have access to the bottom of the engine, so beaching it is not an option) - Health and Safety guidelines are definately not in force in my garage.

Next update next week.
 

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Its Me again,

I forgot to say one of the carb clips has a hex head, that is the one nearest the carb.

Also when the engine is removed the swinging arm needs to be pulled backwards, towards the number plate,

Tut tut I have a XRV750-W. so there might be some conflict.

ps

my rebuild is going all ok :roll:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Right - it's out.

A bit of an awkward devil - I'm not really sure how you're supposed to be able to remove the engine without removing half of the paintwork on the frame tho.

Not much of interest to note ... only one bolt sheared off (I deem it non-essential, so it can stay that way) - three cheers for my large torque wrench - came in very handy when maximum leverage is called for.

The problem of supporting the bike with the rear swingarm loosened was to place the frame on axle stands - not ideal, but it beats the pile of bricks that I used the first time around (don't try that one at home, kids).

As the engine was loosened, I found it easier to withdraw some of the large (ie long) bolts by jacking the engine up slightly, so as to ease the pressure.

Oh, and when you drain the coolant, make sure you undo the lower hose - I managed to coat my floor, my tools and myself in an interesting water/antifreeze mix - I only remembered that I suffered the same fate last time around when it was too late.

Job seemed slightly easier the 2nd time around - less daunting, maybe, but now I'm into unchartered territory....

Next steps:

Clean/degrease engine casing prior to dismantle;
Clean up garage - locate sockets, nuts and bolts etc;
Make a space for dismantling the engine;
Assess the amount of rust on the bike frame, treat, and apply a new coat of paint.
 

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Wait untill you undo the flywheel nut [L/H thread] and the clutch nut, :p
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Oh dear - more hidden horrors awaiting me then? What's the problem with them - are they tight, or impossible to get to?
 

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The clutch centre nut is best undone with the engine in frame and the rear wheel in so that you can engage 5th gear and stand on the rear brake. However it sounds a bit late for that. Whatever you do don't use the clutch spring posts to hold the clutch whilst you undo the nut. I did and snapped two. I used a tool just like it shows you in the Haynes manual. I've stopped crying now 6 months later.

Ian
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Oh. You're right - it's no longer in the frame, and there's no way it's going back in until it's ready to run!

Oh well - I won't be doing much more on it for a few days, as I'm still celebrating my victory at getting the engine out in the first place! Managed to do it without breaking my back this time too!

Will cross the clutch bridge when I come to it ...

Any other hidden treasures to look out for??
 

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Yes the cost of a full gasket set. not far off £200 :shock:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Next problem

Right - I've got the engine partially stripped, and now I've bumped into the Crankshaft bolt problem.

With the engine out of the bike, how on earth do I undo this, as the engine now turns whenever I try to turn the bolt. Is there a safe way to 'jam' the engine?
 

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Left or Right side ?
If it is the Generator side you will nee a strap wrench on the fly wheel. Mine is crap I had to borrow one from work. the torque is 130 Nm [from the top of my head] Dont forget the thread is L/H.

Dont take this as Gospel as I am tired and had a few drinks......
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It's the generator side - sounds like I've got something on the clutch side to look forward to then.

I feel a trip to Halfrauds coming on, as I don't have a strap wrench (and am not sure what one is!).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hello, everyone!

Haven't been here for ages, but I have been working on the engine rebuild (although the work did stall for a couple of months).

I'm pleased to report that the engine is now bolted back together - the countershaft bearing was indeed knackered, but all other bearings seemed fine, so the engine strip was required just to change one £8 part. Oh well.

I haven't put the engine back in the frame yet - may prepare for that little bit of fun tonight, as I'd like to see whether it runs. I have turned it over by hand, and there weren't any nasty metal on metal noises, so hopefully the timing is there or thereabouts. There is quite alot of squeeze and suck noise, but as the spark plugs are still present, I'm hoping that this is merely proving that the engine still has some compression.

I must admit that I'll be amazed if it all goes properly - I'm a bit concerned that I was a bit feeble when sealing the two halves of the engine casing - I really would rather avoid having to dismantle it all, just to fill it with sealing compound. I guess I'll see.

Now, I've got to try to remember which engine mount goes where etc, as the Honda workshop manual is rubbish, in my opinion. There are a couple of bits that broke/disintegrated when dismantling, so I'll see if I can remember what they are, instead of having to do some work.

Oh, and the exhaust is a complete gonner - anyone got a serviceable RD04 exhaust that they don't want?

Cheers.
 

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Need Constant Supervision
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Sorry to say mate but this is very entertaining reading matter :D

Please don't see it as me having a laugh on your behalf but just the way you have encountered things and got on with the job could of been myself. The moment I touch a spanner everthing that can go wrong already did. Now the fact that I was in a technical school and have a father that got me to work on engines and cars since the age of 8 somehow did not cure my ten thumb syndrome.

The last time I took my bike's gearbox out to repalce a clutch plate I had to do it three times. :oops:

First attempt got everthing out and started re-assembling stuff. After I torqued the final gearbox bolt looked down only to see the freakin clutch pushrod and diahram plate lying neatly bewteen my legs :shock:

Took the gearbox out again and somehow between myself and my cousin we dropped the diahram plate with the assembly and hastly stuck it back with one hand. To my horror after assembling everthing up to the tank bolts when I pulled the clutch in there was nothing - guessed it? Yep we stuck the diahram plate in the wrong way around. :x

By now I was not impressed and was walking around mumbling things about petrol and matches etc :?

Third time lucky and got everthing sorted - about bloody time! This was on my 1100GS. I started to work on the AT now and there is so much freakin rusted bolts that I cringe everytime I start loosening one to get to something. I can see loads of work ahead with easy out's. Do youself a favour and put some copper grease on all the bolts you screw back.

Good luck and keep the report coming!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Maverick,

You're more than welcome to laugh at my expense, and I'm pleased you find it interesting.

Yep, all those rusted nuts and bolts, plus the waste of time manual make the job ten times harder, but I'm not complaining - it's all a learning curve, and I'll get immense satisfaction once it is running again.

If I hadn't decided to do the work, then the bike would have been sold as a non-runner, so hopefully I'll be keeping another AT on the road!

Watch this space for the next disaster!
 

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Hurry up and build the AT or the rebuilt bits will be rusty. I still have to fit my belly guard [still showing off my new down pipes] and the crash bars are not fitted.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm going as fast as I can ... the only problem is that I have 1 little part left over, which I think came from the engine somewhere (possibly something to do with the clutch mechanism ....

It's a small roller (metal, obviously - cylindrical) - about 15mm long, and 3mm radius (or could be diameter/circumference - math's was a long time ago).

Any ideas what it might be from?! It's possible that it's not even from the bike, but could be a 'stray' from other work that has been going on in the garage. I can't find any mention of it in the Honda manual.

Oh, and I'm still after a replacement exhaust!
 

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Need Constant Supervision
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Could you post a picture of said item and some one might identify it?
 

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That looks like a small dowl pin, something that usually lines up two parts of casing. Don't know the clutch operation of the AT so would not be able to tell whether it is part of it or not. If it is a dowl pin not serious if you did not put it back. Only one way to find out.... :shock:

Anybody else stripped an AT to the bare minumum before?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Yep - I did wonder about the dowel pin thing, but all of the others are hollow, whereas this one is solid. Also, it has a 'friction' marking running around the middle of it, where it has been in contact with something else.

I once again went through the manual and couldn't see it anywhere, so am getting more convinced that its a remnant from a previous project - may well be an old land rover part!

As you say, I'll just have to throw the engine in the bike, and see what happens ...
 
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