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Discussion Starter #1
hey its gonna be my first time to change back tyre .is it worth getting the shop to do it or buy tyre leavers and do it me self as money is abit tight at the mo .and i am pretty good with me hands so me mum says. tips tips tips pleeeeeease love u all like my owm flesh and blood.......... xx
:D
 

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Pleb
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Definately DIY.
That beer after will taste GOOOOOOOOOD! (If you can pick it up).

Get the biggest tyre levers you can.
 
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what the bloodey ell is a bead ....................????????????
 

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Pleb
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It's the bloody tough bit with wire that sits on the rim.
 

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Buy a commercail bead breaker, the type they use on trucks, the tyre will be of in less than a minute and you wont even break into a sweat, and try and nick some of that soap they use in tyre places for putting the tyre on, certainly makes putting the tyre on a lot easier

Sie
 

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This tip works for me every time.
Get the wheel off, let the air out then use a tyre lever and try and push the tyre down from the rim and spray loads of WD40 around the bead area (where the tyre meets the rim) and I mean loads not just a couple of sprays, get a good puddle in there. do this all the way around the tyre. Then go for a cup of tea/coffee/beer and leave it for 1/2 hour to 1 hour. You will still need a bit of muscle but no where near as much without the WD40. Good luck.

Bill
 

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Get out your weldingkit and make one of these, very handy when refitting the new tire too. I saw someone suggest the biggest levers you can find, this should not be necessary, you just run a bigger risk of ruining your rims.



When not in the workshop a friends bike is great to find, in this case my bike is doing the beadbraking.
 

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simplysie said:
Buy a commercail bead breaker, the type they use on trucks, the tyre will be of in less than a minute

Sie
A minute :shock: I think not ! :lol: The bead breaker just breaks the bead and can hold the tyre in position. Its doesn't take the wheel off the rim

Given that Manolis is about to do his first tyre change on the rear tyre (fronts are easier) and he doesn't know what the bead is (no disrespect) I recommend he takes it to a tyre place for them to fit and for him to watch and learn.
Its will save you time and a lot of pain. Then you can tackle the front tyre once you know what to do.
There lots little things which is hard, for me at least, to explain in words. I need pictures ! :lol:

Northy

Ps I stupid enough to do my own changes for years nowever theres always something ....... i.e the rear on my Guzzi 20 min to change the tyre, another hour to get it seated on the rim properly (despite soap, air compressor and over inflating it )
 
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mmmmmmmmmm flip n eck ill nip the tyre down the road and get them to do it .......... cluck cluk cluck ive just laid an egg...... many thanks guys this sort of info available is just price less : > 8)
 

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Ok so maybe i lied, :oops: but using the truck bead breaker and truck tyre levers it was off in a very short amount of time, mind you with tyre levers that are around three foot in length you couldn't take them touring on the bike :cry: :cry:

Sie
 

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I always used to change my own tyres, but after the last time when I nipped the tube and had to start over again. I know use a dealer the wheel also comes back balanced, for £10 it is not worth the hassel.
 

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That damn bead!

At long last managed to get my tyres at home from work and decided to give this tyre fitting malarky a bash.

Front tyre came off pretty easy and needed to grab the old impact tool to get the rusty screws out.



As you can see they have not been out for a while :?



No broken studs, bolts etc and copper greased everthing with the fitting again



The front tyre bead if there was one was no hassle at all and managed to swap the tyres and tubes in about 40 minutes (Yes I caught the tube when refitting the new wheel and buggered it up :( )

I was about to take out the caliper pins but could not work out if they screw or just push out ? So left them as is although did spray some brake cleaner around the caliper pistons to clean them a bit. The do seem to work regardless of the dirt around them.

Something worth mentioning probably is remember to check the rotation of the tyre before fitting it back onto the rim



You can barely make out the arrow in the left top of the above picture.

Again in the following on 12 o'clock you should check the arrow.



It was recommended to me as precaution to rather fit new tubes and as mentioned good thing ordered them as I stuff the brand new one up the firts time around.



Wheel torque according to the little handbook is around 68nm



And the small nuts with the copper grease that looks like rust should be around 12nm.

Even though with more than 13k miles on the front it seems ok for another while but note the way the left hand blocks are worn more than the right



Not bad for a bridgestone and touch wood never left the road under me :D



NOw I know you guys are probably sitting there in great anticipation awaiting my exciting news about the rear so let's start with this...



Yes that's correct my side stand broke off from the Tenere as the bead broke on one side of the rear tyre. I have been struggling the last 2 hours to get the other side of the bead broken and no luck. Have soaked the m*&^fu$£ker in oil and wd40 and having some tea. So another tip make sure the side stand is in good nick and not 20 years old.

Only problem now is I do not have another side stand to break :shock: and thinking unless really really really necessary stuck next to the road in africa somewhere will I attemt to change the bloody rear tyre. For the sake of £10-15 it can rather be done by someone with the right tools.

Watch this space..... :roll:
 

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Manolis
I hope that with all this good advice, you have realised that this can be a fairly simple DIY job, but it can also be a huge pain, both in frustration and more physically when the tyre levers slip and smack you in the face.
Compromise, take the wheels off yourself and take them to a tyre fitter (preferably the one you got your tyres off), stand over them while they do it and if your rims are still shiny point this out to them occaisionaly, then when you get them back re-fit the wheels and torque up properly with copper grease on the threads, if you leave this bit to the fitter you will need a scaffold pole on your wrench when you come to take the wheels off again!
Check your wheel bearings (try and rock the wheel with it up in the air) before you take the wheels off and replace these at the same time if they seem loose.
 

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Maverick
I noticed the other day that the blocks on my front are more worn on the right, is this because I go round too many roundabouts and is this why it goes all wiggly when I go over the white line?
 

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Dilbert said:
Maverick
I noticed the other day that the blocks on my front are more worn on the right, is this because I go round too many roundabouts and is this why it goes all wiggly when I go over the white line?
I got my left and right mixed up it's actually like you said the right hand side is more worn. Have noticed more movement on white lines and a bit of vibration over 90mph the few odd ocassions I might venture into warp speed.

Update after struggling another 2 hours with no luck found the nearest motorcycle place about to close and the guy was happy to quickly break the bead on their tire machine. The new rear tyre is now 97% on the rear rim but I am so knackered by now that I just closed the garage and will try again tomorrow with bigger tyre leavers. The 12' tyre leavers just can't get that last bit of the tyre over the rim without slipping out or bending.

Don't know how the hell you suppose to fix a puncture next to the road on the rear :?: It probably get's easier when you have done it a few times but not interested doing it again honestly.
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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Maverick, if you want to bring the bike or wheel here I will use my bead breaker on it and show you how to avoid nipping the tube.
 

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Thanks for the offer Yen, I am going to give it one more try tomorrow morning and it is that final little effort to get the last bit of the new tyre on the rim basically. If I don't succeed will contact you and bring it over by car :?
 
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