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Discussion Starter #1
i am thinking of getting one, i've yet to test ride one, so i was wondering if anyone here has ridden/owned one? any feedback? is it a good "do it all" bike? is the seat up to long distance touring?

(basically what i am looking for is something that is like the Transalp 650, but with a bit more power for touring)
 

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Yeah be interesting to hear opinions from people who have been riding transalps and if I were younger I would be looking at one myself and although I've heard good reports about the DCT model I think I would probably stick with the manual, really cannot get on with all this technology and not being able to sort a bike myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i have ridden an NC750X with DCT, it was ok, i can see how it would be useful/less hassle if you were commuting everyday

the DCT adds 10 kilos to the Africa Twin weight, and I guess it's something else to go wrong in XX years time

I am looking at the Africa Twin or the Vstrom 650 as a "do it all bike". Budget up to £7,000. (Tiger 800 and BMW GS are too ugly)
 

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Should be interesting once some input starts coming through.
I must admit, if I had the disposable funds available (I don't!), a manual one would be at/near the top of my list, one of the few that really stands out

Sent from my SM-A320FL using Tapatalk
 

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I really fancy one and was wandering the same....I recon 7k would buy a good clean second hand one just about. Manual of course
 

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Ive owned my manual CRF1000 Africa Twin for two years and my 2002 XRV750 Africa Twin for twelve years, but I've never ridden a Transalp, I'm afraid. All I can say is that the "new" AT keeps all the character of the older model, but with over 30 bhp more. It is, for me, a do it all bike: fast enough, it handles well on road, even with the 21 inch front wheel, and is surprisingly frugal with fuel. Unlike the older AT, the seat is comfortable for long distances and all in all I'm very happy with the bike. The only "fault" is that the dash panel can be difficult to read in sunlight. The seat height may be a problem for shorter riders. I suppose the only way to be sure is by taking a test ride!!

By the way, the lack of electronics on early models (except ABS and traction control) is very welcome as far as I'm concerned!!!!
 

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I've owned mine for over 3 years now and still own the RD07 which i still love but its barely turned a wheel since i bought the CRF, if your a lump like me and take a passenger regularly you have to change the rear spring at the very least, it totally transforms the ride two up. I fitted a hyperpro spring on the rear only £86 so no massive bill to upgrade.
I am so glad i was one of the first to take a chance on the new bike, i stopped listening to all the hype long before it was released, took a test ride and made my own mind up.
If you like it simple the 2016/17 bikes had cable operated throttle, ABS and traction control that's it with the electronic stuff both can be shut off permanently by pulling the ABS fuse if you wish to do so, after 2017 they went fly by wire and added more options on TC settings which = to me more complications but that's just me.
The seat yes well what can i say about that, i found the RD07 seat a pain in the arse so why should the new one be any different lol again this varies hugely person to person i find it uncomfortable others have no issues, my wife is almost 6ft tall and has no problems with the room on the bike or the comfort, only her need to pee routine is a pain.:iconbiggrin:
Test ride is the only way to go no one can make your mind up for you as everyone has their own opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
interesting... i didn't know the 2018 models had these upgrades

https://www.mcnews.com.au/2018-honda-crf1000l-africa-twin/

[h=4]2018 Africa Twin Updates[/h]
  • New intake design and exhaust aid mid-range response
  • New exhaust also designed to improve engine note
  • New lighter balance shaft weight
  • New lithium-ion battery saves 2.3 kg and enhances durability
  • New Throttle By Wire system with four riding modes
  • Wet weight 2kg lighter at 230kg (MT version)
  • Rider footepgs and pillion footpeg hangers redesigned for off-road use
  • Stainless steel spokes improve durability and ease of care
  • New Emergency Stop Signal function for rear indicators
 

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Did they replace early models corrosion prone spokes with stainless steel ones on warranty?

Tempted myself for newer AT - tried an Triumph Tiger 966i for the long distance cruising extra horsies but way heavier than 650 TA. Plus not up to Honda build quality, electrical issues so sold after a couple of years.

Noticed a lot of DCT ATs for sale - manual gearbox seems more sought after...
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
yeah, i have noticed a lot of DCT ones on ebay

the Tiger 955i is very very top heavy. i had one and sold it for that reason, and that fact it had a few mechanical issues

i think they offered to replace the corroded spokes on early models
 

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I have ridden ATAS DCT 33kkms. It has best suspension of all bikes I have ever driven (ok excluding motocross bikes). Compared to Transalp it is guite top heavy, almost no go to single tracks or bad places. It is all different bike, best used in gravel roads, touring etc. Weight 253kg, Transalp -89 195kg. I just bought Transalp for offroad bike, knobby tires etc :)
Manual normal AT may be better all purpose bike because of weight and lower cog (anyway ATAS feels light and agile when got some speed).

Lähetetty minun E6553 laitteesta Tapatalkilla
 

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Did they replace early models corrosion prone spokes with stainless steel ones on warranty?
Some they did some they didn't it all depended on the dealer my mate had two sets of wheels before they eventually gave him ones with stainless spokes mine is still on the original wheels and no problems with them
 

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I own 2 Transalp 650's, a 2002 one which I had from new and which has done 112K ml / 180K km and a 2006 one which I bought with 6K ml on the clock and which has now done 35K ml, mostly commuting to central London. The older one has been all around Europe, Turkey, Georgia, Tunisia and has been used extensively in extreme enduro trails (have modified its suspension and various other bits).

I also own a CRF 2017 manual since April 2017 with which has already 38K ml / 61K km on the clock and with which I have done the Silk Road to Kyrgistan and have also been two-up to Morocco. The CRF is a worthy successor to the XRVs/XLVs of the past, especially the manual non-ATAS models that keep the weight/height manageable for difficult trails. It resembles more the XLV rather than the XRV as it is relatively agile like the XLV and not top/front-heavy like the XRV. The seat is much better than the terrible seat of the XRV but nothing like the throne-like seat of the XLV for long distances - I have modified mine and is now better. The first gear is also long-ish, like the XLV and unlike the XRV - I have improved this through a +1 tooth rear sprocket (43) and this has also made the long 6th gear much more usable. The rear spring is also too soft for two up with luggage, I have replaced it with a 95N/mm Κ-Tech one and this has fixed it. Finally, the protection of the engine side cases is inexistent and the bike needs low bars or a suitable belly pan for those who take it seriously off road.

All in all, I think the CRF1000 is a more than worthy successor to the XRVs/XLVs of the past, with much more torque low down, enough power to travel in relatively high speeds with no problem (100mph/160kmh) and very capable off road in the right hands. When the going gets really tough off-road (dry river beds, very rocky terrain etc), I prefer my modified XLV but overall the CRF is an extremely capable bike overall and very frugal as well. For the type of riding I do, I cannot think of a better bike I would have (I nearly bought a KTM 990 before the CRF1000 came out).
 

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I test road the Africa Twin Adventure Sports model a couple of months back.
Yes it is a bit top heavy but I found it to be a great ride and loved the bike in general. However, the larger tank makes it a bit too wide at the front and I couldn't get to like the ride height. With the seat low I could touch the ground okay so fine for my commute and getting it in/out of the garage but with the seat high it was a stretch to the ground and I felt that I might drop it!

So I didn't get one. However, on thursday I'm arranged a test ride of the Africa Twin in manual and DCT models so will let you know then!!
 

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There's a CRF1100 being launched next year so there could be some deals on CRF1000 coming up in a few months. I think when the Adv sports came out some dealers were clearing new CRF1000's for £9k
 

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Yup.
New (manual) AT replaced old TA in 2016.

New AT is Jolly Good and fun to ride.
New AT I find comfortable and more capable than the old TA for distance work.
New AT rider's seat height is adjustable.
New AT parallel twin engine firing/timing kinda emulates that old V-twin engine feel.
New AT traction control function can be switched off.
New AT digital display has mostly thwarted old fart me.
New AT touring screen is good in the dry, but in the wet, raindrops seem to view obscuringly cling to mine at low and higher velocities.
New AT OE luggage is Ok'ish plastic, conveniently fits on the motorcycle without the need for masses of scaffolding, has kept my stuff dry in stormy weather, but could be stronger, better designed, with top opening panniers and exterior loops for attaching cargo nets etcetera.
New AT (now three years old) is in no danger of being sold on by me any time soon.
 

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Well I test rode both the manual and the DCT version.

I liked both, but found the DCT to just have more than I really needed in the control department. Too much technology for me in the way of altering rider modes and switching between different levels of sport mode etc. I preferred the simplicity of the manual version. Yes you can switch the DCT into manual mode but switching gear with two bar switches just didn't feel right and was confusing. You can get a gear lever conversion but I didn't see the point!

The manual just rode slightly better and I liked being in control of the gear selection and really liked it. I liked it so much that I bought it and will hopefully be picking it up towards the end of next week. Spent a bit extra and got it with the Honda/Touratech luggage kit offer so it will come with crash bar, skid plate, tailored panniers and a topbox. I say tailored panniers because it comes with a larger pannier for the left and the right one is slightly smaller and is curved around the exhaust.

I'll post a suitable photo when I pick it up.

:p:p:p:p
 

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Nice one :thumbup:See if you can get the center stand thrown in with the deal i managed that when i got mine
 
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