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Professional Geek
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Discussion Starter #1
Top Tip for all you AT pilots (I was going to put this in bike tech, but guess it's really only of use to AT owners, all other off-road bikes have rims that make it easy to change tyres).

I have a set of Buzzetti tyre levers bought off ebay which I'm taking with us on our trip (the nice curved type), but until today had no way of breaking the bead on the rear tyre. Bit of an issue, we're due to set off on Monday and my bald Anakees were never going to make it to Capetown. A sidestand would normally work fine, but could be tricky as we've both now got big feet stuck on the ends of our sidestands.

So - I thought about what was posted up here a few months back - a lairy over-engineered "lightweight" bead breaker made up of tyre levers, pressed steel thingummies and bolts and clips and so on. I reckoned I could do better, so set to with the drill and a bit of clutch cable and the arrangement you see laid on it's side below is the result.



I drilled two holes in one of the long levers - one 6mm and one 3mm.
I drilled one hole in the short lever - 6mm
I looped a bit of clutch cable through the 3mm hole and secured it with rope clamps.

To use as a bead breaker, you assemble as shown above, the lower lever sticks out from under the wheel, away from the hub, with the cable hooked securely under the end just inside the rim. If you put the short lever the right way round next to the other long one, the tip ends up directly under the one you're going to use as a handle because of the dogleg in the end of the lever - nice. With a a 6mm bolt through the pivot points (no need for a nut even) you can use the free end of the short lever to "aim" the other end at the bead. While still "steering" with the end of the short lever, bring the end of the long lever down to break the bead. Job's a good 'un... Once the bead's broken, you can push it off the rest of the way with your foot. Easy. Once that's done, you can still use all three levers as normal to actually change the tyre!

It's hardly world class I know, and Kwik-Fit have already turned down the licensing deal. But it works a treat and the advantage is the only bit of weight you're carrying that you wouldn't be otherwise is the bit of cable and a couple of rope clamps that now live securely attached to the end of one lever. They don't even get in the way when you're using the lever as Buzzetti intended!

Now - if you like the idea, how's about you nip over to justgiving and sponsor us a fiver?

Oh go on, ya can't say fairer than that... :D
 

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All the gear...no idea
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had an annakee changed yesterday at a local bike shop and i watched him do it. Dont know how he broke the bead as one second it was in front of hime with air in, the next second he had tyre levers in removing tyre. So it cant be so hard(that was on the front one anyway)
 

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Hmmm, well, I've always found the sidestand does it for me!
 

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Professional Geek
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Discussion Starter #7
africajim said:
Hmmm, well, I've always found the sidestand does it for me!
Fair call, one of the main reasons for sorting an alternative solution was that my sidestand now looks like this (only with a bit more worn off the corner now... :):



it's new foot is far too big (it'd spread the load too wide and make it very difficult to break the bead) and also too bendy - it'd bend long before the bead broke.

(the other main reason was to make it less likely that I'll drop the bike on myself, in the mud, in a quiet corner of Niger...) :D :D
 

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Good grief! That sail bound to catch as much wind as cost about 5 mpg! Be a great tool for taking the tops off of potato plants in the fields though! I always said @T's were agricultural, there's the proof! It's a farm impliment!

I'll stick to my puck I carry in my pocket!

LOL!

Sorry mate, just jesting! I welded a plate on to one of mine, not quite so big mind you!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
:D Yep, and top speed is now about 75mph... :D

It is big, if I did it again, I'd not make it quite so big. But it's very effective at stopping the bike sinking, and with a fully laden bike, a big foot is easier to handle than a puck!

Agreed on the agriculturalness :D :D
 

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21st Century Schizoid Man
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...snip


I drilled two holes in one of the long levers - one 6mm and one 3mm.
I drilled one hole in the short lever - 6mm
I looped a bit of clutch cable through the 3mm hole and secured it with rope clamps...snip
Looks great DJ! Can you explain a little more about how you secured the cable? Rope clamps? Watswonofthem? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Rope clamps? Watswonofthem? :)
Yep, no problem - rope clamps are little U-bolts with little cast plates the ends of the U go through. You do up the nuts on the ends of the U with the rope/cable trapped between the plate and the curve of the U. They're used for securing steel rope in all sorts of applications.

Amazingly enough, they're readily available in the right size from B&Q, I got a pack of four for two pounds sixty-something.
 

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21st Century Schizoid Man
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Now I think of it, they're exactly like miniature versions of the U-bolt clamps used to hold some car exhaust joints together...
Cool as DJ - thanks :blob4:
 
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