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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm just planning a couple of jobs for the Transrat, one of which is modifying the wiring loom by chopping the bundles of cables & connectors to fit the lack of fairing. :rolleyes:

But

While I can get by and understand DC electrics reasonably well, can anyone shed any light or have any tips for dealing with the mass of wires that will emerge when I open up the loom - I get a little overwhelmed at the tangled mess when I make a start & decide to put it all back as is :confused: but I'd really like it tidied up!

Part of my criteria for the bike is to lose as much of the unnescessary crap & complications that go into a (fairly) modern bike, while keeping the all round reliability & usability of the bike. :cool:

Considered jobs/potential problems;

It seems ludicrous to have the fusebox under the l/h sidepanel when pretty much all the wiring leads to/from it & the switches at the front of the bike (ignition, lights, starter, fan etc), so logic says move it to behind the headlight & lose a few connectors & a whole bundle of cable in the process.
BUT,
no matter how much I look at the wiring diagrams, I cannot understand how the neutral/sidestand/clutch circuit works to cut the starter circuit. I know the basis of how it works & the purpose of the diodes but just cannot get my head round the flow of electricity within the circuit.

Any help in this area would be great.
The other option would be to just leave the diode attached to it's three wires where it is!

I have noticed a couple of burnt yellow wires between the alternator & reg/rec.
Now the Reg/rec is original & good - never been any problem, one wire is scorched at the connector block near the CDI and a couple of the wires are a little darkened at the connector on the Reg/Rec. There is no signs of corrosion on any of the connector terminals (I always disassemble them & spray with WD40 & Vaseline them when I get a bike to prevent this). The darkened wires at the reg/rec end show signs that the insulation has started to melt......
The only single incident I can think of was over last winter, a few of us had a rideout, I had just fitted the twin headlight fairing, running with both lights on, along with heated grips on too. After parking up the battery was flat, bumped it off, disconnected one headlight & it's been no probs since.

Surely, the wiring should be able to cope with the alternator running at max output without starting to melt?
Is there anything else I can check?
Is it worth stripping back the loom & replacing the three yellow wires?

Think that's it for the time being,
Cheers, Phil
 

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Austin's Son
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190 Posts
Can you post a wiring diagram? May be able to help, my degree would indicate I should be able to, whether I can or not will be another question.
 

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2 bikes = twice as happy
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4,354 Posts
Electrickery goes down red brown or blue wires, does it's business then goes back up black or green wires. but neither of these statements is always true and sometimez it seems to go both ways at once. Yellow wires confuse me as does any multi coloured wire. Equally confusing is anything with a relay in the circuit.

Sorry no help whatsoever.:confused:
 

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Austin's Son
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190 Posts
Right, I think I have got it, well in my head I have at least.

Power comes down the Red wire, now looking at the neutral lamp branch, there is power present at the 'b' terminal of the lamp, for it to illuminate there must be a ground on the other side (the light green/red wire). The diode is there to stop the clutch/side stand providing a ground to the bulb. So the only way a ground can be given to the bulb is by the neutral switch.

Back to the power coming down the Red wire, looking at the starter motor switch branch, when the switch is pressed power flows to the magnetic switch (Yellow/Red wire). The coil looking component in the switch will produce a magnetic field when power flows though it, the magnetic field then allows the power from the battery to the motor. For the coil to power up, a ground needs to present at the Green/Red wire. If the neutral switch is on (that is allowing a ground through) then Green/Red wire gets it ground through the diode and the neutral switch. Otherwise it can get its ground when side stand switch is on, this presents a ground at the clutch switch and when the clutch switch is on, ground is present at the Green/Red wire and the coil powers and the bike starts.

Not sure how much sense that will make to anyone else but that is what I can draw from the diagram.
 

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SHW'MAE BUTT
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3,270 Posts
Phil ,Just go in with a side cutters cut any thing you don't like the look of, that's what my dum nut engineers are doing at the moment.
But get a coloured photo copy of the wiring harness Haynes have good ones or the inter net, print them up to A3 size and this will make it easier to follow and safer when you decide what you want to loose and keep. Diodes are in simple terms a one way valve. If your not sure give me a call but send me a copy of the circuit diagram first. J
 

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Discussion Starter #9
OK, thanks for the replies all.

It's a little clearer now, I can understand it while carefully looking at the wiring diagram but not enough to start chopping it & trying to fix it if/when it doesn't work.
I think I'll leave this part of the wiring alone.

J, yep I already have a (poor) A4 photo copy of the Haynes wiring diagram that I've started marking up to get a bit of a plan.

I'm going into this cautiously - I know that the original electrics work & will continue to do so, I don't want to introduce problems for a couple of years' down the line.......

Now, does anyone have a late (single) 600 Alp CDI & it's connector lying around??? :rolleyes:

Phil
 
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