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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey. I think that compaired to most, I get very feared out when crosswinds hit:(:mad:. This is because last year when riding my old XT600E fully loaded I was blown clean off the A9 when headed up north through Scotland, brown pants indeed!!! And now with winter approaching and the Scottish winds getting stronger and staying longer Im thinking of selling the bike, but I really dont want too! With the @ being such a big bike I would expect it to act a bit like a sail, but the other day when attempting to drive back over the Dramochter Pass I had to turn back, I was getting blown all over the place and just thought bo!!*cks to it!! Sometimes in high cross winds it feels like the wheels are going to be blown out from underneath me, other times I really have to battle and I feel like I have fight the bike to keep it on track. Is there any advise you guys can throw my way? I dont mind strong head winds or tail winds, its just cross winds that really fear me out. cheers for any helpfull tips!:thumbup:
 

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Nobody likes em mate i,m 12st pizz wet through and ride a Vara and been battered many times fully loaded its not nice but just lean into it and get on and if it gets too bad get off and have a ***:thumbleft: don,t get rid of the @ it aint windy every day
Phil
 

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one of the lost boys
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Nobody likes em mate i,m 12st pizz wet through and ride a Vara and been battered many times fully loaded its not nice but just lean into it and get on and if it gets too bad get off and have a ***:thumbleft: don,t get rid of the @ it aint windy every day
Phil
X2 battle through but don't get rid
 

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???
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I thought it was just me... I took the bike off a dual carriageway the other day and back on to B roads, the banks, hedges and 'other stuff' seemed to break the wind up a bit. Oddly enough though I was passed by a low skinny racing machine that seemed unaffected... (git)
 

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I hate crosswinds and have been blown all over the place by them.
On dual carriage-ways and Motor-ways I try to sit in the middle of the lane leaning into the wind, on a bike it is O.K. but in a Bus I get thrown about as if it is a sail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yeah, smaller lower bikes seem to fair much better in crosswinds, our taller dual sports bikes just act like a sail. I had the KTM 950 S for a while, f£$king tall bike!!! And that seemed even worse then my @! But still, anything over 20-25mph gusts and the bike just wants to fly away. Unfortunatly the bike is my only means of transport, I cant afford to get a car without selling the bike, so if I cant "master the art" of riding in high winds soon I will have to sell the bike:(, I average between 200 and 300 miles a week and 90% of the time I ahve to drive through the Dramochter pass, and I really dont fancy doing that through the winter in high winds, snow and ice!!!
 

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If you know where the wind is hitting you, as in it starts at a certain point as a clearing opens up then try riding so that you enter that point at a slight angle so when the wind hits, you can just lean into it and continue.
It does take a lot of nerve, When I ride over the QE2 Bridge I hate it, it has a wicked crosswind and is extremely high. I hate heights and dread fighting the wind as I cross so now I use another route.
 

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My KTM 950 Adventure was even worse,

I got blew into a gulley at the side of a offroad track once on the moors - scared me to death but i kept on the bike somehow.

Dont think its anything your doing wrong and its always the case that other bikers seem unaffected by the wind ( they are probably saying the same about you as you ride past )

The bike is no worse than any other large trail bike I have ridden and certainly not worth selling because of.

Scotland isnt the best place for avoiding riding in thne wind though is it :rolleyes: :D
 

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It does take a lot of nerve, When I ride over the QE2 Bridge I hate it, it has a wicked crosswind and is extremely high. I hate heights and dread fighting the wind as I cross so now I use another route.

hehe. My first ride (home) on the TA took me over the Severn bridge, the one with 2 foot high railings with a mental crosswind. Scary when you're in a car, when you're on a bike you realise that if you get blown off the edge you're going into the water double time! If I had the bike straight I'd drift lanes, so I just lent her over; thankfully it wasn't gusty and there were few big lorries to interrupt the wind on the other side of the bridge. I also found she was more stable with a teeny bit of acceleration behind her so I came off the bridge doing over 90 :angel7:
 

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When I had my KH250 I was taking my mum home from a hospital visit.
As we went around a bend a crosswind hit us and the bike lifted upright, Mum never said a word but new underwear was required.:D
 

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Counter steering really helps you stay on course in extreme side winds. You travel in a straight line although the bike will be leaning over. It's weird till you get the hang of it but it really does work. Laying down on the tank for the really scary hurricane weather really works too but looks odd to car drivers who think you're trying to go faster.

Passing lorries is a problem when it's gusty. Accelerating past them keeps the bike more stable as you pass the front of the cab where the extra push will try and get you. Worth slowing a little before the lorry so you can speed up when required.
 
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I've never really had a problem but always found making sure the elbows are bent is good, I sometimes find I've unconsciously tensed up and it really makes a balls of things, once I loosen up again the difference is amazing.

The wind on the AT doesn't bother me, never had a problem on any sportsbikes, but on a Triumph Tiger with a topbox I once had to turn around and abandon a journey home til the next day, but that was in a full storm with trees and telephone poles being blown down.

One of my best ever memories was riding it to the cliffs of Moher in another big storm. I was hanging off to one side like a monkey most of the way, and when I finally had to stop to try and turn around and return, the bike was being held up at about a 40plus degree angle just by the wind, at a standstill !!! I was thinking it was actually going to be blown away, eeek. What a brilliant ride though, the Atlantic was being churned up into a giant foam which literally covered the road like a bubblebath and it was hard to see with all the foam and foamballs flying through the air, never saw anything like it before or since :(
 

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The feeling of the bike being taken out from under you is one a lot of bikes suffer from and really nothing to worry about. You need to let the bike do what it wants to do and you will probably find that you don't get buffeted quite so much.

Relax as much as possible and don't grip the bars tightly. If you grip the tank more firmly with your knees you will find that you automatically loosen your grip on the handlebars. If you get buffeted it's easier to let the bike go where it wants to rather than try to fight it.

As for lorries, when overtaking in the wind, look as far ahead as you can rather than at the front of the lorry, that way you won't be tensing up as you come to the front and you will sail past much more easily.

The relaxing takes a bit of practice but it does work. Relax your grip on the handle bars, grip the tank more firmly and let the bike go, don't fight it.
 

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yep,squeeze the tank with your knees and have a relaxed grip on the bars. my T/A does the same thing. do you have a top-box? take it off if you dont need it,it all helps.
 
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