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Discussion Starter #1
:confused:

I'm looking at replacing my rear brake pads.

1) Mr. Haynes says push the caliper against the disc to press the old pads back in so when they're removed there's enough space to get the new ones in. How hard should I be pressing? I've no experience of working on disc brakes (though plenty on drum brakes, and the blood blisters to prove it!), and I've pressed, but to little avail (it gets a bit looser on the disc, but no real room created). Maybe I need to be more brutal with it? I've seen people trying to force pads in (with caliper off) using a screwdriver. Is this a more effective technique? (Haynes talks about venting the hydraulic system via the bleed screw if need be, but I want to avoid getting into that if at all possible.) Reservoir is up to half way between min and max, by the way.

2) Haynes says watch out for brake pad spring, but no illustration. Is this likely to fly out, and if so is its correct position fairly obvious?

3) Various threads talk about cleaning out and greasing up the caliper while at it. Should I be using meths, water or what, to clean. Is it fairly obvious what needs to be greased and where grease is a no-no? Should I be using hi-temperature brake grease?

4) Pad on one side is much more worn than the other. Is this normal-ish, or a sign of something amiss?

Your help will be appreciated.
 

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1) You should need a fairly firm shove to get the pistons back into the caliper, but it should not be giving you a hernia. I would suspect that one of the pistons is stuck, which is borne out by the fact that one pad is much more worn than the other. Looks like a caliper off job to give it a damn good clean, so's that you know it's right.

2) The pad spring is not likely to fly out - well, not in my experience anyway. However, a digital camera is a godsend for jobs like this. Take plenty of snaps - you may not need them, but then again you just might.

3) For cleaning of the caliper I would suggest meths (de-natured alcohol). You sometimes need to be careful with stuff labelled as "brake cleaner" as some types are NOT good for rubber parts - like brake seals for instance.

4) One side worn more than the other - see comment in 1) above - piston sticking.

Also, do you know if the brake fluid has ever been changed? If not then this is a good time to do it - especially as it would be a whole lot easier to clean up the caliper with it off the bike.

Some help?

Tony



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Discussion Starter #3
Also, do you know if the brake fluid has ever been changed? If not then this is a good time to do it - especially as it would be a whole lot easier to clean up the caliper with it off the bike.

Some help?

Tony
A great help! Thankyou.

Brake fluid should have been changed when the dealer did the (somewhat delayed) '24,000 mile' service about a year and 8,000 miles ago. (Due again in 4k miles.) I don't think I've got the patience these days to do that sort of malarkey myself, though.

Am I right to think I need high-temperature grease, and do I put it on the sliders and piston cylinders?
 

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If one pad has worn more than another then I sounds like the piston is stuck and it probably needs a rebuild.
 

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The rear caliper is a single-piston sliding type, so uneven wear across the two pads is likely to be because the caliper isn't sliding freely on its guide pins to distribute the braking effort between the two pads. A good clean and a light smear of copper ( or high melting point silicone) grease should sort this out. A sticky piston would normally result in poor, or no, braking effort
 

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Born to Slide
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Of course I forgot - I rebuilt a mates Fazer rear caliper this weekend and it was a double piston and a real pain to do - yes single ones are easy and a thorough clean and appropriate greasing.

I use a huge clamp on the piston to wind it back
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all for your help and suggestions. This afternoon I took the pads out - all much more straightforward and quicker than I'd expected. I also found another bit later in the Haynes manual (must have been hiding before! :book:) that has more info and a pic of the spring. Once the caliper was off the disc I managed to push in the piston no problem using my thumbs. As it happened the most worn pad had a bit more meat left on it than I'd expected, so I cleaned them up a bit and replaced for the moment. Caliper seemed to be sliding under little pressure, so I'm not sure why the pads should be wearing so much on one side. As I didn't want to embark on disconnecting the hydraulics I'll get the garage to give the caliper an overhaul and put the new pads in when it goes for a service in a week or two.

Thanks again for the help.:thumbup:
 
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