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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm looking for someone with metalwork skills to see how much the following would cost.

I need a stainless steel plate for either side of the bike, shaped to fit neatly on the inside of the frame of a Givi pannier rack. Pic coming for those unaware. Basically a square with a corner cut off it.
http://gallery.me.com/iphone/nigelfarquhar/100008#0
Givi frame

http://gallery.me.com/iphone/nigelfarquhar/100008#16
TT fuel rack

Needs to fit securely whilst also being removeable. Also strong enough to allow the attachment of a fuel can on the inner left side by attachment of a Touratech fuel can rack.
Must also allow the panniers at attach at the same time.

Why SS? Quality, rust proof, magnetic. Open to alternatives.

What for? Attachment of magnetic warning signs on the side of the Nike when required for cycle race marshalling and also the attachment of the fuel can.
 

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pure stainless is not magnetic and stainless will be a real bugger to cut down to sizeby normal means.
what you need is someone with access to a cnc machine , laser cutting rig or plasma cutter,good luck
 

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luddite
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pure stainless is not magnetic and stainless will be a real bugger to cut down to sizeby normal means.
what you need is someone with access to a cnc machine , laser cutting rig or plasma cutter,good luck

what he said, stainless is not magnetic.

I work a bit with marine grade stainless & up to about 3 or 4mm thick I can cut it with an angle grinder fitted with a stainless cutting disc. Angles & corners can be ground back using a stainless flapwheel type disc.

obviously something made up on a cnc machine would be a better bet.
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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In my previous job in a scrap metal yard I used to test chunks of metal plate with a portable spectroscope to identify them as various grades of stainless steel.

Once I had sorted it into 316, 304 etc, I would test the 316 for magnetism with a highly technical and expensive scientific instrument. Yup, a magnet on a bit of hairy string. We used to supply 316 St/St to a compass making company and about 30% of it would attract the magnet.

I used to have to put industrial magnets onto a larger version of spectroscope which used an electric arc on the material to produce the spectrum. The problem was the arc would attempt to avoid the magnet, so we would have to de-magnetise it temporarily. My mate would get a blowtorch on it, get it super hot then plonk it on the contacts quickly. I had a few seconds looking at thousands of lines to identify what it was made of. I also used to test swarf, that burns through in about a second, it made you quick if nothing else.
 

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yet another Dave
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if you want magnetic its going to have to be ordinary steel and painted/powdercoated. a simple flat sheet of 10SWG P-clipped on the frame will be plenty strong enough to hold a bottle.
cut a template out of card the exact size and shape you want and then any metalshop will cut it out for you for pennies, its a simple guillotine job. then file the corners and edges yourself, then paint it with hammerite garage door enamel, a very tough rust killing/proof paint.
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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I'm sure I remember something called Chrome Steel, as magnetic as normal steel but probably corrosion proof.
 

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Yes Yen Chrome steel is used on surgical instruments and on tools I dont think you can get it in sheets but I could be wrong:rolleyes:
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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Yes Yen Chrome steel is used on surgical instruments and on tools I dont think you can get it in sheets but I could be wrong:rolleyes:
I'm pretty sure I tested sheets of the stuff, but I could be wrong, it was a very long time ago.

I googled it and saw it is used in things like wheel bearings(the casing I would assume, not the balls/rollers). I've seen these rusted, so I'm not so sure about it being corrosion proof now.
 

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I could do you something in ally or possibly stainless but not sure if we have any thick enough. Not sure about the magnetism side of things, I thought stainless wasn't but just tried a magnet on a kitchen knife and it was so would have to check a sheet at work. Could do you virtually any thickness in ally but obviously you would lose the magnetic. I will check on monday to see what we have. Could knock you something up in ally very quickly so cost would probably be just postage and the cost of a packet of chocolate hob nobs for tea break!! If we have any stainless thick enough it might not cut in the guillotine so would take a lot longer.

John
 

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yet another Dave
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its a bit of a misnomer calling stainless steel stainless, all of it corrodes to some degree, there are hundreds of different grades, 70% are 300 series austenitic steel, these arent magnetic. then you can get ferritic which is stronger but less corrosion resistant and martensitic steel which is very strong but brittle as it has carbon in, which reduces corrosion resistance and makes the steel magnetic.
unfortunately to be called "stainless steel" a steel only has to have as little as 11% chrome content, then it might be rust resistant but its still gash. who has a rusty "stainless" exhaust on their bikes then? especially on the welds.....

SS is sometimes called inox steel from the french "inoxydable", the bloke who made cutlery in switzerland started called his company "victoria" knives after his mum died, then when stainless steel became available he changed it to "victorinox"
just in case you ever needed to know....
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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I found some strange small ingots up one end of the yard, tucked away in an open 40 gallon drum. I pulled one out, stuck it on the spectroscope and didn't recognise any of the lines. If this happened the next step was to turn the screen pointer onto a strong/bright line, then read the dial on the control. Every spectroscope was a little different so all had a calibration book, made when they were first constructed and tested in Germany,which gave the wavelength readings compared to the control dial. Once you had the wavelength you could look up in a huge book what element that line was produced by.

Turned out I'd found an old drum of depleted uranium.
 

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yet another Dave
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Turned out I'd found an old drum of depleted uranium.
you could make some glow in the dark billet parts,
market them as "yen's chernobyl accessories" or something
 

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I made a plate for the back of Cabby's top box (to stop the lock from being rifled :rolleyes:) from Duralumin,tough as old boots.Not sure if it's magnetic (ask him to check),I think it contains magnezium and copper and ....stuff :)
 

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yet another Dave
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I made a plate for the back of Cabby's top box (to stop the lock from being rifled :rolleyes:) from Duralumin,tough as old boots.Not sure if it's magnetic (ask him to check),I think it contains magnezium and copper and ....stuff :)
no aluminium alloy is magnetic.
(i dont mean "no, aluminium alloy IS magnetic", i mean "NO aluminium alloy is magnetic")

i remember ten or so years ago in the local paper an off road "driving experience" firm took a graphics sign company to court because they wouldnt refund them on some big magnetic signs they'd ordered for the sides of their wagons. their claim was thrown out because they should have realised the sides of landrovers are aluminium before ordering the signs.
 

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In that case, for a perfect result it's the Duralumin / Velcro / Bungie option then ? :D

Edit - Now i think about it why not nip down to the scrapper and salvage a fridge door,cut to size and bobs your fridge magnet ? (I've never seen a rusty fridge ?)
 

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one of the lost boys
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In that case, for a perfect result it's the Duralumin / Velcro / Bungie option then ? :D

Edit - Now i think about it why not nip down to the scrapper and salvage a fridge door,cut to size and bobs your fridge magnet ? (I've never seen a rusty fridge ?)

now enamelled steel would work you'll just have to seal the cut edges with hammer-rite:thumb:
 

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yet another Dave
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hammerite garage door enamel is tough as old boots, my poor garage door survives all the local bast.... i mean kiddies kicking a football against it all summer
 

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Kymmy accepts no responsibility for this blondes c
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just use mild steel and bzp plate it for gawds sake if you want it magnetic (also you dont want to know the cost of stainless at the minute!!)

we have access to both cnc laser and cnc waterjet, we also do all our own CAD in house if its any help... if you have a pattern (paper/card) do a 1:1 scan of it and mail to us we can then cut/BZP plate to order as we do with all the bike bits.

more about CNC, CAD & BZP work on the website. www.raidxtreme.eu
 
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