Honda XRV Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi,

I want to carry more fuel, in on or around the bike would be good. I do have a reasonably sized givi top box but would prefer to keep petrol out of there as it normally has my lunch in it. Can i get a bigger tank (useful for my daily commute of 100km's each way) or will I have to resort to more petrol cans (I already have 0.5l under the seat) which are only really useful on longer rides?

I had an unfortunate moment last weekend when following a friend on an ST1300. Although he knew I needed fuel he misinterpreted my wild gesticulations as some form of burgeoning madness, well his tank was still on about 1/2 full. We were 270km's in to our ride and had just passed through a town, having never been there before on exiting the town I realised the only petrol station was back at the beginning of town. At the same instant I realised this the last dregs of fuel were exhausted and i came to a halt. I had already used my emergency 1/2l of fuel at the time stop "just in case".
In his defense another had rider caught up to us so when the ST1300 looked back he still saw 2 sets of lights and had no idea I had actually come to a stop. Personally I was stunned too, just the week before I had managed 353kms out of a tank. But there again nailing the throttle open through some of the best sets of twisties in on the planet generally has the effect of creating a whirlpool in the tank.
I gave $20 and my trust to a local and sat and watched rider after rider go passed. Just as I was about to say bye to my $20 and wave down a rider my trust paid off and my fuel arrived.
I went back to the petrol station and filled up. Soon back on the pace, though not quite as spirited I headed in to the rain and later night for the rest of the ride. I was a tad more careful about filling up and did not need to use my emergency supply again.

As usual the Transalp performed fatastically over 1000 miles (except the incident with the lack of fuel) on a huge range of roads in severely adverse conditions (unmarked roads, heavy rain, poor surface, slips and washouts). Then when the going was good and the roads began to dry in the morning she carried right on going. I even managed to loose a pack on a ktm990, blackbird and fireblade who were aparently trying hard to catch me :thumb:. It was not my quickest 1000 miler but it was the wettest, rain and wet roads for probably 700 out of the 1000 miles. I could only wish for the range of the ST1300 but would not give up the ride/flexibility of the Transalp.

Recent work / improvements on the suspention have made some massive differnences in handling and comfort.
The rear shock had blown about 10,000 km's before, this was rebuilt (yes they can be despite what the manual says) and I spent a few thousand km's working out how to set the suspention.
The front was treated to some cartridge emulators, fitted by the same suspention guru who did my rear they have improved the front to something out of this world. Given the roughest road the front just sticks in there and the braking is much improved accidental lockups are a thing of the past but accidental stoppies are much more likely!
A conti attack on the rear was a good choice, I normally run cheep rubber, very few "moments" even when pushing 100+ (using uk mesurements) on at night on twisty, wet back roads :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Ah yeh, I forgot...
As i set off you to the camp the night before the ride. It became dark, really dark! my headlight bulb had blown I still had high beam so had to annoy those coming towards me until the next town where I proceeded to remove only that necessary to change the bulb.

So tell me, is there another way or did i really have to spend half an hour pulling the entire fairing off and putting it back on again?

You may also be interested in this ride report from the guy on the ST1300
Grand Challenge 2009 - 4 of a Kind - Kiwi Biker forums

and this is a good read too
Bandit Rider: 2009 Grand Challenge
 

·
one of the lost boys
Joined
·
6,127 Posts
Carrying extra fuel

cheapest is a section of fuel pipe and siphon out the pans tank:thumbright: only helpful if you ride out a lot with others. best and cheapest is a five litre jerry-can strapped to the back seat, there are rotobox's for fuel and fuelbags both are too expensive IMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Hein gericke do 2L fuel cans which are quite small and unobtrusive and would stow on the bike somewhere without too much trouble

mike(the grumpy old git 007) has one and he helped me out on the longest day when i ran dry in the middle of an edinburgh park after 200 miles(i know! i asked for it) but it gives a useful 20 miles when you need it most
 

·
Senile member, who r u ?
Joined
·
1,364 Posts
[quote Mark (the grumpy old git 007) has one and he helped me out on the longest day when i ran dry in the middle of an edinburgh park after 200 miles(i know! i asked for it) but it gives a useful 20 miles when you need it most[/quote]

Fixed it for ya Derek ! :thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,750 Posts
Do you really need to carry much more fuel in NZ - or just be more careful when you fill up!!!

Setting the carbs up can give a couple of mpg improvement & making a couple of holes in the top of the tank filler neck using a centre punch, means the tank can be properly brimmed, gaining an extra 1 - 1.5 ltrs of fuel.

Quite a few of us here can regularly get 200miles+ on a tank (for me, normally about 18-18.5ltr) over most riding styles/conditions, thats got to be 350k's ish.

If you really want a safety margin, just strap a 5ltr petrol can on the seat.

Phil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,768 Posts
You could always fit a trailer to the bike, filled with extra petrol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Do you really need to carry much more fuel in NZ - or just be more careful when you fill up!!!
It depends when and where you are riding... If riding with the rusty nuts guys then as much fuel as you can carry the better, best still if you don't have to stop to use it. It is so fustrating having to stop every 2 to 3 hours to fill up :(.
Also when commuting I can manage 1 1/2 trips to work... extending this would be good....
Setting the carbs up can give a couple of mpg improvement & making a couple of holes in the top of the tank filler neck using a centre punch, means the tank can be properly brimmed, gaining an extra 1 - 1.5 ltrs of fuel.
I have just ballanced them carbs (and done the valves) which made some difference. Tightning up the inlet manifold helped too :rolleyes:
The cat removal does not seem to have changed much apart from the exhaust note and a bit of power.
I've been thinking about playing with the jets, possibly sticking some 125's in there.

I take it you use the centre bunch to avoid curly bits of metal being added to the soup? that sounds like the kind of mod I need :thumb:

Quite a few of us here can regularly get 200miles+ on a tank (for me, normally about 18-18.5ltr) over most riding styles/conditions, thats got to be 350k's ish.
If you really want a safety margin, just strap a 5ltr petrol can on the seat.
Phil
I can get 350km's but I have to be really nice with the right wrist and stay on the main highway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
An alternative solution - jerry cans on both sides :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,231 Posts
Or even a much cheaper route albeit on a modified RD03....
 

·
Bloody furriner
Joined
·
5,010 Posts
Do you really need to carry much more fuel in NZ - or just be more careful when you fill up!!!
I found it doable with the stock rental DR650 13 liter tank, but then you're stopping everywhere and it can still get a bit hairy at times.

Setting off from the rental place with what we'd been assured were brimmed tanks, yeah guess not. Hitting reserve a lot earlier than expected, errr 30 km on reserve before rolling into Arthur's Pass and filling up with the most expensive petrol in NZ. ;-)

I got a 5l can on the back after that, and ended up not touching it for the rest of the trip. But then I didn't go too far off the beaten track, or even the main roads. Lots of scare stories in Christchurch about there being no petrol on the west coast for hundreds of miles, but that was rubbish. ;-)



Lovely place to own a transalp in, though. :D:D:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I found it doable with the stock rental DR650 13 liter tank, but then you're stopping everywhere and it can still get a bit hairy at times.
I'm not saying I can't stop, I pass heaps of petrol stations every day, it is the act of stopping I don't like! And stopping at petrol stations it the pits!
Given I set off for work on monday and fill up. I come home, sleep and set off to work again on tuesday. Tuesday evening and not long after I set off home, I am back in the petrol station :( this continues for the rest of the week, about 4 fillups each week!

http://maps.google.co.nz/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=levin&daddr=Paekakariki+Hill+Rd+to:wellington&geocode=%3BFRh5jf0dQVFtCg%3B&hl=en&mra=mr&mrcr=0&via=1&sll=-40.945676,175.032806&sspn=0.143146,0.236893&ie=UTF8&z=9
Lovely place to own a transalp in, though. :D:D:D
Oh yes! :thumbup:
Here in Kiwiland the roads are secretly designed so that TA's can eat Tourers for breakfast, Cruisers for lunch and still have an appetite for sprots bikes for dinner. Then if you treat them nice you may have a nibble at a bigger ADV bike for supper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
It's a wee ****er so it is! The only thing that lets the bike down a bit. (although not a lot) The most I've managed so far is 172 mls then putting back in 17 litres so I reckon I could get to 190.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top