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one of the lost boys
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My plans to get to the Stella Alpina were scuppered by that poxy work thing. But when I did get home from work a parcel was waiting for my attention. :thumbup:
Pro-Oiler make fully electrical pumped oilers, they aint cheap but I fitted one before to the Varadero and never looked back. I had the choice of removing and trying to fit it on the RD04 or buy another unit. At €200 a serious decision but I opted for a new unit and the Dero can go to a new home with a decent bit of kit fitted.

First off was to decide where to fit everything, the RD04 hasn't got much room any where, I've removed the white "Thingy" from under the seat for the Autocom and there is still a little bit of room left.


Starting with the controller, the Pro-Oiler can be adjusted on the move with the + - buttons so I wanted that somewhere my left hand can get to it, It came with industry Velcro fitted so I've just stuck it to the LHS fairing, it can be removed easy enough when the panels have to be removed. The cables were then tied back and secured running back to under the seat.


Under the seat and behind the RHS side panel I fitted the pump and electrical junction box, again the junction box was secured with the supplied velcro, the pump sits in a recess underneath and is cable tied in. both seem to be well enough protected.



The whole system works on wheel revolutions, you can now get a GPS receiver that pumps on a distance covered basis but that was more money. I fitted the reed switch and magnet to the rear brake disc, the magnet sitting in one of the disc bolts and the reed switch secured to the inside of the nylon disc protector.



The junction box needs feeding with the controller cables, the pump cables, the reed switch and power so 4 holes were drilled into the junction box and everything connected. Oil in the pot and and charge the system.


Delivery to the chain is via a twin nozzle at the rear sprocket, fitted behind the chain protector. I suppose in really rough stuff it could get damaged, but then again so would any oiler fitted to the rear sprocket.


Road test in the morning. The first one fitted to the Dero needed setting, there were tables and conversion charts and it was a pain, once set though really hassle free. This one is pre-set, no tables or charts, not sure if it was set for the front or rear wheel but the new controller software looks like a simple conversion and adjust. wait and see I suppose.

Also fitted the tool tubes to the modded RD07 crash bars and pelicases to the rear, one behind the number plate with puncture repair kits, one for tyres one for the body. The top one will get a luggage plate fitted and will hold a lock, cargo net and quick to hand stuff.


Oh and new lights

Turn signals with combined rear / brake lights and a LED slim rear light set up.

Getting there

 

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So whats wrong with the old fashioned buy a can of chain lube and give it a spray now and again ? Todays modern PTFE chain lube doesn't fling off the chain either like oil and there's always room to take a can with you on a long journey.
Most of these set ups look like the oil is directed to the top of the chain and not inside it so it can work it's way through the chain links.

Have used good quality ptfe chain lube and never had problems and doesn't take much to put the bike on the main stand and spray the chain ;)
 

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Born to Slide
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1,741 Posts
So whats wrong with the old fashioned buy a can of chain lube and give it a spray now and again ? Todays modern PTFE chain lube doesn't fling off the chain either like oil and there's always room to take a can with you on a long journey.
Most of these set ups look like the oil is directed to the top of the chain and not inside it so it can work it's way through the chain links.

Have used good quality ptfe chain lube and never had problems and doesn't take much to put the bike on the main stand and spray the chain ;)
? Always use a spray - easy to use and gets into chain well especially if you spray on inside when chain is hot - after a ride not before to stop it flinging off.
 

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one of the lost boys
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6,127 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Each to there own. Many believe they are oil'ing inside their chains but the seals prevent grease out and crud in. Auto oilers with oil that flings off clean the chain and keep it clean. Spray lube can turn to grinding paste if not cleaned and renewed regular enough.
You may disagree but that's my take on it, enough so to fit an oiler worth more than a crate of chain spray. I chose to share my take with a little write up didn't want to start a debate
 

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Ex seagoing truck driver
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357 Posts
And once it's fitted you can pretty much use any old gear oil you happen to have hiding at the back of the shelf. Good way to use up the odds & bobs.
 

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So manufacturers of chain lube/oil didn't need to really do any research then on what works..just hype as any old gear oil knocking about in my garage will do..well they sure suckered me :cyclopsani: ..
 

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Ex seagoing truck driver
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357 Posts
We're all suckers to advertising hype, haven't you realised that yet?

I know of someone who's been using only WD40 on his chains for years. He's a high mileage all-weather rider on a 250 and he informs me he has well over 40k miles on his chain and sprockets just using WD40 and they're still in good nick. Theory is, regular application with a non-sticky product means the dirt doesn't stick and act as abrasive.

Me? I'm using WD, with an occasional good soaking in EP80, and that's what I'll use when I get an oiler. Not saying that's what everyone should do, but then I don't go hooning about putting a lot of unnecessary stress on my bits, IYKWIM!:D
 

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Thanks for pics of fitting oiler. A note of caution.... 'do you have enough of clearance with your tool tube'?
 
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