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Hey guys, just wanted to share some info on my countershaft repair/bandaid job.
My countershaft was badly worn and needed replacing, so i figured i'll give it a shot.
It is possible to drill and thread a hole in the countershaft with correct tools.
It seems that only the outside of the shaft is hardened, the center is softer.
I used a carbide burr to start the hole, and get thru the hard outside shell.
Then i drilled a hole with carbide drill bit, had only 8mm laying around. Enlarged that again with a good hss dril to 9mm and tapped it with m10 thread.
It went surprisingly smooth.
I then machined an aluminium end cap, to clamp the sprocket all the way against the end of the splines. Loctite and ride.
Put few k km on the bike before I took it apart, still looked solid. I eventually put in a new countershaft, because i had the engine apart already. Otherwise i would just ride it like that.
Btw, all was done one the bike, dont even need to take the sprocket off.
 

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That's two of us now ! that has done the tapping of the shaft job then, but i went for 6mm x 1mm at 19mm deep thread..Yep carbide bits and tap done the job nicely..
6mm X 19.5 deep.JPG
 

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Have you repaired the splines on there as well Andy
 

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Yes Fred..about 6 years / 10k ago... there's a huge write up on here somewhere with pics of my fix with wider front sprocket I made..only minor wear that I shimmed up using cut and shaped feeler gauges bonded on...all holding together well.
 

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Yes Fred..about 6 years / 10k ago... there's a huge write up on here somewhere with pics of my fix with wider front sprocket I made..only minor wear that I shimmed up using cut and shaped feeler gauges bonded on...all holding together well.
Excellent (y) what did you use to bond them on. I'm using one of those superpinion sprockets and put some very expensive chemical metal on there but haven't used the bike to see if its any good.
 

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Hi Fred...The precision made shims were bonded to the splines to infill the wear using JB Weld..a very high temperature metal epoxy resin..My modified wider sprocket was bonded to the shaft with a special Loctite designed for spline wear..Loctite 660..hopefully will release before the JB Weld for changing..I made two identical wide front sprockets 23mm wide..Now has no sliding movement on the shaft and held on by my idea of a washer and wire locked bolts..Search on here for Knock Knock Knocking...Also on the ATR { Adventure Trail Rider } site under my name which is a better write up ! re-arranged and easier to understand ! by Nick, one of their guys that knows computers stuff...OR..go google and input....andy stannard shaft spline... and loads of my stuff comes up...
 

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Hi Fred...The precision made shims were bonded to the splines to infill the wear using JB Weld..a very high temperature metal epoxy resin..My modified wider sprocket was bonded to the shaft with a special Loctite designed for spline wear..Loctite 660..hopefully will release before the JB Weld for changing..I made two identical wide front sprockets 23mm wide..Now has no sliding movement on the shaft and held on by my idea of a washer and wire locked bolts..Search on here for Knock Knock Knocking...Also on the ATR { Adventure Trail Rider } site under my name which is a better write up ! re-arranged and easier to understand ! by Nick, one of their guys that knows computers stuff...OR..go google and input....andy stannard shaft spline... and loads of my stuff comes up...
Thanks Andy i remember this now i seen the photo great work (y) Superpinion sprocket has made this a bit easier as the sprocket covers all the splines so you dont have to modify one now.
 

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Thanks Andy i remember this now i seen the photo great work (y) Superpinion sprocket has made this a bit easier as the sprocket covers all the splines so you dont have to modify one now.
Yes..one of those will still fit mine, if my shims stay in place when I dismantle for new front.. their a brilliant invention. I don't think they were about when I fixed mine.?
 

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Remember to leave the chain loose. That is the cause of the counter shaft damage, though many will blame other causes. I'm glad to have owned my '03 650 since new, because we've traveled 180,000km together, and the shaft is still in very good condition.
 

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Keeping the correct chain slack is important but whether the cause of the worn splines is is due to a tight chain is not proven. Fretting is what causes the wear but like i said not sure if a tight chain will assist fretting corrosion/wear.
This is the front sprocket on my CRF1000L, that red rusty powder is a sign of fretting corrosion, I've owned this bike from new and has always had the chain tension slacker than what manufacturer states and this photo was taken when the bike had about 10000 miles on it. So in my opinion a fretting preventing lubricant is needed on the spline when fitting the sprocket which is what i done after seeing this. Almost every photo I've seen of worn splines has had this red dust around it. I don't know why some start this and others don't, where i live and ride the roads are twisty so your always on and off the throttle and i'm quite hard on the throttle as i like the acceleration maybe this doesn't help.
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Approximately 180,000km and immediately after sprocket removal. Rust particles surround it, fretting I guess.


Close up of the shaft after cleaning, and yes there is some very minor fretting wear, but I'm unlikely to ride this bike another 180,000km so I think it will out last me, and the bike too. I've noticed that bike mechanics treat these types of bikes as road bikes and only leave about 20 to 30mm of slack in the chain. I've had the same issue with a KLR650 in the early 2000s and noticed it in time. Since owning my TA I've made a habit of checking chain slack whenever it visits a bike shop, and found that complaining got me nowhere.
I've read/ been told that the movement of the sprocket on the shaft is intended to allow for a very small amount of misalignment between the sprockets. When chain slack isn't enough, the only place that there is any "give" is in this feature of the shaft, so the wear rate is multiplied. If lack of chain slack isn't the issue why isn't my bikes countershaft, which had never had anti-fret anything applied, in a far worse state?
And I guess I'd better start using anti-fret on it too.

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
 

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I might be able to help out anyone who needs a new countershaft. I have been living in Japan for 20 years and the shafts are still available here. I know because I’m about to go and order one! And they cost less than £70 / $100.
 

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@Jackflash Looking good (y) if you've done that mileage on it with no problems i'd think it should be good for the rest of the bikes life as you say. I do my own maintenance so if the chains too tight i can only blame me LOL.
I've taken the shock off both my XRV750 and CRF1000 and moved the swing arm to the tightest spots for the chain and on both bike as we already know the factory measurement is a bit too tight so i now adjust them appropriately. The XRV i bought about 10 years ago so i cant say what the previous owners done with it but it probably has more than twice the wear yours is showing so i put the superpinion sprocket on to hopefully stop it. The couple of pages i put up about fretting is part of a 297 page document almost all of it is way over my head but what i found surprising is it does say the wrong choice lubricant can be as bad as or worse than leaving it dry for fretting wear. perhaps that's why it comes dry from the factory. I'm using this on my CRF don't know if its any good so going to monitor things closely to see the effects as i'm planning to keep the bike for a while. it's already 5 years old this year
 

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VERY Nice to see Mr Honda has " dumped " the idea of the offset toothed washer to retain the sprocket, and gone back to the ancient idea of a simple bolted up jobby on the latest AT CRF1000...Although about 50 years to late..hope others will follow too....
 
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