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Had two really narrow escapes where cars just havent seen me decided to buy a Richa reflective waistcoat now nobody nods!! do they think Im an anorak!!!
 

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hedgerow specialist...
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Not at all,
I wear a high viz ex police full waistcoat for the commutes etc , and its better to be alive than dead. People still nod and wave:thumbright: .

As far as I`ll conerened they take me as I am or not:rolleyes: one world many choices.

you carry on enjoyong your 2 wheels snugg in the satisfaction you are a individual.
 

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Bling Tastic Transalp
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I am not a anorak .. just VERY VERY UNCOOL ..
Well thats the option of the Sportbikers round here.. Its very uncool to be seen ...

Very uncool to drive a transalp rather than a R1 ..

Very Uncool to drive a bike with a white helmet ..

Very uncool to be a friendly and courteous driver.

But at least the cagers can see me
, I noticed a huge difference when coming to junctions etc ..

I was unsure if I wanted to be Uncool .. but like you after a close call ,
I decided to be uncool and ALIVE .

And most bikers still nod or wave .. even the bike cops .. Haha
 

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one of the lost boys
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Same as Tramp
Police issue waistcoat, I dont care about the waves or nods as long as the cages take notice if they think I'm plod all the better it keeps them off my tail
The High Viz is more popular in the UK than over here so far I have not noticed anything negative
Safe Ridin'
 

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I wear a hi viz waistcoat over my jacket and I find most people nod, wave etc.

Of course some don't, but they probably wouldn't anyway hi viz or not. I find the power rangers are the most likely to ignore you...
 

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Truffle shuffle king
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I like to think of myself as a trendsetter!
Used Oxford yellow bib but still found cages pulling out on me. I then got the helmet and no one does (hope this lasts)
I still have friends ;) and I nod to everyone including scooters- they not so much nod back but there shoulders seem to move a lot.... Someone said they may be chuckling.... Nah I don't think so.?


These days I don't wear the yellow bib as I feel like a marker pen!

It is also a babe magnet.... Yes it is... On the ferry back from ireland, a qute young student (girl btw) came up and asked me if it was yellow or green as as my answer would end their argument
 

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Cannot be much doubt that the more you can be seen, the safer it will be - especially if commuting. Perversely, this sometimes means the car driver does some very odd things - especially women - but on balance, far safer to be seen.

The downside of course is that you can end up looking like a large highligher pen leaving a phosphorescent trail of image burn-in on the retinas of any passing persons. This is seriously un-cool.

For me, a combination of assuming the worst, defensive riding, the permanent headlight and not riding in busy cities is excuse enough not to wear such things - until I hit some arse pulling out of course...
 

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I am not a anorak .. just VERY VERY UNCOOL ..
Well thats the option of the Sportbikers round here.. Its very uncool to be seen ...

Very uncool to drive a transalp rather than a R1 ..

Very Uncool to drive a bike with a white helmet ..

Very uncool to be a friendly and courteous driver.

But at least the cagers can see me
, I noticed a huge difference when coming to junctions etc ..

I was unsure if I wanted to be Uncool .. but like you after a close call ,
I decided to be uncool and ALIVE .

And most bikers still nod or wave .. even the bike cops .. Haha
Riding an unusual bike in the correct gear is most likely to be the cause for cagers to be more curious as to your mode of transport.
 

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I don't think it is the colour that is uncool, but the generally cheap design of the bib/jacket. Some manufacturers are starting to make day-glo variants of their motorcycle clothing, and these do look much better.
 

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Truffle shuffle king
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I don't think it is the colour that is uncool, but the generally cheap design of the bib/jacket. Some manufacturers are starting to make day-glo variants of their motorcycle clothing, and these do look much better.
Agree alit about colour as there is usually a see of hiviz in urban areas.
This is expensive but in orange is good
Icon Mil Spec Vest - Yellow or Orange - Ultimate Bike Gear Ltd
People tend to look twice as they can't suss out what you are! Two looks are better than one
 

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Bling Tastic Transalp
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I don't think it is the colour that is uncool, but the generally cheap design of the bib/jacket. Some manufacturers are starting to make day-glo variants of their motorcycle clothing, and these do look much better.
Iam cheap .. live in Aberdeen .. LOL

Seen some nice day -glo clothing but I am poor .. and a tight scottish git ..

Agreed about people looking twice .. really helps ..

Might have to look more closely at buying something so I do not look so uncool ..

:rolleyes:

My Wife says ,, (*% $!) Them .. (swear word ) .. At least you come home safe , thats the important thing ..
 

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I remember a discussion years ago as to the merits or otherwise of having your motorbike headlights on for visibility - one person said when they weren't on their bike they drove a bloody great big red fire-engine, with all headlights on, flashing blue lights and sirens going, and STILL people pulled out in front of him!

Amazing how current fashion (and limited consumer choice) favours helmet colours/designs that appear almost designed to be camouflaged - try buying a plain red or orange helmet. Hence my helmet is same as AckAckFlack's.
 

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I remember a discussion years ago as to the merits or otherwise of having your motorbike headlights on for visibility - one person said when they weren't on their bike they drove a bloody great big red fire-engine, with all headlights on, flashing blue lights and sirens going, and STILL people pulled out in front of him!
I can well believe that. I used to have a bright AA yellow 110 Defender and I used to get people pulling out on me!

Of course, making ourselves conspicuous only helps when the car drivers are looking our way, which all to often they're not!

I've only had my bikevis LEDs fitted since Sunday and I have noticed a definite difference in the reactions of car drivers, especially while filtering. That can only be a good thing! :thumbright:
 

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I have Lots of reflective stickers on the bike including an ex-Police front mudguard great for riding after dark but I always wear the Hi-Viz waistcoat and have the 80W headlight on day and night. And if they fail to get you noticed I have a 139Db Stebel Magnum Horn fitted. That soon gets you noticed.

Found this article (from another forum)

In the UK motorcyclists are the most vulnerable road user group with a 40% higher fatality rate than car drivers.

The rate has risen in recent years, partly because the number of motorcycles on the road doubled between 1991 and 2001 with a particular increase in the number of riders returning to motorcycling after a long break.

The most common type of crash involving motorcyclists is other vehicles failing to give way and emerging into their path. Often these crashes occur even when the driver appears to be looking directly at the motorcycle.

Motorcyclists are often viewed as risk takers by car drivers and car drivers are often viewed as inattentive by motorcyclists. Looking to allocate blame does little to reduce risk whereas gaining an understanding of the issues affecting both drivers’ and motorcyclists’ and employing strategies to manage and reduce risk will have greater benefits.

So, why do these crashes occur? And more importantly, what can be done to reduce the likelihood of being involved in these types of crash?

Can drivers’ really look but not see motorcyclists?

The short answer would be ‘yes’.
Eye movement in the direction of the motorcycle does not mean that the driver actually notices it. Eye movement consists of two elements – fixation and saccades. Fixation occurs when the eye remains reasonably stable in one area and saccades are rapid jumps of the eye to new positions, during which time all visual input ceases. It would depend where a fixation point landed as to what is seen, as objects outside the immediate area are subject to less acuity and more difficult to identify. If a driver fixated on a larger vehicle following the motorcycle, which due to its size would appear the greater threat, there is a chance that the motorcycle could go undetected. This would be even more likely to happen if the driver were distracted, for example by talking on a mobile phone.

Research into this type of crash also found that drivers’ tend to choose smaller gaps when pulling out in front of motorcycles which could be partly due to viewing the motorcycle as less of a threat and also because the smaller the vehicle, the more difficult it is to judge a safe gap.

Vehicle windscreen (‘A’) pillars can also create blind spots, so while they may improve safety for people when they crash, they have the potential to make the crash more likely to occur in the first place. It has been suggested that current EU regulations regarding these pillars can result in the side profile of a car being excluded from view at a distance of 50 metres which could pose a significant risk to motorcyclists and other drivers’.


Does bright clothing and headlight use make motorcyclists safer?
There has been research that found wearing white helmets and hi-visibility clothing reduced the risk of crashing by 37%. But, it is the contrast which is more important than the colour. The more the motorcycle stands out from the background, the more likely it is to be seen.

It was initially suggested that using headlights during the daytime would grab driver’s attention as it was an unusual occurrence. However, an increasing number of vehicles now have headlights on during daylight hours which may mean that drivers’ won’t necessarily be drawn to a motorcycle purely because of headlight use.

Wearing hi-visibility clothing and using headlights during the day may well help to reduce risk but it shouldn’t be relied upon as a guarantee of being seen.

So, what can be done to reduce the risk?
¬Wearing protective clothing is important as it may help to reduce serious injury in the event of a crash but avoiding the crash all together would be the best strategy.

Being aware of the issues affecting drivers’ with regards to ‘look but failed to see’ factors and vehicle blind spots means that motorcyclists can take this into account and build it into their riding plan through anticipation. Riders can acknowledge the possibility that drivers’ may not have seen them and respond by reducing their speed or changing their position slightly on approach to junctions.

Further training to develop anticipatory skills and encourage positive attitude and risk management are far more beneficial than pure skills based training as this can actually increase the chances of having a crash due to over-confidence. While machine control is an important part of riding, it’s the ability to identify and manage risk effectively that will reduce the likelihood of being involved in a collision.

For further information on motorcycling issues and for details of Suffolk County Council education and training initiatives for riders of all ages please visit:
www.suffolkride.net


Sources:
Crundall, D., Clarke, D., Ward, P. and Bartle, C. (2008). ‘Car drivers’ skills and attitudes to motorcycle safety: A review’, Road Safety Report No. 85, Department for Transport.

Department for Transport (2008). ‘Road Accidents in Great Britain 2007: The Casualty Report’, Transport statistics.

Lin, M-R. And Kraus, J.F. (2009). ‘A review of risk factors and patterns of motorcycle injuries’, Accident Analysis and Prevention.

Mayhew, D. R. & Simpson, H. M. (2002). ‘The safety value of driver education and training’. Injury Prevention.

Wells,S., Mullin,B. and Norton, R. (2004). ‘Motorcycle rider conspicuity and crash related injury: case-control study’, British Medical Journal.
 

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Truffle shuffle king
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Grendel
I agree with the article and I can confirm that although he eye sees the bike it cannot calculate it's approaching speed. If you assume that a ca is around 6 ft wide the it will fill in more of the retina and the brain can triangulate it's increasing size change as it approaches. Bikes being much narrower cannot be calculated. Add to this that the average speed of a bike is 'usually' higher than a car it isn't too surprising cages pull out.
Adding another set of lights to make a triangular shape (lower on crashbars say) help to widen the bike and make it much easier to calculate it's speed.
Dayglo really does help - it is yellow because the eye is most sensitive to this frequency of light and dayglo reflects more light than it's surrounding objects - making it stand out. Interestingly when there is ample light around the benefit of yellow/green dayglo diminishes. Summer sunlight has loads of blue in it and it has been suggested that in this light orange would be best -(could go on fo ages as to why but don't go there)

Another point about dayglo jacket / bibs - they are of little use if you are close behind a car and wearing a black helmet in poor lighting. He car pulling out on you will not see much of the jacket u til the car infront has cleared and you suddenly become visible. This is partly why I chose the dayglo helmet.(which will probably give me brain cancer lol)

I did try to get a grant a year back to do research at Uni for visual cues needed to improve road safety but as it was going to only improve stats for a minority (bikes) they wouldn't help - still might do it on my own.

Ok ok you can wake up at the back now.. I have finished.
 

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I've ridden with one of these for years mainly for the commute. Drivers do see me more and mover over to let me past even buggernaughts move over, they get an extra big thank you wave.

I bought mine, the full jacket sort, as I thought the long sleeves would show up better round the perimiters of the fairing and screen, from Arco.

Graeme
 

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Bling Tastic Transalp
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Grendal ..

Great post , thanks for that ,,

I have got my wallet out :blah5: , and bought a richa yellow vest .. from that site posted eariler..

should stop the flapping .. :thumbright:


This is a good thread .. :toothy7:


Everyone drive safe now.. !!
 
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