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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there, just wanted to share my experiences with bying a de-humidifier.
Installed a hygrometer i my garage and realized I had constant humidity of 70%.
to inhibit corrosion i believe the humidity should be below 60%.
i therefore invested in a drier-rotor de-humidifier based on review on the internet. Ended up with the Meaco DD8L.
Operating temperature between 1 degree C and 37 degrees C, half a day of running at Medium resulted in reduction to 60%.
A day later 50%. Now running low speed on 50% and maintains the humidity level. 10l moisture extracted in 24-48 hours.
Very happy with it, and supposed to use little power. It also dissipates some heat.
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its a good idea all right . I wonder if they are expensive to run on electricity ? my brothers house got flooded 20 years ago I lost a 1972 ford escort in the same flood it was parked in his yard . he hired dehumidifiers and I would imagine they would be heavy on the leccy bill ? well the ones he had seemed a bit busy .
 

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I'm using a cheap unit from a do-it-yourself store for years now and I'm very happy with it.
Reason for using it: I store my scuba diving gear in the same garage as my tools and bikes.

The de-humidifier is in service ever since I got that storage setup and never had any issues with excess humidity.
Running the unit some hours a week is enough to keep humidity at around 50%. Works even in winter, not as efficient as in summer but results are still ok.

So 250 bucks for the unit opposed to possible damage to tools, bike and diving gear for me makes it quite a good deal.

Cheers
Markus
 

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I've just borrowed one to dry out carpets after a plumbing "mishap" (not my doing, I hasten to add ;)). Certainly does the job, and hasn't made a noticeable change to electricity usage ... (just had solar PV panels fitted so I'm bit paranoid about kilowatt-hours at present!) As the dehumidifier works much like a fridge, i imagine its electricity usage will be much the same i.e. not too bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I selected that one based on reviews and the temperature in my garage in winter. the rotor drier is more efficient at low temp. however the compressor based ones are more power friendly, but comparing the effectiveness in low temperature i believe they may be quite even. power is too cheap here in the rainy scandinabia to care to much, we are hydro based, and the fixed fee will be half the bill anyway, so think its worth a more pleasant environment in the "workshop" and hopefully less rust in the long run... probably does not help that i started driving again after "winter" in late february. Increadibly mild and rainy this winter. probably quite similar to the scottish environment.:blob7:

abt. 650 Watts, 220V , this will give you 15.6 kWh over 24 hour period. x your cost per kWh + fixed costs on the power bill.

http://www.rapidtables.com/calc/electric/watt-to-kwh-calculator.htm
 
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