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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Why I'm asking is because I only had CDI failure symptoms for 1 or 2 km and then I put my spare CDI in.

Basically what happened was my battery is in very bad shape and isn't holding a charge,
the last 3 days the battery was even worse.

I was on my way to a motorcycle shop to get a new battery then 1-2 km before the shop one of the cylinders was turning on and off rapidly and the rpm needle was going crazy,

When I reached the shop I swapped one of the CDIs with my spare and all was ok.

Finally the shop didn't have the right battery for my bike so I had to drive 7km to my hostel on the old battery,
the bike ran like normal.
I'm not going to drive the bike until I get a new battery, I think the dead battery is causing stress on the electrical system and caused the CDI to go ?

Or is it possible that the CDI could temporally not work because of the battery issue?

I still have the "broken" CDI but not sure if I should bin it or not.


And yes my rectifier is working :)



Traveling The World Two Up on a 1989 Africa Twin 650.

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With a dead battery, the reg/rec will try to put charge into it by raising the charging voltage. The battery won't hold the charge, so the voltage will stay high until you replace it. It's possible that this has damaged the CDI, but I wouldn't bin it until you are sure. Get the battery and charging circuit sorted first, then check all the main connections are sound; then you can swap the CDIs over and see if the old one is indeed toast. You'll need to get the battery sorted whatever you do, so what's to lose by keeping the CDI for now? If it works, you have a spare:thumbup:

If you haven't already, check the alternator-to-reg/rec connector for heat damage. The constant high charging will have given it a hard time, and they are a known weak point. If it's cooked, chop it out and solder the wires. One less thing to go wrong in future. Safe travels:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
With a dead battery, the reg/rec will try to put charge into it by raising the charging voltage. The battery won't hold the charge, so the voltage will stay high until you replace it. It's possible that this has damaged the CDI, but I wouldn't bin it until you are sure. Get the battery and charging circuit sorted first, then check all the main connections are sound; then you can swap the CDIs over and see if the old one is indeed toast. You'll need to get the battery sorted whatever you do, so what's to lose by keeping the CDI for now? If it works, you have a spare:thumbup:

If you haven't already, check the alternator-to-reg/rec connector for heat damage. The constant high charging will have given it a hard time, and they are a known weak point. If it's cooked, chop it out and solder the wires. One less thing to go wrong in future. Safe travels:thumbup:
Thanks for the info,
Good idea,
il get the new battery and in few days il swap the CDIs over and see what happens


Traveling The World Two Up on a 1989 Africa Twin 650.

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A dead battery doesn't make the regulator voltage go high.

On a shunt regulator, most automotive regulators, the output voltage is independent of battery voltage, in fact a battery is not even needed. Except to start the bike. Once engine speed gets to 4to 5k rpm you have all the volts you are going to get if the reg is working. Increased load can reduce voltage as the regulator only has a max power at each level of engine revs.

Voltage tends to go high with regulator faults.

A cdi won't work properly at low voltages which if your battery is broken and you aren't making enough power from the stator etc will happen. It can be permanently damaged from high voltages and whilst possible is less likely from low voltages.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
A dead battery doesn't make the regulator voltage go high.

On a shunt regulator, most automotive regulators, the output voltage is independent of battery voltage, in fact a battery is not even needed. Except to start the bike. Once engine speed gets to 4to 5k rpm you have all the volts you are going to get if the reg is working. Increased load can reduce voltage as the regulator only has a max power at each level of engine revs.

Voltage tends to go high with regulator faults.

A cdi won't work properly at low voltages which if your battery is broken and you aren't making enough power from the stator etc will happen. It can be permanently damaged from high voltages and whilst possible is less likely from low voltages.
Thank you for the very helpful information!
Today I rode about 200km with lots of stops on a new battery, all was well ?


Traveling The World Two Up on a 1989 Africa Twin 650.

Updates Here:
www.instagram.com/Africa.Twin.Adventures
www.facebook.com/DHealy91
 
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