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Well the only real cockup of my recent build has come to light and that's the BBQ. I've built it too wide.

I built the first one about 15 years ago and I don't remember cutting the blocks on the first course as it was exactly 2 blocks wide. Well either blocks have got about 15mm longer or I did cut them but regardless its now about 25mm too wide and the grill isn't long enough for the hooks.

I did cut a slice of a 1" paving slab and fitted that to the inside but it looks crap. What I really need is something thinner that I can put on both sides and that way it evens things up. I was looking at cement board but at 6mm I'd need two layers each side.

Any idea what other sheet material I can use that 10-15mm thick and fireproof? I don't mind if it's not weatherproof as I can remove it when not in use.
 

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I'm looking for something similar: I've built one out of an old Calor gas bottle and I'm looking for some fireplates to protect the steel. Options are:

1. GRG (Glass reinforced gypsum) board from the builder's merchant. Fireproof, but thin: I have seen it in 10mm panels.

2. Ceramic floor tiles. Don't know if they will work, got a couple spare and was thinking of begging some old/damaged ones from the local tile shop to try out.

3. Fireclay plates. They go inside wood burning stoves, come in various sizes and will take the heat. I've seen square ones somewhere that you cut to size yourself, but can't remember where. Getting old.

4. Steel plate. Sacrificial, but at 10mm thick will last pretty well.

ps. A tip for cleaning the metal grids: let them cool and put them on the ground where the cat can get at them. Never had to clean ours. Just don't let the guests see.
 

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I suspect ceramic floor tiles would crack/shatter when they got hot,and the thought of flying shards of tile is not pleasant.
Could you just insert metal pegs to support the "shelves" ... stainless or perhaps offcuts of brass, if corrosion would be a problem with mild steel?
 

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Craigypops
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Gordon, i don't know if he can help but it might be worth PM'ing Derek (palerider) i know he does testing at our works and they are always messing about with different metals for the gaskets and heatshields to see how they react to heat/pressure etc so he might be able to snaffle a bit if you give him the dimensions. I'll email him at work tomorrow and point him towards this thread :thumbup:



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whys the rum always gone?
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winxp-master;629150point him towards this thread :thumbup:[/QUOTE said:
OH NO YOU DONT look what happened the last time you pointed him to something then fecked off:toothy10::toothy10::toothy10::toothy10::toothy10::toothy10:
 

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SHW'MAE BUTT
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Just go to a steel stockist and buy a good plate of stainless or some 10mm steel off cut.:-D
 

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I suspect ceramic floor tiles would crack/shatter when they got hot,and the thought of flying shards of tile is not pleasant.
Yes, that thought occurred to me, too. I was going to test one, just in case. The manufacturers say they can be used next to a fire: I'm not sure about under/touching the coals. Reckon the mild steel plate is the best bet.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yes, that thought occurred to me, too. I was going to test one, just in case. The manufacturers say they can be used next to a fire: I'm not sure about under/touching the coals. Reckon the mild steel plate is the best bet.
I'm looking for something above the firebox. That is ok as it sits on bars. It's the little hooks that hold the grill in place that are too far apart



You can see the slab I've cut and put in but while it works it looks crap as it's only at one side. Even if I could find something half as thick and put it both sides would be better and I could even remove it when the BBQ is not in use if it was aesthetically displeasing.

At a push I could just space out the hooks a bit but that would leave huge gaps at the side of the grill and I already lose enough food into the coals without a huge gaps that spacers would bring. Longet pins would work but again the gaps would be huge.

Metal plates would work but could end up costing so much I'd be as well demolishing and starting again.

What about cut stone used in floor tiles do you think they would be up to the task?
 

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Craigypops
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SHW'MAE BUTT
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Chad if you weren't so big i'd be threatning to slap you!... as it is, i'll just give you a stern warning, yeah thats it, a finger wagging warning!...
Dont hold back Craig, he is disabled for a while just go down and pull his arms off.:toothy10::toothy10:
 

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Craigypops
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I'm looking for something above the firebox. That is ok as it sits on bars. It's the little hooks that hold the grill in place that are too far apart



You can see the slab I've cut and put in but while it works it looks crap as it's only at one side. Even if I could find something half as thick and put it both sides would be better and I could even remove it when the BBQ is not in use if it was aesthetically displeasing.

At a push I could just space out the hooks a bit but that would leave huge gaps at the side of the grill and I already lose enough food into the coals without a huge gaps that spacers would bring. Longet pins would work but again the gaps would be huge.

Metal plates would work but could end up costing so much I'd be as well demolishing and starting again.

What about cut stone used in floor tiles do you think they would be up to the task?
I wouldn't use stone as it's more likely to shatter in the heat: at least ceramic floor tiles have been cooked in a kiln.

I had a look in the builder's merchant yesterday: you can get mouldable fireclay in a 5kg tub. You hammer it into a mould, let it dry, then heat gently to cure. Will take 1600degC (allegedly!). Made by Percy-Doughty, they make lots of fire-proof stuff, so may be worth checking them out.

Could you lengthen the pins and put some metal strips on either side of the grids as food deflectors? Naff idea?

Don't want to be a killjoy, but are you happy with the fire tolerance of the concrete blocks? I've found the standard building blocks go all crumbly if they get really hot. A heat barrier between them and the fire may well be a useful thing to have. You could use a thinner metal sheet with a small air-gap between it and the blocks. This is often done to protect chimney walls from the heat of un-insulated flues, so I know it works. 3 to 5mm plate would probably do. Use mild steel, it's pretty cheap, and cover it in oil when first heated: it cooks on and helps stop it rusting. (Thats cooking oil, not 10/40!) Drill bigger holes in the plate than you need, to allow for expansion, or just use hooks: you can take the plates out for the winter then.

This week, I will mostly be found at the local scrap yard.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I wouldn't use stone as it's more likely to shatter in the heat: at least ceramic floor tiles have been cooked in a kiln.

I had a look in the builder's merchant yesterday: you can get mouldable fireclay in a 5kg tub. You hammer it into a mould, let it dry, then heat gently to cure. Will take 1600degC (allegedly!). Made by Percy-Doughty, they make lots of fire-proof stuff, so may be worth checking them out.

Could you lengthen the pins and put some metal strips on either side of the grids as food deflectors? Naff idea?

Don't want to be a killjoy, but are you happy with the fire tolerance of the concrete blocks? I've found the standard building blocks go all crumbly if they get really hot. A heat barrier between them and the fire may well be a useful thing to have. You could use a thinner metal sheet with a small air-gap between it and the blocks. This is often done to protect chimney walls from the heat of un-insulated flues, so I know it works. 3 to 5mm plate would probably do. Use mild steel, it's pretty cheap, and cover it in oil when first heated: it cooks on and helps stop it rusting. (Thats cooking oil, not 10/40!) Drill bigger holes in the plate than you need, to allow for expansion, or just use hooks: you can take the plates out for the winter then.

This week, I will mostly be found at the local scrap yard.
The fire tolerance of the blocks should be fine as the last one lasted 15 years without problems and I only knocked it down as I was building the workshop where it lived.

I'm beginning to come round to a thin(ish) plate on stand-offs each side to fill the gap. I think it would look functional rather than a bodge to hide a cockup and 2mm or 3mm steel sheet should be a good bit cheaper than 10mm plate
 

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I'm beginning to come round to a thin(ish) plate on stand-offs each side to fill the gap. I think it would look functional rather than a bodge to hide a cockup and 2mm or 3mm steel sheet should be a good bit cheaper than 10mm plate
Yep, simple, cheap and reliable. I'd think 3mm: 2mm is a bit too thin.
 
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