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Discussion Starter #1
Hi anyone changed the output shaft and if so anything to look out for.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Pretty much to the last nut and bolt, I'm just looking for any unexpected horrors as I strip it down.
 

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How do I tell if the output shaft has been changed ? Did they produce a shaft of a bigger diameter or just better hardening. Was there a recall ? If so , how do i check if my new purchase has had all work done ??
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I'd rather swap engines than fully strip and rebuild one, either that or weld the sprocket on.
I understand where you are coming from but I know that my engine is in perfect condition, uses no oil has no rattles and gets me around 60mpg and as a time served mechanic the job doesn't faze me at all.

I'll be ordering one of those Sprockets thay look good.
 

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I understand where you are coming from but I know that my engine is in perfect condition, uses no oil has no rattles and gets me around 60mpg and as a time served mechanic the job doesn't faze me at all.

I'll be ordering one of those Sprockets thay look good.

Good on yer man I admire your spirit be sure to post how the job goes :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Good on yer man I admire your spirit be sure to post how the job goes <img src="http://www.xrv.org.uk/forums/images/smilies/thumbsup.gif" border="0" alt="" title="thumbup" class="inlineimg" />
Good or bad I'll put another post up at the moment I've took the heat guard from the exhaust and I've had to drill them all out.🤣🤣🤣
 

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I too have ordered and recieved my front sprocket it looks good fitted to my bike
if it lasts as good as it looks it will be a good un
Thanks for the link
neil
 

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Apologies for not posting sooner . . .

I'm found out the output shafts are a known weak point on these bikes a little too late, but even that knowledge wouldn't have saved me from having to replace mine. Despite having half a clue about mechanical stuff (I've rebuilt several engines) I managed to fit an aftermarket sprocket the wrong way round. Admittedly I'd never seen a sided sprocket before - by which I mean it had a fat side and a flat side - but fitting it the wrong way round meant the chain was very slightly out of straight . . . just far enough out to wobble the sprocket. Over 5,000+ miles or so, that wobble pretty much tore the teeth off the shaft. Since the bike is my only mode of transport for work, I didn't have much choice other than to get the shaft replaced.

Parts cost about £400 - the shaft itself was about £180, along with new seals, head gaskets, bearings, bolts and so on. The bike has around 20,000 miles on it, so the internals and consumables were still in spec. but if yours is older, expect that cost to rise as you buy more bits. Labour was about three times that figure.

If you're going to try the job yourself and you're competent with spanners, stripping the engine isn't likely to cause you too much trouble; they're much like any other engine, although unlike older Honda engines, the cases split vertically. Annoyingly, the vertical split mean the heads/barrels/camchains and so on need to come off before you can get into the engine and actually do the changeover work. The changeover itself should also be pretty straightforward - just make sure the internal gears mesh properly.

The big problem you're likely to encounter is getting the engine out because the rear engine bolt has a nasty habit of seizing in place. My mechanic tells me Honda don't really believe in greasing those things, and they're prone to freezing to the point where they need cutting out. I got lucky with mine - it ultimately came out without the need for oxy torches, but fighting with it added another hour or so's labour to a seven to nine hour job . . . along with the cost of another bolt.

One thing this experience did teach me was not to use aftermarket front sprockets. Honda's own are double sided; the cog section is sandwiched between two fat shoulders (maybe they knew the output shaft teeth/metallurgy wasn't as good as it really should be). That design, coupled with the exact cutout makes sure the load is spread more evenly across the teeth/shaft. They're not cheap - I think mine was fifty quid - but knowing the cost of fixing the damage less well designed sprockets can cause, I know where I'm putting my money.
 

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sounds painful

i think unless the bike has under 20,000 miles i would probably not spend the money fixing it.
 

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I think unless the bike has under 20,000 miles i would probably not spend the money fixing it.
Agreed. I can't say I'd recommend the route I took to get it fixed - in investment terms it's not really money well spent - but at the time my options were limited. My preference would have been to do the work myself but life was getting in the way and I simply didn't have the energy or the patience when it happened.

Swapping engines can be a good option assuming you've got some idea of the history of the replacement and the shaft hasn't been damaged. But if I knew then what I know now, I'd probably have looked for another bike altogether.
 

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The response about both using after market sprockets is rather sort sighted. This counter shaft erosion issue happens to all transalp models and I've heard of it on other models. The issue (mentioned in another post) is to much chain tension. My 2003 650 and I have traveled over 175,000km together, only the first 2 front sprockets were genuine, the counter shaft is original and has none of that erosion.
When the rear suspension compresses and the chain doesn't have enough slack the chain becomes tight and something has to give for the rest of that compression, some of it becomes damage tho the chain, the rest becomes wear of the counter shaft.
After every visit to a bike ship for tyres or servicing I make sure that the chain has enough slack because most bike mechanics treat Transalps as road bikes that only need 25mm or so of chain slack.
 

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The response about both using after market sprockets is rather sort sighted. This counter shaft erosion issue happens to all transalp models and I've heard of it on other models. The issue (mentioned in another post) is to much chain tension. My 2003 650 and I have traveled over 175,000km together, only the first 2 front sprockets were genuine, the counter shaft is original and has none of that erosion.
When the rear suspension compresses and the chain doesn't have enough slack the chain becomes tight and something has to give for the rest of that compression, some of it becomes damage tho the chain, the rest becomes wear of the counter shaft.
After every visit to a bike ship for tyres or servicing I make sure that the chain has enough slack because most bike mechanics treat Transalps as road bikes that only need 25mm or so of chain slack.

That's fair comment jackflash about bike shops and tight chains but its a bit idiotic when so called proffesional mechanics don't actually know the specified chain play for any make/model they are working on.

Can I ask if you used grease and of any particular type on the shaft splines.
 

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I'm sorry but this theory about a tight chain causing drive shaft wear is a total crock. A tight chain would cause premature drive shaft bearing failure and i haven't read a single post of bearing failure on any of the bikes with a worn drive shaft i'm convinced the problem is caused by a poor hardening process during the manufacture of the drive shaft. I of course have no proof of this the same as there is no proof of the tight chain theory. For some reason people like to blame the owners for this rather than the manufacturers
 

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I don't know about Hondas hardening processes for the output shaft & sprocket, but I do know that the fit between the two parts, & the fixing method allows some movement & causes 'fretting' in use. An over tight chain won't help this situation, & I see a lot of long-travel suspension bikes with chains adjusted too tightly. I fitted a KK sprocket to my low mileage 650 last year in order to prevent undue wear. The KK sprocket is a far superior design. To answer T Alper's question about grease, I used Molykote BR2 on the splines. I've used this on industrial spline drives with good results.:thumbup:
Chris
 
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