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Chris i believe once there is movement between the shaft splines and sprocket friction from opening and closing the throttle will accelerate the wear so a grease like your using is a must. I also like the KK sprocket i'm going to get one for my AT:thumbup:
I've also thought that not greasing the shaft and leaving the bike to sit for long periods will allow the shaft to rust which in turn removes the hardened surface of the shaft a fraction at a time all of which makes more sense to me than a tight chain
 

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Its always been my thought that the shaft splines wear with the fretting action you mention I've always used a type of extreme pressure grease on them and have always run the chain at max. or a little more adjustment. My 650 has only done 32,000 and there is no wear on the splines.

The sprocket to shaft setup might have been better designed as an interference fit whereby the sprocket needed pushing/sweating on and then pulling off so giving no movement between them, don't know though if the little bit of sideways play helps at all with chain alignment.
 

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Fretting looks like a very good explanation to how the wear starts as the sprocket is a tight fit on the shaft when new and fretting involves very small movements between the two metal surfaces. I can visualize once they wear and start clonking back and fore when operating the throttle things start getting worse. I have seen allot of worn drive shaft photos with a sort of cocoa powder coloured corrosion associated with fretting. Grease will help prevent the oxidization and reduce friction. All this talk has prompted me to order a couple of KK sprockets which i will be fitting with Castrol molub alloy paste and i shall be whipping the sprocket off my CRF1000L and making sure that's lubed up as well :thumbup:
 

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is this the KK sprocket? it looks wider than an OEM one?. does this interfere with the sprocket cover?

honda-xlv600650700-transalp-fsprocket-superpinion.jpg
 

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Yes it uses the full length of the splines on the shaft almost doubling what the standard sprocket uses and in theory spreads the load giving the splines an easier life. not sure about the sprocket cover clearance as i haven't fitted one yet but i'm sure they would have looked at that when designing it:thumb:
 

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No clearance problems when i fitted mine. Also, as well as using the full length of splines, it's a much closer fit on the shaft, eliminating any chance of movement. I went up 1 tooth on the sprocket to raise the gearing slightly, having removed the PAIR system & exhaust subchamber.
 

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you mean you went one tooth less on the front to raise the gearing? (ie lower revs at motorway speeds)
 

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No, I went 1 tooth more on the front, (15 to 16 from memory), to lower the revs! The PAIR & subchamber mods give a noticeable torque increase so the higher gearing is not a problem.
 

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Think about this: The first thing on many Hondas that will move as the chain tightens up is the sprocket. On a Kawasaki or a Hyosung or a Yamaha (one of each in my shed) where the front sprocket is secured tightly against a shoulder on the countershaft, the bearing has to take all of the load, but on the Honda the sprocket has movement to allow for small amounts of chain misalignment. I'll try to link a part on the Transalp.org site that was posted by a bike mechanic who works on and owns various Honda dirt bikes, all acquired second hand and with varying degrees of shaft wear.
As mentioned elsewhere, once the "fretting" starts, it will be made worse by other issues. If the shaft is the issue then my 650 with over 175,000km or ymracing's transalp.org & from Illinois) 600 with over 140,000mi should both be stuffed but both are in good shape.

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Not my words, the words of a bike mechanic regarding Honda output shafts. I've borrowed this from Transalp.org:
The fixes that you see for worn shaft repair I consider to be temporary fixes. The might be holding now, but I would never ride across the country with one. I also tend to ride my bike harder than the average TA.

The thing to look for is how sloppy the sprocket fits on the shaft. And then be careful because some guys just weld the sprocket to the shaft. That's not good either. If you can take the gear shifter off and the sprocket cover then put the bike in gear and try to roll it. you will see the sprocket move on the shaft. A little is OK, A lot is not. Below are pictures of shafts I have or will be working on. My TA 600 is worn, but I would not change it yet except that I'm doing other work on it and decided to do that at the same time. My XR650L was so bad I thought it was going to fall off so I tore it down and changed the shaft. The XRV750 I found on ebay and was surprised to see it completely striped as the XRV750 uses a larger shaft than the 600/650s.

There is an outfit that makes a wider sprocket for the TA that uses all of the spline area. I will be using one of those when I install the new shaft in my TA.


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Think about this: The first thing on many Hondas that will move as the chain tightens up is the sprocket. On a Kawasaki or a Hyosung or a Yamaha (one of each in my shed) where the front sprocket is secured tightly against a shoulder on the countershaft, the bearing has to take all of the load, but on the Honda the sprocket has movement to allow for small amounts of chain misalignment. I'll try to link a part on the Transalp.org site that was posted by a bike mechanic who works on and owns various Honda dirt bikes, all acquired second hand and with varying degrees of shaft wear.
As mentioned elsewhere, once the "fretting" starts, it will be made worse by other issues. If the shaft is the issue then my 650 with over 175,000km or ymracing's transalp.org & from Illinois) 600 with over 140,000mi should both be stuffed but both are in good shape.

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The shafts were probably made in batches so my thoughts on the shaft being poor quality would only affect the bikes with the shaft fitted from the bad batch explaining why some bikes had wear and others didn't, but the more i read about fretting the more it makes sense. I've seen a Kawasaki Versys with a worn shaft and the sprocket is bolted on so not able to move like the Honda one but had the tell tale brown powder on the sprocket associated with fretting.
 

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This is an old fix I tries about four years and 5,000 miles ago. I checked the sprocket for the first last month and was very surprised that it is still solid on the shaft. Just make sure you have the correct grade of thread locker.
Chris W
 
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