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Discussion Starter #1
So I left the hazards on for an hour and fifteen minutes, then found the battery reluctant to turn the engine over.

Is this a sign of a battery on its way or was I pushing it with the hazards ?

It's an eighteen month old 700 by the way which I ride year round and has the Honda Averto alarm

Just wondering whether to change it out before the heavy winter ahead. Anyone know if the battery is covered under the two year warranty ?

Ta muchly
 

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Indicator bulbs tend to be 21W, so at 12V that is 1.75A current draw when they are on.

Assuming it's an equal on-off pattern, you are pulling approx 0.9A.

You're battery should be able to deliver this for several hours (bike batteries are around 12Ah rating usually, but after 12 hours delivering 1A it will be proper dead, not just "a bit sluggish")

It all depends on what state of charge your battery was in to begin with - and why you needed your hazards on!

If you've ridden it regularly, an 18 month old battery should be fine.

If you want to check your charging system, take a look at this post:

http://www.xrv.org.uk/forums/transa...rging-system-transalp-600-a-2.html#post509783
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is that taking into account that there are four of them ?

Oh and hazards keep the ticketing nazi's at bay in London, honest I'm a courier !!

Luckily found myself at the top of a hill, never push started a bike before !
 

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Ah, good call on the number of indicators - I really shouldn't try thinking before 9am!

The indicators (whilst in hazard mode) are likely to be wired in pairs, so the current draw would be around 1.8A. A healthy battery should be able to cope with this for an hour.

However, the C word ("courier", not the other one!) means that your battery is having a damn hard life. Lots of starts, with short dashes in between, and rarely any sustained engine revs. 18 months of this and the battery is starting to show it's age.

David Silver show batteries at £53.82 inc VAT & P&P - I imagine a days lost work is a bit more than this, so I'd change it.

Not sure if the 700 has a standard flasher relay - if so, change it for an LED flasher unit (Hein Gericke do them for around £15) and change your indicators for LEDs. Then the current draw will be maybe 0.1 A, and you can flash to your heart's content.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Steve, not really a courier - just pretend, to stay clear of tickets :)

Gave her a good run afterward and she seems ok for the mo, I think I'll pay a visit to my mech
 

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Let's just make a comparison here...

4x21W bulbs = 84 Watts

That's 7 Amps when they're all lit up - 24 watts more than having the headlight and tail light on.

Okay, they're only on half the time, but they take extra current to start up too. I'd expect them to flatten the battery slightly less quickly than having the headlight on but I'm not surprised at a sluggish start after an hour of that drain.
 

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I'd give the battery a good service and stick take it off the bike and stick it on an Optimate (or alike).

Better still if you've got a garage with power leave it on the bike, attach the static lead connector to the battery and plug it in whenever you get a chance to to maintain the health of your battery.

I've done this every winter of the Christmas break to all of my bikes after being let down once upon a time.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Skid thanks for the heads up.

Sadly no power in he Garage. I have got a quicklock power socket however which apparently I can use to charge the battery via the lighter socket it provides.

Am I right in thinking that there are devices which I can charge in doors and then take them out to the garage to plug in ?

Had a quick look but found nowt

Thanks all
 

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Same as me and that's why I take my batteries off. It's is worth the effort as I've only ever been let down the once in the last 10 years, that's 4 bikes and 1 new battery required.

Not sure about the quicklock as it's part of a 'powered-up' system but if there's an adapter from the hook up in the bag to a charger of sorts it should act the same as the Optimate static lead if it's hooked directly onto your battery.

As for the device that you can charge indoors, there is one as my dad has one but it's only for jump starting not for charging.

The Optimate not only charges your battery but restores it and lets you know if it is damaged in anyway thus letting you know it's about to let you down before it actually does.
 

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Clarkes do a jump starter that has an accessory socket which can be used for slaving a battery.
I use a solar charger, it supplies a charge that compensates for the use of the clock while the bike is not in use.
 
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