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bimbler
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello from another new AT guy. I've just got my first AT (RD07) with the intention of going traveling (at some point!) on it. As i'm new to the bike, I decided to give it a service and general check.

The first thing that i noticed was that the rear shock had the spring wound to the "max height" end. When i ride the bike solo, I weigh about 80kg. And two up, about 140kg. So does anyone know where the spring should be adjusted to?
The next thing that i noticed was that the gearbox output shaft seems to be slightly worn. There is approx a 0.5mm step on the splined shaft, and the front sprocket (original honda) moves slightly. Does this mean, much to my horror, that soon I will have to replace the shaft, or is there some way to avoid it?

Also, as talked about in another post, the front right brake calliper doesn't seem to be working too good either. The left brake disk has a good polished look, where as the right disk is not so polished, and is slightly coloured, as though the pad is touching the disk, but not enough to work. I also thought that I had a problem with the rectifier, but it turned out to be some burnt connections on the end of the rectifier wires. Cleaned it all up, now and I have 14.2v at the battery with main beam and heated grips on.

Other than those few problems, i'm loving the AT. It so much more comftable than the super four that i've just progressed from. And the bike has sooooo much presence on the road, I cant wait to try it off the tarmac

Cheers.

Stu.
 

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I have the standard rear shock set near max preload - this seems to suit the bike for a mix of solo and pillion riding. AT's tend to steer a bit like a barge, so stopping the back sagging helps.

The Honda design of sprocket retention on these bikes means that there is normally movement anyway.

Sticking brakes is par for the course if you ride in winter. You should be able to grab the caliper and feel play when you rock it on the pins - if not you'll have to unbolt the calipers and clean and grease the pins. If the caliper is free to move on the pins, try pushing your knee onto the caliper side while grabbing the wheel - you should be able push the caliper over a little way, so that you have to pump the brake lever to get it back again. If not, you'll have to clean up the brake pistons.

Nick
 

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bimbler
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, managed to sort out the brake problem. I bled the right hand calliper, and now the pad seems to be doing a fine job of polishing the disk.

Im still a little concerned about the play in the front sprocket though. Think I may have to take it somewhere to get a second opinion.

Cheers.

Stu.
 

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About that front sprocket: I had some play with my old sprocket, but upon changing a fresh one the problem went away.

If the spleens are badly deteriorated one option is to weld material on them and then dremel the groowes back on. This is laborous but not as much as taking apart the engine to get the shaft out. Gotta be careful with the heat though...

I'm the same weight as you and 6ft tall. I find rear suspension supple and bike high enough with the preload set so that when on side stand the preload just about begins to compress the spring (one turn or so from slack).

Those rectifier connectors are a pain. I cut out the original connector and socket, and replaced with spade connectors AND lots of insulation.
 

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samih said:
About that front sprocket: I had some play with my old sprocket, but upon changing a fresh one the problem went away.
Yes, I recognise that problem. I also replaced the rentainer plate (in case yours looked like mine: The teeth of the new ones are actually square and of the same thickness as the plate!). But still a bit of play left. The gap on the shaft where the sprocket fits in was simply too wide, due to wear. In the end I simply put washers on the bolts (I just luuurve my washers :geek: ) between the plate and the sprocket, effectively reducing the gap. Most of the play has gone now. Not exactly the "Grand Prix" approach but it works for me :cheers:
 
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