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Discussion Starter #1
It's probably the wrong time of year (hopefully) to rabbit on about heated grips, but I think I've found a solution to a glitch with the official Honda grips I fitted several years back. The problem was that all three red lights on the control panel would flash rapidly and for no apparent reason. If I reduced the heating level on the control panel, the flashing stopped, but the grips didn't warm up as much as I remembered from when I first fitted them. A temporary fix was to run the heated grips earth lead direct to the battery, rather than using the small wiring harness (supplied) which connects the earth wire to the left hand indicator earth. I think this sort of worked, but maybe it was wishful thinking! Recently whilst fitting some Givi spotlights and whilst I was in full wiring mode, I modified the grip wiring as follows:

a. Connect the positive and negative leads from the grips direct to the appropriate battery terminal.

b. Insert a relay in the positive wire to the grips and use the two supplied wiring harnesses (one to earth on the left hand indicator and the other to the front brake stop light switch power supply wire) to operate the relay. The grips are thus switched off when the ignition is turned off. The relay fits very nicely in a redundant hole on the right hand side of the instrument panel support plate, just behind the upper fairing.

Most, if not all of the existing grip wiring needed to be extended, so I have learned how to solder.

I tried them out on a cold day recently and the three red lights, came on, stayed on and best of all, the grips worked as I remembered them. I'm really looking forward to winter now!
 

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Glad you got it sorted. Many problems are caused by poor earths and strange routing.

On every bike I've ever owned I've fitted a 30A 'accessory relay' directly to the battery via a fuse. Usually under the seat and actived by something that goes live when the ignition is on, like the rear brake light switch.

The relay feeds a 'chocolate block' connector routed to all the toys...grips, gps, intercom, etc. And everything goes inside a plastic box.

Also because I've spent a lifetime playing with electronics, I have an tiny LED voltmeter on the bars. That way I can turn things off if the battery isn't getting a charge on a cold winter's day, or see if the alternator has crapped out.

Cheers, Shorty.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply, Shorty. I've got a Gammatronix battery monitoring light on my AT for the same reason. But I like the idea of a voltmeter, so I'm off to scour the net for one!
 

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Yes I've never really got on with the multi-colour LED displays. I want to know exactly what voltage the system is at, and make my own decisions. The 'unloaded' state of the bike can be as high as 14.8 v, but I always run with the headlight on in the daytime and this brings it back down to a reasonble level.

Here's a fuzzy pic of my voltmeter - which is waterproof. It's encased in resin. IIRC correctly I bought it 2nd hand off eBay for a few quid quite a while back.

LED Volts.jpg

Cheers, Shorty.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the picture: I'm convinced. I have ordered a voltmeter from the interweb so that I can use my new found soldering skills: I fitted some Givi lights recently and had to modify the harness supplied. Similarly to you I have constructed a fuse protected junction box system to avoid sending every (new) wire on the bike to the positive battery terminal. Grips, lights and everything else seems to work so far: or at least there's no blue smoke emanating from under the tank!!
 
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