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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is a test article for a new section we might have against each bike forum.

The original posts were from Yen and I've just cut them out, as you will see they aren't complete but are good to demo this method.



As I said last night, my rear wheel bearings were Donald Ducked so I shot to work this morning on the bike but tonight decided to swap my spare rear wheel (borderline tyre though) until I sort the bearings on the proper wheel.

Tonight I got the bike's back wheel in the air by using the side stand (as welded by St Chas of the Blessed Virgin's chastity) and placing a car axle stand under the right hand side of the swing arm.

I swapped the wheels over and set about removing the bearings which if anyone wants to know are the following codes/sizes (XRV750, RD07A, UK 2000 model)

6203
6204
6303

Here is a demo of bearing changing for the deaf, once again, one handed piccy taking.


Use a screwdriver to carefully prise out both seals.

You will need a hooge hammer and a nice flat ended drift like the one shown. Screwdrivers as used by 'professionals' will just cause you grief and take longer.

Use the drift to push the internal metal sleeve to one side so you can put the end on the lip of the opposite bearing. WHACK THE BUGGER SMARTLY. Then use the drift on the opposite side to push the sleeve again and repeat mit der wack. Move around the bearing in a criss cross pattern

If you've been careful and brutal at the same time the opposite bearing and the sleeve will have fallen onto the floor with a satisfying clunk.

The opposite wheel bearing can now be very easily knocked out after turning the wheel over.



The sprocket carrier (which should be lifted out before wacking commences, has it's own bearing. There is also a sleeve inside this bearing. This needs to be reused so tap it out carefully.

This is the sleeve above.

Two of the old bearings.
 

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286 Posts
If I may add something: put your new wheel bearings into the freezer a day before or at least when you start removing the old ones- it will be easier to put them in and they will take their original size automatically as their temperature is back to normal.

;)
 

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Bunkmuffin
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44 Posts
Ok I've got the spacer and the one bearing out of the hub. How do I remove the sprocket carrier?
Am I not seeing something obvious?

Bunkmuffin
 

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Bunkmuffin
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44 Posts
The sprocket carrier just pulls away from the main hub, may be held in by 'stiction' so try a rocking motion as you pull it away.

Phil
Thanks for the reply. I figured it out and removed all the bearings and seals.

Now to get new and install.
Should I replace the drive rubbers as well? The bike is a 92. They look good but they may have hardened up with age. Any recommendations would be appreciated.
Bunky
 

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I swapped the wheels over and set about removing the bearings which if anyone wants to know are the following codes/sizes (XRV750, RD07A, UK 2000 model)

6203
6204
6303
Just to clarify this:

There are different types of the bearings. 2RS, C3 (C0 = standard, C1/C2 = smaller, C3-C5 = larger) ...
2RS = Double rubber sealed
C3 = Larger internal radial clearances

From ATiC:

RD03
2x 6202-2RS1/C3 [Front]
2x 6203-2RS1/C3 [Rear 'left'] + [Rear 'right']
1x 6204-2RS1/C3 [Rear 'sprocket']

RD04/RD07
3x 6203-2RS1/C3 [2x Front] + [Rear 'right']
1x 6303-2RS1/C3 [Rear 'left']
1x 6204-2RS1/C3 [Rear 'sprocket']
 

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Old Body/ Young Head
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236 Posts
i saw a link on the site tother day showin bearing change on video. In it they recc prising the New Bearing seals out to chk if more grease might be needed in them (cos makers are mean with the grease sometimes !).

This "prising out" does deform the seals (and poss damage them if yr not really careful)

My preffered method is to drill a small hole in the seal (the "swarf " normally comes out in nice spiral), then "inject grease through the hole (using syringe filled with grease), clean the area with lighter fluid to degrease & fill the "fill hole" with silicone sealer.

Works a treat & good bearings can be re-packed using this method.

Also - i would never use my spindle as a "drift" to knock out bearings - use proper tool as shown above otherwise you could knacker the spindle thread !

Also - use a piece of wood on the spindle head to protect it if your using a hammer to knock it back in (or better still a mallet !)

Just my Five Penneth ! ;)
 

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This is a tool I made for removing wheel bearings easily.
The picture is a 20mm bolt cut down which I cut slot in with a disc cutter, 20mm is the inside diameter of the bearing on my gas gas, the bar I had laying about up my shed ( i collect bits of metal) which I cut into a wedge.


To use place the bolt into the bearing in the wheel and lay it on a hard surface then hammer the wedge into the slot to lock it into the bearing then lift the wheel up and hit the bar, this way the bearing comes out straight so no tapping each side a bit at a time risking damaging the hub. it’s easy to make and easy to use.


I know a lot of you already know this but I thought I might enlighten some that don’t.
Here's a video of it in use. excuse my awkwardness but for some reason I was nervous as hell when filming myself

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UIiUO7yq9Cg
 

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bigtrailie admin
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4,710 Posts
they recc prising the New Bearing seals out to chk if more grease might be needed in them (cos makers are mean with the grease sometimes !).
Its not always the case that more grease is better, If quality bearings are used like NSK for example there are what appear to be meager amounts of grease in them, but they are designed to run this way adding extra in there will only push out the seals and effectively shorten the life of the bearings :thumbup:
 

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sfx wheels
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806 Posts
i like " mit der wack "

the wacking bar is best 10 or 12 mm dia , and about 45 cm long , makes an easier job

lmao , i love this web site

regards to all on it

paul
 

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sfx wheels
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806 Posts
just a quickiee add on for longer life span of bearings

remove inner seal of each bearing , this allows more grease to actually get to the bearing races them selves , before packing with grease

old school stuff this

and drill and tap the hub for a grease nipple to allow it to be re filled

also try to NEVER EVER EVER DIRECTY POINT THE JETWASHER AT THE PLACE WHERE THE BEARINGS LIVE IN YOUR WHEELS

as this will dramatically reduce there life span
 

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Stone Crazy
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5,304 Posts
Another way to get em out is get a rawl bolt and do up inside the bearing then drive it out from tother side
 

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sfx wheels
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806 Posts
another good dodge for next time , is to cut a slight groove in either side of the spacer tube , with an angle grinder before putting the bearing assembly back togeather , makes removal and replacement much easier next time ,,,,,,,
 

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135 Posts
I am buying aftermarket seals and bearings.

Does anyone have measurements of Inner radius from Seal on the sprocket Side?

I damaged my old seal and can not be measured.
It would be around 25mm or 26mm or 27mm.

Thanks
 

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The Angry Pasty Muncher
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6,170 Posts
I can't be bothered finding things the correct size to beat bearing out and beat them back in again without damaging them. A few years ago i bought a bearing and seal drift kit from snap-on for £40 and an SP slideHAmmer with 8 (i think ) adaptors.

172.jpg

177.jpg

176.jpg

The cost weren't that expensive to buy and when doing a lot of bearing the amount of time you save outways the cost easily. Had them a few years now and they are worth there weight in gold. When replacing the bearings in the offroad bike wheels i always remove the seals and put extra grease in as the bikes are used to going through deep water and since doing so i've never had a bearing fail. The bearings come with the minimal amount of thin grease in them as they are designed for dry running, not being submerged in water with corrosive minerals like salt in it. I always pack them out with BEL-RAY anti-salt grease
 

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The Angry Pasty Muncher
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6,170 Posts
If your buying new bearings get them to supply the seals which match th ebearing all they will do is read it out the book or measure the bearing. What is the bearing number you want sizes for?

These will supply top end bearig at good prices

Industrial Products and Industrial Services
Brammer UK Ltd - Distributor of Industrial Engineering Products - Bearings, Pneumatics, Hydraulics, Belts, Pulleys, Chains, Sprockets, Gearboxes, Motors, Linear Motion, Seals, Clutches, Couplings Maintenance, Repair, Overhaul, MRO
 
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