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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have just upgraded our helmets and I’m in the process of fitting the autocom system, I have just realised that the intercom we have must be about 15 years old and connects with the curly leads, the unit is hard wired so no recharging batteries. So what advantage with the latest systems , I only use it for rider to pillion and sat nav instructions, question is how long do the batteries last, are they easy to fit, are they reliable and any suggestion to the best one to buy. Any help appreciated.
 

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its a bit quite on hear you should try advrider.com for a quicker response there is bound to loads of stuff about it to help you find the best quality and suitability for your needs good luck with it :thumbright:
 

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We have just upgraded our helmets and I’m in the process of fitting the autocom system, I have just realised that the intercom we have must be about 15 years old and connects with the curly leads, the unit is hard wired so no recharging batteries. So what advantage with the latest systems , I only use it for rider to pillion and sat nav instructions, question is how long do the batteries last, are they easy to fit, are they reliable and any suggestion to the best one to buy. Any help appreciated.
The single biggest advantage of modern intercoms is their wireless 'bluetooth' functionality. Verify that your satnav is capable of being configured to issue prompts via bluetooth or this feature is worthless. It can be a bit of a minefield as different gadgets may use a different 'protocol' (language) to connect with other gadgets like your smartphone, for example.

Based on your requirements, i'd go for a simple one to one type set up, which allows you to chat with a pillion, answer calls handsfree, listen and share MP3 or Wav music files (from the satnav or 'phone) and most importantly, receive prompts from the satnav above all else.

Battery charging and running times are much of a muchness...my basic Nolan unit last around 6 hours continued use. Pricier units do more and last a bit longer.
If you're touring, just remember to get into a routine.

Finally, streaming audio wirelessly is fine for general use, but if you're on a long tour and you really appreciate sound quality, don't expect hi fi from tiny speakers and a few milliamps of output. Wired earbuds are your best bet if using ipod or similar...but then your pillion can't hear. There are some top drawer bluetooth earbuds on the market, which look promising for motorcyclists, provided they keep the form factor low enough to fit under a helmet comfortably...Jaybirds Freedoms spring to mind (as used by gym bunnies the world over)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your advice, I’m still considering which unit to buy, I do only need a basic one so I will keep looking for a good deal.
 

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Thanks for your advice, I’m still considering which unit to buy, I do only need a basic one so I will keep looking for a good deal.
the manchester bike show is coming up pretty soon. You may be able to grab a bargain...or at least wangle a show price, following a demonstration, assuming there's someone selling there. Take your satnav and 'phone in to make sure it does what it says on the tin

http://www.manchesterbikeshow.com
 

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I use a sena smh10r its easy to use and get started lasts all day, then charge at night you can even charge on the go. Sound is fine and I use ear defenders and when I talk to anybody they cant believe Im on the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks but I bit the bullet and bought the Sena 20 s , only tried it once but it seems to be a good bit of kit.
 
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