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Do you want me to try and get you some cheap(er) choke plunger springs?

  • No, I think you're a tight arsed b*st*rd

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Any good?.... :toothy8:
 

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skeptical old git
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Discussion Starter #43
I've just fitted the D11480 springs. These are noticeably stiffer than the OE springs, but not hugely stiff - you can hold thenipple at the other end of the cable and pull the plungers in/out easily enough, so with the lever on it's fine.

But my choke is stuck on. No idea what I've done wrong; hard to see how the springs could be a problem other than (in theory) not allowing me to open the choke fully as they've longer than the originals. No way should they stop it closing.

The whole sorry tale related here
 

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skeptical old git
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Discussion Starter #44
icenian said:
I've just fitted the D11480 springs
I have now also tried the C-5503840. This fits OK, but the inner diameter is a bit too big so it doesn't "clamp" the cable onto the plunger tightly - it could come apart if the spring isn't under tension and the cable is free to move sideways, which shouldn't be possible when it's all assembled and screwed into the choke.

Haven't tried the C-6603980 but it's the biggest ID so would have the same problem, I suspect it would function when everything is fully assembeed though.
 

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Thanks Icenian....So D11480 Springs are the ones to go for?.....has any one else got round to fitting them yet?......any more stuck chokes?... :thunder: :teeth:
 

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skeptical old git
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Discussion Starter #46
My choke is still in a poor state (though better than it was), so I can't definitively tell you the springs work :(

Though I can't see how these new springs could possibly make things worse, and the D11480 definitely works on the rear carb.

Suppose the front cylinger could be running rich and it may not be the choke..?
 

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Just resurrecting an ancient thread.

Loads of research went into sourcing spare springs for choke plungers. Did they ever work?

I need new springs and honda do not supply them separately, now up to £62 for each set of springs plungers etc.:(

By coincidence the spring part number D11480 seems to be used in loads of Numatic vacuum cleaners, i have just ordered a couple to see if they fit at about 60p each.

I will keep you posted
 

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Just resurrecting an ancient thread.

Loads of research went into sourcing spare springs for choke plungers. Did they ever work?

I need new springs and honda do not supply them separately, now up to £62 for each set of springs plungers etc.:(

By coincidence the spring part number D11480 seems to be used in loads of Numatic vacuum cleaners, i have just ordered a couple to see if they fit at about 60p each.

I will keep you posted
Good call mate! - the chokes were something that I'd been thinking about (after the rear shock, countershaft, wheel rims... et al.) but a straightforward (i.e. affordable) fix is always good :thumb:

I'll check in, in anticipation - thanks :)
 

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skeptical old git
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Discussion Starter #49
The choke is a problem because
  • the choke cable tends not to run freely
  • the spring corrodes and goes weak
  • the plungers don't move freely
I can recommend the replacement springs (mentioned above) to tackle the problem with the springs. A stainless spring won't corrode, and since it is stiffer and longer it helps to shut the choke off (in theory the extra length may stop the choke opening fully, in practice this is not a problem).

A stronger spring mitigates the other two problems but a stiff cable or plunger could still be a problem. A replacement choke cable is not too expensive, and you can grease the plungers if they are not corroded yet, and if you're lucky that will get it working well.

Unfortunately the 90 degree bend at the end of the cable is not supplied with the new choke cable, that only comes in the Honda "starter valve kit" (over 60 GBP per carb). Also if the plungers are corroded then you need to buy that kit.

As someone has said you can replace the plastic nuts with metal ones from Rugged Roads, which is a good idea. It won't make anything work better, but avoids you having to buy the starter valve kit if you break one of the plastic nuts -- which you will inevitably do sooner or later.

The tricky thing is it can appear that everything is working 100% perfectly and you still get a sticky choke. Even if everything looks clean and appears to be free moving, you'll never know until you assemble it all and run the bike.

So, you will never solve the problem of having to do regular maintenance on the choke. All you can do it reduce the parts cost to something reasonable when you have to fix it. Just take lots of care of those plungers and 90-degree-bend parts!!!

I got tired of having to do this every few months so I ended up disabling the choke entirely. That works for me because the only time the bike doesn't start is when it's been sat for ages (at least overnight) and is really cold. As it only ever sits that long in the garage I can warm the engine with a fan heater for 5 minutes -- sounds mad, but dead easy to do and works like a charm. If I left the bike parked away from home overnight in winter then I'd probably get the choke working again.
 

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Just out of interest, how easy is "dead easy" when it comes to disabling the choke? Any easier than replacing the springs and servicing the cable?
 

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skeptical old git
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Discussion Starter #51
Just out of interest, how easy is "dead easy" when it comes to disabling the choke? Any easier than replacing the springs and servicing the cable?
Disassembly is the same amount of work.

Reassembly is easier, because you just fit the plastic nut, spring and plunger. With the cable out of the way you can just put a 10mm socket onto the nut and screw it in. The hole where the cable ran could let dirt in so block this with a blob of grease (I'd pack the space round the plunger and spring with grease too, but I ride all year round in Scotland).

It also makes life easier afterwards because you don't have to repeat the job every few months.

I thought about pulling the choke cable apart are the splitter and leave just the two short bits of cable connected (tucked under the tank, bit if tape around the end to keep dirt and water out). Reassembly would be just as easy as for the disabled choke: slide a socket over the free end of the cable and down to the plastic nut. Leaving the bit of cable on provides an easy way to use the choke in an emergency. I should think the cable run is short enough that you could push on the cable to force the plunger back in, rather than relying on springs, so the choke shouldn't seize on. Obviously you wouldn't want to do that every morning, but if you're 99.9% certain you can do without a choke but are worried you might get stuck if you leave the bike parked out in cold weather, it might be a good way to go?
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Just resurrecting an ancient thread.

Loads of research went into sourcing spare springs for choke plungers. Did they ever work?

I need new springs and honda do not supply them separately, now up to £62 for each set of springs plungers etc.:(

By coincidence the spring part number D11480 seems to be used in loads of Numatic vacuum cleaners, i have just ordered a couple to see if they fit at about 60p each.

I will keep you posted
Hello Machiru!

Just going thorugh the same Issue, I'd really love to know if these springs worked. What can you tell us after almost 6 years? Did they work? Did they last? Are they still functional?

Cheers!
Paul
 
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