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AfricAddict
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Discussion Starter #1
Ok guys, I've been reading around the forum lately and worked up an apetite for some quality time in the garage... ;)

So I've stripped all the fairings and I'm ready to start actually improving things (or hope to anyway)...

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The list:

Oil + flilter
Sparks
Air filter
Valve adjustment
Installation of a pair of progressive WP springs
Removal of the rear shock
Bar risers (I'll take them from the TA, they are 2cm)
Minor paint jobs
Clean the areas that never get cleaned

The background:
This is my first time servicing the AT (bought it fairly recently), and although the V52 is no stranger to me, I still need some help sorting things out.

The questions:

It's a '96 RD07, I'm too bored to look into haynes, so if anyone could give me the valve clearances I'd appreciate it.

My clutch basket has been very noisy, but I won't fix it just yet, I can't anyway by myself, too advanced for little me, but I was wondering if a thicker oil could make it a bit less noisy. I normally use motul 5100 15-50 which is great for Greece but i should try something else for the clutch?

I've read that many fellow AT owner have had problems with sticky choke cables, I don't have that problem (yet), but do you believe there are preventative steps? I was thinking of lubing the cable near the engine, would that work or would it prove ineffective?

Lastly, what do you use to clean the residual sticky oil mud around the sprockets? I normally use WD40 and patience, but I would love to hear about something more effective.

That's all for now, sorry for the long post and I look forward to hearing your thoughts. Thank you in advance!
 

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Hi, cold valve clearances are:

Intake: 0,15 ± 0.02 mm
Exhaust: 0,20 ± 0.02 mm

The front cylinder exhaust valve is a dog to adjust, you have to remove the right radiator bolts (3 bolts), snap that radiator's water hose out of its holding clip and support the hose on the horn to make room for adjustment.

While you're at the valve clearance checking you might as well get yourself a new set of o-rings for the valve adjusting covers as there are most likely flat from age.

Still on the valve adjusting theme, if like me, you are not able to remove the crankshaft plug in order to bring the cylinders to TDC of compression stroke (where all 3 valves are closed), you are better off by engaging 5th gear and turn the rear wheel to close the intake and exhaust valves in turns at both cyclinders and adjust the valves this way. The crankshaft plug on my 96 RD07a is too tight and the allen wrench just passes the hex pattern... and removing this plug is only needed to ajust the valve clearance anyway, so no major problems there provided you not have a leak at this spot. Do not install the plugs before doing the valve clearances so as to ease turning the engine via the rear wheel.

Regarding spark plugs replacement, the front cylinder front plug is also a dog if you don't have the articulated original spark plug socket; if you do have it, use a 10 mm socket spanner on the plug wrench but be very careful that your hand does not hit the left radiator or you might bend a few radiator fins... they can be straightened back with a small flat-tip screwdriver but it's a long and boring progress and you won't be able to put them like before anyway, so you might as well just be careful. Use your left hand to press the plug wrench onto the plug and twist the socket spanner slowly and steadily with the other hand. The 3 other plugs are no problem.

Regarding choke plungers, make sure you have them properly greased (silicone grease or vaseline - I used Dow Corning Relase Compound) and most important, make sure you have the right springs fitted. On the left side, I had a pen spring!!! :confused:
Also be careful when doing and undoing the black plastic choke nuts.
Use a 10 mm open end wrench and take your time (read below for further info).

While you're here, you might as well inspect the rubber carb isolators between carbs and engines as these are prone to leak a bit with time. A tell-tale sign is a yellow tint on the cylunder heads, right below the carbs.
Check them for cracks and fit them correctly and DON'T remove the small tube spacers from the clamps of the carbs rubbers. You might think that you can get a bit more of tightening grip from the clamp if you do, but in the end all you're doing is deforming the carbs rubbers, rendering them useless. Lightly grease them with silicone grease on both lips before installing; it'll ease the installation and aid to the sealing effect.
Note that the carbs are not instaled squarely onto the engine, in a back-to-front perspective, rather they are slightly twisted to the left side. If you don't notice this before removing them, you might be tempted to think they are wrongly fitted when you finally notice they sit a bit twisted to the left, if you know what I mean.

Here's the correct sequence for carbs installation on to the engine: correctly position both clampers on both rubbers (note the position of the clampers: one has a round head bolt the other has a hex head bolt. I can't remember which one goes on top, but I can check for you if you mix them), install the carbs rubbers to the carbs first, lightly tighten the clampers on the carbs side (the top clampers) (mind the bolt head positioning in relation to the side of the bike) and then press the carbs with the rubbers onto the cylinders; finally tighten the bottom clampers, once again noting the bolt heads direction. Get help from another person to check when the rubbers are fully seated. You'll feel them clicking into position anyway, but you're gonna need help again when installing the air filter box to the carbs.

Speaking of it, make you sure fully and correcly seat the air filter box tubes onto the carbs. Easier said than done. Here's what I did: lightly grease the air filter box tubes' lips with silicone grease and install the right side first and lightly tighten the clamper (once again, note the bolt head position). Then work your way with the left side. Note the small rib right at the middle of the side of carbs' lips: on both sides of the carbs, this must not be visible when the carbs are fully seated inside the air filter box tubes. With the right side correcly fitted (the rib is not visible on the full perimeter of the carb lip), work your way on the left side by applying pressure to the top of the air filter box.

Usually, the front side of the left rib pops out of the air filter tube as soon as you stop applying pressure on the top of the air filter as you go to tighten the left clamper for the air filter box... so here's where your helper comes in: while you apply steady pressure to the top of the air filter box, get him or her to hold a large flat-tip scredriver and keep pressing the front end of the air filter box left tube onto the carb and then you go and tighten the clamper screw but don't over do it because you'll make the tube pop out of the carb again. You might need to try a few times until it sits just right with the correct tightening.

This what I did on mine last Sunday...

The process involved:

-Fuel tank removal
-Air filter box removal and inspection, specially the ressonator chambers and at the places where the carbs tubes enter the air filter box; you might need to apply selant here and also to the ressonator where the 2 hoses connect, the existing sealant might be dry and cracked
-Carbs removal and cleaning, specially throttle valves linkages and vaccum pistons. A teflon spray works wonders on the vaccum pistons after cleaning with carb cleaning spray
-Spark plugs removal
-Valves adjustment (you need a 10 mm socket spanner and an universal pliers if you don't have the Honda special tool, a small square end spanner); check the valve adjusting covers' o-rings for flattening, specially the front cylinder exhaust valve, which gets the most heating; you can always take ther o-rings off and turn them over, but it's better to replace them
-Spark plug installation, do not overtighten, for brand new plugs, hand tight them until they're fully seated and them turn then a further 1/4 of a turn.
Install the rubbers to the carbs and then the lubed chokes by using the 10 mm open end wrench. Only then you should install the carbs to the engine. This way, the installation of chokes is much easier.
Then install the air filter box lke per rghe above.

While you're here, you might as well find a friend with a vaccum gauge and adjust carb synch and check the mix screws for both carbs; these are turned out 2 turns and 3/8 of a turn after fully in.
First adjust the mix screws and then sync the carbs. Mine synched at around 22 on the vaccum gauge.

Bike runs smoothly now. Dont's forget to replace you air cleaner also abd maybe the fuel filter too.

While you're with the maintenance bug, warm up your engine until the fan starts, turn your low beams on, set up with multimeter for 20V DC scale, put it to the battery and rev up to 5.000 rpm, hold it there and read the voltage while the colling fan is not working. You should read between 14 and 15 V which indicates your reg/rec is OK; other than this and there's something not right.
Also check the 3p plug with the yellow wires on the left side of the bike, behind the rear left cover. This is the alternator-to-reg/rec connector and it's a known weak spot, it's under-dimensioned and tends to burn and taking the reg/erc with it and possibly the rest of the electrical equipment.

Best option is ditch the connector altogheter and solder and isolate the yellow wires with shrink-wrap sleeve (order is not important on these wires as they carry AC and not DC).

Sorry for the long post, but I think I covered most important aspects of the maintenance

I work for the manufacturer and these tips are straight from the Original Shop Manual.

As usual, do it at your own risk etc... if you're not confident take it to a Dealer.
Questions welcomed, as far as my knowledge goes, I'll be glad to answer them.

Cheers. :)
 

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per cylinder - intake (x2) valve clearance 0.13-0.17 (bet u have only 0.15 feeler) exhaust (x1) 0.18 - 0.22.
clutch - i have been informed that some almost new bikes have clutches are noisy, mine included (until i put in in gear ) rattle disappears.
choke cable - a blast of lube down the cable never hurt anybody, its summer now so cant imagine you using it much.. but maybe pull/push every now & again to keep it slick. spray some down all your cables while at hand. throttle, clutch & brake
dirt - products like Gunk or Muck Off do the job, i'm like you... wd/petrol + elbow grease, on anything that doesn't have seals or rubber etc. Parafin to clean the chain, washed off quickly before applying chain oil.
a box of throw-away latex gloves!!
ENJOY THE SUMMER :toothy2:
 

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I forgot one important point: I went through a clutch cable in slightly longer than a year, it started to fray at the same spot at the previous cable: at the point where the inner cable exits the cable sleeve, below at the place where the cable is attached to the right engine crankcase.
With the cable in the "resting "position, all seemed to be well but when pulling the clutch lever in, I noticed the inner cable rubbed against the cable sleeve lip. The cure was gently twisting the cable sleeve holder at the right engine crankcase so as to make the inner cable not to rub anywhere against the cable sleeve when pulling the clutch lever in. A simple and effective action which hopefully will make the cable last longer.
 

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AfricAddict
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65 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Wow, perfectstranger, you should write a manual (If you haven't already :thumbup:)..

Foz, thank you too, my clutch goes silent as well when the 1st is engaged, but still it makes the engine sound very rough when starting in the morning. My 92 TA feels so smooth from the first tic...

Anyway, I'm off to the garage, I'll post a report later...

Thanx again guys! ;)
 

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Wow, perfectstranger, you should write a manual (If you haven't already :thumbup:)..

Foz, thank you too, my clutch goes silent as well when the 1st is engaged, but still it makes the engine sound very rough when starting in the morning. My 92 TA feels so smooth from the first tic...

Anyway, I'm off to the garage, I'll post a report later...

Thanx again guys! ;)
Nah this is due to my day job as a technical translator for the manufacturer.

Please do report. :)
 

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AfricAddict
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Discussion Starter #8
Ok I'm panicking a bit right now... :mad:

After changing the springs and while re-installing the front wheel, the top left tightening bolt of the axle snapped off. I'll get a picture later and post it. It broke without any warning before I applied any serious torque.

Has this happened to anyone else? What's the situation now? Is the bike ridable with the 3 bolts? I know of a metal craftsman who could open a threaded hole in place, do you think it will do the trick?

Any advice would be appreciated.
 

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I think you'lle be fine riding the bike to the craftsman for him to open a hole in there. He'll surely set you up with the right bolt to go in the hole too. Don't panic :thumbup:

Keep us posted please :)
 

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Hi, cold valve clearances are:



-Fuel tank removal
-Air filter box removal and inspection, specially the ressonator chambers and at the places where the carbs tubes enter the air filter box; you might need to apply selant here and also to the ressonator where the 2 hoses connect, the existing sealant might be dry and cracked
:)
Hi, since its being mentioned here, i would like to know if there's any effect that i should take note of if the sealant is indeed cracked at the above mentioned post. i've checked mine and found it cracked. will it cause any inconsistent idling? or even worst??? i was thinking of applying RTV sealant but not sure if that works but concern goes to the bike should i decide to overlook it.
 

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Hi, since its being mentioned here, i would like to know if there's any effect that i should take note of if the sealant is indeed cracked at the above mentioned post. i've checked mine and found it cracked. will it cause any inconsistent idling? or even worst??? i was thinking of applying RTV sealant but not sure if that works but concern goes to the bike should i decide to overlook it.

Well. I won't do any bad to seal the places where the original sealant is cracked. At the worst scenario, you might get an air leak into the air filter box, bypassing the air filter.
 

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AfricAddict
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Discussion Starter #14
Ok, first impressions, the bike now handles a lot better but I still feel it pulls to the right slightly, I thought it was suspension related (less oil or worst spring on one fork). The bridge (I don't know how it's called in English, I mean the metal connecting arch which sits above the wheel) is perfectly level so I don't think the bike has ever crashed heavily with the front, do you have any ideas of what to look into? I'm thinking tires, wheels, bearings for a start...

Generally, just like when I did the same with the TA, I believe the suspension is the best investment, I now have a taller bike, which handles and brakes a lot better (no more excessive diving when going hard on the brakes), and rides more comfortably, who could ask for more for 250 euros?

I still haven't fixed the axle locking nut, so it take it easy, I plan to go this week.

The motul 5100 seems to be better on a warm engine than the previous oil, it rattles less and the gearbox feels smoother.

It's also nice to know that I carry a lot less dust below the fairings, cleanliness is half of royalty we say here, and I agree!

Finally the brake fluids change and some adjustment on the lever have greatly improved the "bite" of the front brake...
 

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AfricAddict
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Discussion Starter #15
Ok, I found out that the axle locking nut thread is available as a part, all I have to do is remove the old one and screw a new one in!

Will post update as soon as I get this sorted. :thumbright:
 

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1. Apply some heat to release the thread locker, use a pipe wrench or something like that and unscrew. :thumb:

2. Find something that fits in the mixed nuts & bolts jar :thumb:

3. Apply thread lock and screw it in, cut of the head and be happy :D

 

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AfricAddict
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Discussion Starter #17
This could work. It's an M6 thread, and I do have such bolts in the jar...

A friend of mine has located the part for RD03 but no listing for RD07, it costs 1,5 euros so if I can find it I'll use that, otherwise I'll take your solution.

Did you use a torch to release the thread lock? I don't have one, what else could I use?
 

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Toolbox
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You will regret saving some change money by not getting the correct bolt but instead using "something similar" from the mixed nuts and bolts - jar. Your life (and possibly the life of others) depends on the stability of your front axle, which is clamped in by use of this bolt. Moreover, you will not want to test how such "other" material will react over time with the material of the fork; if you ever regret and want to remove the "similar" part again you may find that it has welded itself into place by corrosion.

You are more lucky than others, since the bolt has not broken off flat at the surface of the fork. Remove the old part, put in a new part, using the correct torque, re-install the front axle, using the correct torque for the nuts only, and ride on.
Cheers
Chris
 

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AfricAddict
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Discussion Starter #19
OK I got the original bolt and nut from the RD04 (no part listing for the RD07) and it fits perfectly.

I managed to remove the old one using 2 thinner M6 nuts with the outer barely half screwed. It worked like a charm, no heat was needed.

Test ride tomorrow!
 

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AfricAddict
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Discussion Starter #20
Guys, I looked around the forum and couldn't find the info, googled it but I want to make sure I have it right. Are these tire dimensions correct for an RD07?

Front 90/90-21 54S
Rear 140/80-R17 69H
Apologies if it has been reposted before.
 
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