Honda XRV Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I'm Miv
New to the group and just got a 1998 Xrv 750
Few upgrades here and there
After a headlight grill and some panniers but unsure what model it is rd07 etc etc
166632
166633
166634
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
You've got a beautiful bike here! In great shape it looks.

That is a RD07A.. the dual-vented headlight cowling identifies this is as one, as well as your YOM 1998. I shall now proceed to give my two-cents worth on what you already have sussed out, I am sure.

The forks have been changed; yours is an USD (up-side-down) pair, where as the original is not.

The front wheel has been changed too. The factory original sports dual disks with simple straight circumference drilled disks; yours is one wavy petal drilled unit. This is a heavy bike, and Honda put those twin disks and calipers to provide good stopping power for a 220kg+ machine. So ensure to put the bike through some hard stops and assess the braking distances.

I see what looks to be a longer side-stand; maybe the USD forks have given a lift to the overall height.. ? Cannot see much of the rear mono-shock. I wonder if it has been "lifted"?

The front mud-guard too has been raised, from a dynamic (moving with the wheel) to a static high mount. Tyres are good for tarmac and light off road.

Those Acerbis wrist guards are a nice touch. They provide great protection if you were to crash (God forbid!) and also protects your hands when riding in heavy brush.

The rear luggage rack has been replaced too, as has been the rider's foot pegs (wider units, better for active trail riding). The engine and fairing guards are good additions too, as you can easily damage the fairings if you drop the bike. The mirrors too have been replaced. These units are nice, as they will fold away from damage in the event of a drop / crash (where is the other one??). The front indicators have been replaced (originals are Imasen, square, gabled).

The stock handle bar has been replaced and you are on bar-risers too, I note. The handle-bar switches and the throttle unit on the handle bar looks different / replaced.

I see some odds and ends on the dash; a Garmin Zumo GPS unit will add serious assist to some long-distance cross-continent travel (IMHO..)

The seat looks to have been padded up and the exhaust muffler has been replaced with a more leaner unit, hopefully generating greater power. I assume the garbs too have been re-jetted.

Have a look-see at the front sprocket (stock is 16 teeth front and 45 teeth rear). The front sprocket, if poorly fitted or if the chain is worn out, can and will chew up the sprocket shaft / counter shaft (a common gripe on this machines) necessitating an expensive engine split, and counter shaft replacement (spares are fast becoming difficult to source). So heads-up on this area. Keep that chain on the correct tensioning, and keep it lubricated, particularly if you onto gravel and loose substrate.

A another common issue in these machines, easily corrected, are the electrical connections, particularly where the stator outputs connect to the Regulator / Rectifier harness, the starter solenoid connectors (melt downs due to poor connectivity, resulting in higher resistance, overheating and melting down..) etc. Prior to doing any far-off travelling check out and ensure solid electrical connectivity.

Overall you have got a bike in stunning cosmetic and aesthetic condition. If the motor and allied systems are in good order (I am SURE they are; Honda built these for cross-continent travel and have bomb-proof build quality!) you have a superb machine that will take you pretty much anywhere you wish to take it.

The only two SERIOUS gripes I personally have against these incredible machines are-
1) NO sixth gear..
2) Stock saddle is hard, and a pain-in-the-arse, literally! (check out AIR-HAWK seat gel packs; they offer some serious comfort!!)

Fair weather and tail winds I wish you and may she bring you years of joyous riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You've got a beautiful bike here! In great shape it looks.

That is a RD07A.. the dual-vented headlight cowling identifies this is as one, as well as your YOM 1998. I shall now proceed to give my two-cents worth on what you already have sussed out, I am sure.

The forks have been changed; yours is an USD (up-side-down) pair, where as the original is not.

The front wheel has been changed too. The factory original sports dual disks with simple straight circumference drilled disks; yours is one wavy petal drilled unit. This is a heavy bike, and Honda put those twin disks and calipers to provide good stopping power for a 220kg+ machine. So ensure to put the bike through some hard stops and assess the braking distances.

I see what looks to be a longer side-stand; maybe the USD forks have given a lift to the overall height.. ? Cannot see much of the rear mono-shock. I wonder if it has been "lifted"?

The front mud-guard too has been raised, from a dynamic (moving with the wheel) to a static high mount. Tyres are good for tarmac and light off road.

Those Acerbis wrist guards are a nice touch. They provide great protection if you were to crash (God forbid!) and also protects your hands when riding in heavy brush.

The rear luggage rack has been replaced too, as has been the rider's foot pegs (wider units, better for active trail riding). The engine and fairing guards are good additions too, as you can easily damage the fairings if you drop the bike. The mirrors too have been replaced. These units are nice, as they will fold away from damage in the event of a drop / crash (where is the other one??). The front indicators have been replaced (originals are Imasen, square, gabled).

The stock handle bar has been replaced and you are on bar-risers too, I note. The handle-bar switches and the throttle unit on the handle bar looks different / replaced.

I see some odds and ends on the dash; a Garmin Zumo GPS unit will add serious assist to some long-distance cross-continent travel (IMHO..)

The seat looks to have been padded up and the exhaust muffler has been replaced with a more leaner unit, hopefully generating greater power. I assume the garbs too have been re-jetted.

Have a look-see at the front sprocket (stock is 16 teeth front and 45 teeth rear). The front sprocket, if poorly fitted or if the chain is worn out, can and will chew up the sprocket shaft / counter shaft (a common gripe on this machines) necessitating an expensive engine split, and counter shaft replacement (spares are fast becoming difficult to source). So heads-up on this area. Keep that chain on the correct tensioning, and keep it lubricated, particularly if you onto gravel and loose substrate.

A another common issue in these machines, easily corrected, are the electrical connections, particularly where the stator outputs connect to the Regulator / Rectifier harness, the starter solenoid connectors (melt downs due to poor connectivity, resulting in higher resistance, overheating and melting down..) etc. Prior to doing any far-off travelling check out and ensure solid electrical connectivity.

Overall you have got a bike in stunning cosmetic and aesthetic condition. If the motor and allied systems are in good order (I am SURE they are; Honda built these for cross-continent travel and have bomb-proof build quality!) you have a superb machine that will take you pretty much anywhere you wish to take it.

The only two SERIOUS gripes I personally have against these incredible machines are-
1) NO sixth gear..
2) Stock saddle is hard, and a pain-in-the-arse, literally! (check out AIR-HAWK seat gel packs; they offer some serious comfort!!)

Fair weather and tail winds I wish you and may she bring you years of joyous riding.
Thanks for the advice the forks wheels yokes brakes and rear shock were taken off an aprilia svx i was told. All done proper byba professional. Not had the bike long but runs rides and stops like it should. The seat is a custom gel seat so comfy on the arse. Renthals and Oxford heated grips other than that good bike endcan needs a polish so does the rack and crash plate. The chain and sprockets are new but will keep an eye on em. Thanks for the advice
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top