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How much is the fish?
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Discussion Starter #1
Last weekend I went on the xtz750.com big trail bike meet, camping near Bala, North Wales. Access to the campsite was via a half mile long, wet, muddy & stoney dirt track. Slipping & sliding along this track every time I wanted to go into/out of the site (with the back wheel going in one direction, the front wheel going in another, and me sitting there screaming like a girl and hoping for the best), and after my recent offroad experience, I decided that I need some offroad tuition.

I’m sure there must be a few others like me; confident and experienced road riders but having no offroad experience at all, but who would like to learn.

So would anyone else be interested in some basic, absolute novice tuition, possibly in Wales and using your own bike (@, TA, etc.), as ultimately these are the bikes that you’d end up going green laning on?

I’d be looking at doing it towards the end of August / beginning of September if possible, as the we’d have more chance of better weather. Probably one day (Saturday), or maybe even two (Saturday/Sunday) depending upon costs. I’d be happy to do the organising, etc.

Anyone interested?
 

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Truffle shuffle king
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Yes please- I don't like screaming like a girl.... Get a lot of practice forward roles of the bike though
 

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Registered
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Sounds good ... to long since I did any off road stuff and it was always with a LOT lighter and smaller bike. Practice and advise on how to use my @ off road would be nice :clown:
 

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Hi! knobbley, last time I upset you a bit for which I apologise. However this may not be what you want to hear but here goes. My opinion is that 'adventure bikes' are for gravel type roads and not green laneing. In places like Andorra and Portugal etc gravel roads abound but a road bike is not quite suitable hence an 'adventure bike'. Our muddy slippy lanes are too much for a 200kg + lump, a light trail bike is far better. Don't wreck your good bike, get an XT/XL/KL lightweight. I realise that we do have the odd RUPP that is negotiable during the dryer weather but they are relatively few. Part of the worry about riding off road on your P&J is the fear of damaging it and damage it you will believe me. I did loads of long distance green riding on a DT175 Yam and it was ideal by its light weight and nimble manners. If you have got this far (reading) please take the advice and do the off road stuff on a second bike. Plastic and other vulnerable bits are expensive. Offered in good faith and with no offence intended.
 

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Well I accept that the Vara is far from ideal for off-road riding, but it does represent a challenge!!! If date and venue are okay I'd sign up to this.

twistgrip is right about mud; the Vara is b****y awful in even shallow mud, but moderate lanes are fun.
 

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Craigypops
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6,747 Posts
Twistgrip has it spot on for me, a 200kg+ bike (mine being about 210 unladen) is no good for green lanes but gravel tracks are fine... that being said i'd like to do a bit of `light` off-roading but on a proper bike, exc or xr etc...

I think J might disagree though seeing where he's been on his 1200GSa, but he's a nutta.

Good idea though m8 for anyone wanting to try it on a big adventure :thumbup:



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geriatric
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2,474 Posts
Hi! knobbley, last time I upset you a bit for which I apologise. However this may not be what you want to hear but here goes. My opinion is that 'adventure bikes' are for gravel type roads and not green laneing. In places like Andorra and Portugal etc gravel roads abound but a road bike is not quite suitable hence an 'adventure bike'. Our muddy slippy lanes are too much for a 200kg + lump, a light trail bike is far better. Don't wreck your good bike, get an XT/XL/KL lightweight. I realise that we do have the odd RUPP that is negotiable during the dryer weather but they are relatively few. Part of the worry about riding off road on your P&J is the fear of damaging it and damage it you will believe me. I did loads of long distance green riding on a DT175 Yam and it was ideal by its light weight and nimble manners. If you have got this far (reading) please take the advice and do the off road stuff on a second bike. Plastic and other vulnerable bits are expensive. Offered in good faith and with no offence intended.
I disagree.............profusely.

The bikes are only limited by the ability and experience of the rider. I have been green laning for a few years now. Admittedly we have sometimes bitten off more than we can chew but normally due to adverse weather conditions. BUT, I have ridden every kind of lane from gravel to light dusty tracks,to deep muddy ruts and water,to huge rocky escarpments that would give a billy goat a shiver. That is what makes it an adventure,to push yourself and your abilities and use the bike to it's max. Nothing is easy in this life. If people want easy all the time I suggest they by a playstation and stay indoors. The guys on the dakar ride bikes weighing in at 250-300 kilo's when fully fueled you don't see them complaining. I am no dakar rider but I have a bloody good laugh and so do a lot of other guys on here, If anyone gets the chance to learn the basics go for it, you'll uncover and tap into a whole new world when you realise just what you can do on a 185-200 kilo bike.
Search this forum for advice on how to do it, what to wear,how to prepare and what kit is prefferred,get the right tyres,the right route and the right mates to go with and you will have the time of your life. If a bit of experienced tuition is available and you have the time and the cash go for it. If you just want to tag along with people on here we will look after you too.
 

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geriatric
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2,474 Posts
What sort of tuition would you have in mind?

I'd fancy being involved in this.

what are you talking about you plank, now your out and about you should be taking people out and passing on that annoyingly obvious natural ability you have through example, talk about teaching grandmothers to suck eggs!
 

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Craigypops
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You have made some very good points there Rich, now i don't know what to beleive :confused:

It's like watching a documentary with brainy professors, one minute you think yeah he's right, spot on, then the next beard comes on and you think no wait, he's right now... oh dear...

Ive got tourances on atm, are they any good for green laning?



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Cant stop 'tinkering'
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Re some of the comments above - have to agree i think its more down to the riders ability and mental state :toothy10:

I was crap when i started doing green lanes (and still am to an extent).

Ive gradually improved just by getting on and riding the thing and having a go. Had numerous gentle offs - no big ones, as i try to ride within my own abbilities and the conditions.

If its dry smooth gravel/dirt track i will go fast as i feel fine on it, anything wet and slippy, I take it a fair bit easier. Anything technical i will go slow or turn around and go a different way rather than risk a big off.

Think its a great idea to get tips from others tho :thumbleft:

My biggest problem is still riding in mud - dont know if its just the setup of my bike or a mental thing, but i have teriible trouble in it - the bike just goes where it wants most of the time and really slows me down :toothy10:

Think you have to remember that the bigger bikes are gonna be nothing like pukka enduro lighter weight bikes - ive ridden with some offroad, and they are worlds apart in what they can really do with an average rider aboard.

Mudwiz - what do you need to learn :confused: :D:D:D
 

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geriatric
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Ive got tourances on atm, are they any good for green laning?
In the right weather on the right lanes perfectly alright, I would stay away from the wet stuff but at the height of summer when all is dry and firm you will have no problems. In fact I have been out with a certain learned gentleman from this here place who chooses to ride all lanes and all conditions on a pair of TKC's with absolutely no knobbles left on them,more or less bald, but his ability and absolute disregard for his own safety alow him to have as much fun as the rest of us.We have had plenty of guys come out on tourances,conti's,trailwings and worse-road tyres.
Tourances will get you through most dry dirt tracks,any gravel,stoney stuff and dry grass but will limit you in the muddy wet stuff and the green grass as they will slip a bit. BUT, if you take it easy,feel your way along you can get past any difficult stuff and back to the faster,drier stuff.
We forget sometimes that the speed limit is acknowledged to be safe at 20-25 mph on the lanes. You can do 30 legally and some bomb it along at far in excess of the legal limit but they do spoil it for others and create dangerous situations if a horse of someone on foot pops out from behind a bush. The safe way is the best way,it doesn't spoil the fun it just extends it and ensures it's continuation.
You are more than welcome to come out with me mate anytime you fancy a bimble,there are some great lanes near the national this year, we'll nurse the novices along, support the semi experienced and rely on the experienced for them passing on any tips and tricks as we go along.
 

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geriatric
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2,474 Posts
Just noticed, used my 2500 post for a rant,what a waste,off to take my anti grump pills.....................................possibly suppositorially!
 

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Craigypops
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it's about an hour......
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2,198 Posts
Hi! knobbley, last time I upset you a bit for which I apologise. However this may not be what you want to hear but here goes. My opinion is that 'adventure bikes' are for gravel type roads and not green laneing. In places like Andorra and Portugal etc gravel roads abound but a road bike is not quite suitable hence an 'adventure bike'. Our muddy slippy lanes are too much for a 200kg + lump, a light trail bike is far better. Don't wreck your good bike, get an XT/XL/KL lightweight. I realise that we do have the odd RUPP that is negotiable during the dryer weather but they are relatively few. Part of the worry about riding off road on your P&J is the fear of damaging it and damage it you will believe me. I did loads of long distance green riding on a DT175 Yam and it was ideal by its light weight and nimble manners. If you have got this far (reading) please take the advice and do the off road stuff on a second bike. Plastic and other vulnerable bits are expensive. Offered in good faith and with no offence intended.
Dont agree with this at all. I bought my @ to be used on and off road. I will take it anywhere. Or at least try to. Thats what its made to do. Hence the term 'dual sports'. If you are scared of breaking it then yes, stick to roads. But if like me you accept the risks then go off road. Its great fun.
 

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what are you talking about you plank, now your out and about you should be taking people out and passing on that annoyingly obvious natural ability you have through example, talk about teaching grandmothers to suck eggs!
I think he meant as tutor!

... Ive got tourances on atm, are they any good for green laning?
http://www.xrv.org.uk/forums/ride-r...our-wiltshire-byways-oct-07-a.html#post214372

I think J was using Tourances. Read down and you'll see I was using Pilot Roads!
 

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geriatric
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2,474 Posts
What sort of tuition would you have in mind?

I'd fancy being involved in this.
I think he meant as tutor!
I bloody hope so or we're in big trouble, if I and a few others ever need a refresher course and the oracle ain't about or has rusted up we're in deep ****e in the Alp section...........................................probably the twin section,the xr section................and so on and so on.
You never know he might bang his head one day and remember some old phone numbers or put in an appearance or two.;)
 

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How much is the fish?
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422 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
What sort of tuition would you have in mind?

I'd fancy being involved in this.
Very, very basic stuff concerning riding off-tarmac, hopefully on fairly easy tracks/trails, suitable for complete and utter beginners. I´ve no ambition to become another Ricky Carmichael, I´d just like to learn a few basic skills which may help to keep me upright when I go on trails, tracks, etc. So if you´ve done stuff before then it would be too basic for you - unless as suggested you fancy teaching us?
 

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Hi I have just read twistgrip’s post and although I would agree that if you ride a big bike off road you may damage it, I find my AT and now my KTM 950 Adventure very capable off road, the limiting factor is only down to the rider, I have seen a GS1150 on road tyres go up a muddy hill when 400cc trail bikes with MX tyres had given up (sadly not me) we take our big bikes everywhere normally with camping gear on them as well, we fill that’s the whole point of an Adventure bike, when you run out of road you can just keep going. The main rules we stick to and its worked so far is, never off road alone on a big bike, if it looks difficult get off and walk it first to pick your route, and help each other. I had a XR400 a while ago which I used for green laning I got fed up with having to trailer it to Wales or somewhere ride the lanes then had to trailer it home, now we can go much further into France and Spain and get much more out of our hobby.

Here is some of the stuff we have done.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9uqRdW06Dk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbY5DL0SnzY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr10dSPyLV4


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYH974S8jlI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MSxavtilSLc


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=teRNWJI5h-A
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBCGIT8vu_s
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XXA0tHIUZM
 
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