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it's about an hour......
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I am not mechanically minded at all (those at Piel can verify)...but am starting to learn (punctures and changing fuel pump so far). I decided today was the day my @ had an oil change (my first ever) - the beginning of a major service (by me) as I have no idea when the last one was done prior to me buying it (service book says 2001 at 5500 miles but no idea of previous owners service since this). My @ has now done 12,500 miles.

Heres some problems I found which may help other riders who have not experienced oil changes before.

1) I expected the draining of the oil to be gentle progressivly getting quicker as I loosened the draining plug. Wrong. No oil, then oil everywhere. I was so shocked as I was expecting a gentle flow until the plug was removed I knocked the drain tray over and got oil all over my drive.
2) The Haynes manual advises "warm up the engine so the oil will drain easily". I had just come back from the motorbike shop with my new oil and filters and started stripping the bike pretty much as soon as I got back. Warning (as per stated in the Haynes manual, the oil can cause severe burns). Well I got burnt (not severe luckily!!!). Not letting the engine cool enough before working on it, when the oil went everywhere it also went all over my hands. Be warned. Sounds like common sense to let it cool first but I just wasnt thinking. Be warned.
3) I bought a filter socket as stated in the Haynes manual. It is easy enough to get the filter socket over the old oil filter but there is no way to use a socket to unscrew it. The haynes manual says use a socket extension. With a centre stand fitted there is no room to get the socket to the filter. I ended up using a giant pair of pliers to unscrew the filter.

Hope this helps some other newbies to servicing.

Not sure whats next on the agenda. I think a trail ride this weekend before I attempt whatever the manual says next.
 

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Wing Commander
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I love reading this. Makes me feel much less of a numptie.;)
 

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Senior Member
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He -He - He :D

Oil needs to be hot, . . put your marigolds on. :rolleyes: :D :D

Good on ya for giving it a go. :thumbleft:

ps.

Don't suppose you got a video of it. :rolleyes: :D :D
 

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Premium Member
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..Not sure whats next on the agenda. I think a trail ride this weekend before I attempt whatever the manual says next.

Oooooohh I'd say try changing all the spark plugs or checking the valve clearances next! Guaranteed to turn you grey!!!



:toothy3:
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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This is how I do it.

1. Get the engine hot, I usually have everything ready for when I get in from work, oil tray with enough room for the oil (I can get a couple of oil changes in it before it needs emptying), plenty of rags and the right sized sockets/spanners.

2. Remove the bashplate and lob it outside so I don't accidentally lean in the thick gunge living inside it.

3. Remove and put safe somewhere the dipstick/filler cap so as to make the old oil flow out with more force.

4. Using a ring spanner, loosen the sump plug so that it can be undone using just fingers.

5. Place the catch tray far enough away to catch the initial spurt of oil, then undo the sump plug whilst pushing it at the same time so the oil doesn't come out till I want it to. This is of course rubbish, I always get some over my gloved hand.

6. Having done my best not to drop the hot sump plug in the oil, I move the catch tray as the flow of oil lessens.

7. I then get a pair of oil filter pliers and remove the filter after first pushing all the rubber vent pipes out of the way.

8. I go and have a cup of tea or my dinner and leave the oil to continue dripping.

9. Come back out to the garage, bend down with a full stomach, loosen belt on jeans. I clean up the sump plug, throw the old washer away and put a new one on from the draw of about 50 I buy at the local tool place for not very much money at all. Screw the sump plug back in by hand and tighten using the ring spanner without too many veins standing out in my forehead. This is the right amount of torque!

10. Put on clean gloves, get out a new filter and rub a little clean engine oil onto the sealing ring. Spin it onto its mounting bolt and do up using clean dry gloves or bare hands for best grip.

11. I pour out 0.6 litres of oil into my measuring jug, stick a funnel into the filler hole and pour the oil in. Then I twice fill the measuring jug up with a litre of oil and pour that in as well.

12. Pop the filler cap on, start the engine and make sure the oil light goes out. I run the engine at tickover for about a minute (Checking for leaks around the filter and sump plug) then stop the engine. I go and have another cup of tea after which I recheck the oil. Hot oil I expect it to be up to the topmost mark on the dip stick with the bike held vertically. Cold oil I would expect it to be about 3/4 of the way up the dipstick.

13. Put the bash plate back on, making sure the rubber vent pipes are back in place. Ride the bike a few times around my estate and double check for leaks.
 
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Great thread,
Beddowsm been there done that on my Bandit although im getting a bit better at doing stuff. Brake bleeding is an easy one with great results.
Bled my AT when i first got it and lumps of fluid had solidified and fired out under pressure! Had to suck the rest out with a syringe conected to the bleed pipe as it wouldnt pump out because of the air gaps. I wonder how long it had been inbetween changes for it to solidify?

Yen Powell,
Great breakdown of procedures, there should be more like that with pics to train us new mechanicals:thumbup:
 

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it's about an hour......
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Discussion Starter #7
Don't suppose you got a video of it.
No, thank god.....it would have to be sensored with the words that were coming out of my mouth!!!

I love reading this. Makes me feel much less of a numptie.
Ive been on your Zebra site today (after trying to watch the Piel Island) - amazing what you did to get the Zebra running....far from a numptie.

This is how I do it.
Thats Yen, glad you posted. I forgot to check the oil after running the engine (only did it when cold). And forgot to put the breathers back in their holders. Will make a note and do tomorrow.


Last point - pouring oil in with GIVI crash bars is not easy. The funnel just doesnt go in!!!!!!!! Resulting in more oil over my drive!!!!
 

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Hey beddo, fancy changing my output shaft for me? :D

lol. I remember the squeal I let out when I took the float bowl off my cb50j carb 25 years ago!
If I could go back and tell me to chill, its just a pile of nuts and bolts. And the big scary motor? well.. thats just a bigger pile of nuts and bolts!

Like everything else, stick yourself in at the deep end, and you'll be amazed how much and how fast you learn. :thumbup:
 

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Wing Commander
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This is how I do it.

3. Remove and put safe somewhere the dipstick/filler cap so as to make the old oil flow out with more force.
Pure genius. I am not worthy. Obviously I knew all the rest:D
 

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Tenacious Member
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3) I bought a filter socket as stated in the Haynes manual. It is easy enough to get the filter socket over the old oil filter but there is no way to use a socket to unscrew it. The haynes manual says use a socket extension. With a centre stand fitted there is no room to get the socket to the filter. I ended up using a giant pair of pliers to unscrew the filter.
Found the same procedure to be tricky, rather than impossible, on a 650 TA - with a centre stand. Had to put the filter adapter over the filter, put the socket on the filter, feed a long (8"-ish?) extension through from the rear of the bike, then connect the ratchet. It worked, although the alignment wasn't totally straight.

Initial reaction was more along the lines of "Bloody Haynes, they're bleedin useless!" :D Still, got there in the end.
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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Found the same procedure to be tricky, rather than impossible, on a 650 TA - with a centre stand. Had to put the filter adapter over the filter, put the socket on the filter, feed a long (8"-ish?) extension through from the rear of the bike, then connect the ratchet. It worked, although the alignment wasn't totally straight.

Initial reaction was more along the lines of "Bloody Haynes, they're bleedin useless!" :D Still, got there in the end.
These are the boys, I laugh at oil filter removal nowadays, don't even get my hands dirty, I reckon a toddler would have enough strength to remove the filter with these.
 

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Thank you VERY MUCH Generalissimo for the detailed description of the steps. It was SO helpful that my first oil change was incredibly seamless. Not a drop of oil on the ground.
This thread should be probably moved to the HOW TO... section.
Thanks again.

Giancarlo
 

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Not just me then:thumbright::D

However careful I am to gently ease out the drain plug, I always end up with oil up me arm and the drain plug in the bottom of the drip tray...:rolleyes:

I also had a battle to get the filter off. I'd just bought a filter wrench jobby for the Kangoo, and thought 'perfect, it'll do the bike too'....oh no it bloody won't:mad: Had to go and buy another different jobby..not easy in Turkey...160km round trip!!

Like the look of those filter pliers though...hmmm;)
 

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Not just me then:thumbright::D

However careful I am to gently ease out the drain plug, I always end up with oil up me arm and the drain plug in the bottom of the drip tray...:rolleyes:
Yes... every time... and every vehicle I've ever changed oil on! ;)
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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On the rare occasion I make no mess during the actual change, I accidentally kick the drainage container and slop some on to the floor.
 

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I always just stab through the old filter with an old screwdriver and get it moving with that. New one goes on hand-tight. :thumbup:
 
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