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Last of the Minoans
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I keep coming across references to oil specifically designed for singles and V twins. I've heard that it improves the gearbox. The stuff appears to be a 20w/40 - does anyone have any experiences or further information about this? Thanks to commuter mileage I have to change oil and filter at slightly over one month intervals, so I get the chance to try lots of different types......
 

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Last of the Minoans
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Me again. I decided to have a look on the web to see if there is anything about specific v-twin oils, and came across the Amsoil site: http://www.searchforparts.com/important_articles/motorcycle.html
They sell a 20w/50 synthetic apparently for v-twins, with the proviso that it's recommended for Harleys and European makes - Japanese machines being recommended to use 10w/40. Interesting.

They also have some interesting claims to make about using car oils. They say that the friction modifiers do not cause clutch slip. Rather, that the clutch slip is a result of varnish build up. I've used car oils a lot over the years, and I have to say that I've noticed a tendency for clutch slip to occur at those times. I don't know what to believe. One thing they say (quoted from a magazine) that I do agree with is that motorcyclists are paying far more than they should for so called 'motorcycle-specific oils'.

I do 3,500 miles a month and have to change oil and filter a lot, so oil costs are a major concern to me. I want to put the best oil in at oil change time, but I don't want to pay twice what I would have to pay for what ostensibly does the same job in a high-performance car. Any opinions out there?
 
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I once knew a guy with a dr800s big, by Suzuki (The biggest one cylinder engine ever, I had one then as well) and he put some very thick oil in it to reduce the oil consumption a bit. What I can recall was that the oil was meant for harley's, not sure but think it was 20W50...

Then again, he didn't use his bike very much, mere some offroading.


But hey, oil change is due every 8000 miles isn't it?

Isn't it possible to buy oil by large amounts? Should be somewhat cheaper I guess.

Just some ideas....

Tijn.
 

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Last of the Minoans
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the reply - I imagine such a thick oil would be good where clearances are large (like big singles, worn engines and, erm, brand new Harley Davidsons apparently.....). I take it you didn't try this yourself?

I thought about buying the oil in bulk, it certainly is cheaper, but the outlay is too high for me to manage in one month - I have to change expensive consumables like tyres very often too. Interestingly I do seem to be able to detect differences in different oils. One of the best I used was (I think it's called) Evotech(?); one of those doobries with charged particles (+ve or -ve? I don't know....). I tried using the ZX1 additive too. That seemed to make the gear change a little smoother. Generally I find that the gear change is easier just after an oil change, and that's at least consistent with the idea of a thicker oil helping the gear change action; the oil is likely to be slightly less viscous coming up to the service interval.

The 8,000 mile oil change intervals I've always thought were rather long for a bike. Many other bikes seem to have intervals around the 3,000 mile mark, and I would rather not risk wearing an engine out prematurely. I don't always believe what Mr Honda-san says. I did consider changing the oil at 4,000 with an oil and filter change every other oil change (i.e., the filter is changed every 8,000 miles), but these days I tend to use pattern filters (£2.00 cheaper than genuine), and I worry that these may not be as good. I rely on the bike a lot, and take as much care as I can manage and can afford. This doesn't usually extend to fully synthetic oils, though I wish I could afford them.........
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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"I do 3,500 miles a month and have to change oil and filter a lot, so oil costs are a major concern to me."

You tell'em Stiggy old bean. These Johnny come low mileagers with their once a year oil changes and tyres that go all cracked, before they're worn out. Don't know they're born, haven't got backsides like an old piece of leather. Ahh the joys of oil changes coming round so quickly that the local dealer thinks you're buying the stuff anonymously for a third world country. And lets not forget the looks of disgust from the dealer when we ask about part exchange, jumpers for goal posts, penny chews, The Clangers, blue passports etc. Anyway have to go, can't sit here typing, got oil to change.
 

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Premium Member
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ROFL :lol:
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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ROFL? Wasn't he the bloke that operated finger mouse?
 

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Last of the Minoans
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Aye, happen. And stale Hovis crumbs in the coolant are a great cure for cracked rads (and soften leathery old backsides when used as a scrub with used engine oil).

Here's something to cheer up all those high mile (as opposed to mile high) people out there: WINTER IS ON IT'S WAY.

Ha!! I'm feeling depressed already.

What is ROFL, by the way? And whatever did happen to Yofi (or whatever his name was) or, for that matter, Fingermouse? A victim of Rentakill perhaps? I shudder to think.

Stig
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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Winter can be quite good if viewed in the right light.

All the born agains/romper suiters are off the road and thus not in my way when filtering through the rush hour traffic. All the born agains/romper suiters are off the road and thus not in my way at the local bike shop parts counter(I have my own parking space). All the born agains/romper suiters are off the road and thus not in my way on the motorway. I get to wear protective clothing without losing 2 stone in sweat. My engine seems to run better in cooler conditions. All the born agains/romper suiters are off the road thus making my bike look less like it's been dragged out of the local bog in comparison.

I'm glad you asked what ROFL is cos I didn't want to feel stupid alone.

I hear that Yofi had to flee the country when what he was doing to that poor mouse became illegal under the wildlife and countryside act 1984.
 

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Last of the Minoans
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
No, there must at least be two of us who don't know what ROFL is. It's bound to be something very important, and if we only knew what it was our lives would doubtless get better straight away.....

I agree whole hartedly with you about the boys with the toys. The down side is that come the first warm day of spring they will be out again, worse riders than ever thanks to having spent winter driving their expensive cars. How much do you recon those funky romper suits cost? Maybe they should have spent the money on something more useful (and less garish). But, you have to match your bike, don't you? And if my bike looks like it too was dragged out of a bog (albeit an oily one. Maybe a tar pit....?), then I feel honour-bound to comply!

Who needs to be able to do 160 mph, anyway?

Stig
 
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Totally agree about winter. With kit that'll keep me warm/dry I prefer it to summer. It's generally easier to keep warm than cool I find.

I think ROFL means Rolls On Floor Laughing.
 

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Last of the Minoans
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ah, that makes sense - I certainly did when I read it! Stig.
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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I like winter cos I get to wear my leccy vest. I can ride along in "smug mode" past all the michelin men shaped winter bikers, wearing nothing but an old grubby string vest underneath my cruddy jacket. Of course sometimes the wiring breaks unbeknown to me and I arrive at work with pneumonia. Best thing I ever bought for all year biking, even switched off it's still warm and it's lasted 7 years so it's well made.

I am, however, on the second pair of gloves as the old ones stopped working after about 3 years. I only wear the gloves very occasionally as I can't stand bulky hands and prefer motocross gloves and cold fingers for about 11 months of the year.

Luckily for my wallet, I don't ever seem to get cold legs or feet.
 

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Registered
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ROLF - Roll on the Floor Laughing
ROLFMAO - Roll on the Floor Laughing my Ass off
ROLFMBO - as above, but will bollox!
 

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Last of the Minoans
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well, I'm one of those Michelin men you see.....

I'd like to get electric gear but I've been put off by the price and suspicions about longevity (the kit; I know I'm not long for this world). How much did yours cost, and what make are they? Maybe I too could one day be a SHMWB (Smug High Mile Winter Biker). I don't think the acronym will ever catch on. Hmm; maybe with the Japanese bike manufacturers........

Stig
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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Just had to go and have a look to see. The vest is a Widder. I can't remember how much it cost any more. I wear it a lot without actually bothering to plug it in as it's a non bulky (very thin) layer and keeps the old chesticles warm. It packs very small so it's easy to take with me in the summer, so I can wear it over a t-shirt if I'm returning up the motorway late at night.

The gloves work well but are not waterproof. I've had them wet and switched on and they still keep the fingers warm. Last Christmas I wore them for 300 miles in the pouring rain with handlebar mitts and they were perfect. Problem is I can't stand bar mitts on a regular basis.
 

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Last of the Minoans
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I feel the same about bar muffs, but for through winter biking they certainly have their appeal. As soon as spring comes, of they come!

Widder. I'll have a look for the company and see who sells them. It sounds like a damned good idea. Last winter I used a charcoal handwarmer placed under my jacket at chest height - it worked but I ended up smelling like a bonfire for the rest of the day.......

The gloves still sound like a better idea than heated grips - they cook you on the inside while ice forms on the outside!

Stig
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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With regard to the vest, I've got the one with no collar. I borrowed a friends originally because I didn't want to pay lots of money and needed convincing. One trip had me reaching for the plastic. Anyway, my mates had a collar and I swear that everytime I stopped at traffic lights, it would steam up my visor, even when it was raised. Trust me you don't need collar or sleeves.

They say that the vest should be a very snug fit over a t-shirt, so it might be best to get it over the counter rather than mail order. Having said that I got mine mail order after describing my self over the phone as a skinny bastard.
 

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Last of the Minoans
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the advice. I can imagine the collar might act as some kind of conduit directing steamy body vapour upwards. In my case that would melt the visor rather than just steam it up.

Now I look at what I've just written I realise it could be taken the wrong way!

Have a good weekend, or if you don't, think of all that lovely winter weather that's on its way in a few months. That should cheer you up!

I'm off.....
 
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I bought a Chilli vest at the motorcycle show last year (£120ish). Wouldn't be without it now. Even in the "summer" on the National Rally it made a helluva difference during the night.
 
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