Honda XRV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I would like to hear from members who have had practical experience at mending punctures on the road.

How easy is it to brake the seal of the tyre from the rim. Can you do it with a boot, or do you need a ‘breaker’? What size tyre leavers do you recommend? What rim lubrication do you use? How easy is it to get the tyre central on the rim? Is it possible to repair a front tyre puncture without removing the wheel?

And any other useful tips you may have.

p.s. I have a Transalp
 

·
Ride any Road. Ask me...
Joined
·
2,574 Posts
I did 2 front wheel punctures on Saturday at the national. Both were pretty straightforward, no issues with breaking beads, etc, only slight problem was seating the tyre on reinflation. We just rode them, and a check a couple of miles later they were seated.
As far as lube goes, I carry WD40, so a squirt of that if required.

It always helps though to have done it a few times in the garage, before you need to do it for real, best way is to start fitting your own tyres, after having seen someone do it!

Good luck.........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I did 2 front wheel punctures on Saturday at the national. Both were pretty straightforward, no issues with breaking beads, etc, .........
That is encouraging:) Was you able to locate the puncture and repair the tube without taking off the front wheel? How did you brake the beads and what size tyre irons do you use?

Thanks
 

·
Ride any Road. Ask me...
Joined
·
2,574 Posts
Breaking the beads was with a heel! TKC80 and Metz 6days, both were warm from riding though! If push comes to shove, pop the bead under the sidestand and lean on it, if that doesn't work put the wheel back in the bike and use the brakes/engine to start it moving (loosen the rim lock if you use one).

I habitually take the wheel out, can be a bit tricky in the wilds with no centerstand, just be willing to balance the bike on the forklegs.

Finding the holes was also easy, 2 compression punctures, comes from running too low pressure on rough big rocks too fast! I use slime so find where the green stuff spills from, otherwise pump air in and feel/listen. Even easier if there is a stream near by.

I carry a spare 21" tube, will do back too, as a get you home, and a puncture repair kit. (And lots of other stuff too, but thats another story)

Tyre levers are the posh ones from racespec, Buggnati ?? about 8" long, and I need 3 for and easy repair.


If you check some of the national meet photos it shows it in action. Will try to find the link!

Have a go, you know you want to!!:p
 

·
The Angry Pasty Muncher
Joined
·
6,170 Posts
I would like to hear from members who have had practical experience at mending punctures on the road.

i had a puncture on the front wheel of my varadero once, i fitted a power socket and now when doing long distance i carry a 12v compressor. it's enough to get some wind in the tyre and get you to a tyre centre or dealer
 

·
"call me lucky"
Joined
·
728 Posts
I did 2 front wheel punctures on Saturday at the national. Both were pretty straightforward, no issues with breaking beads, etc, only slight problem was seating the tyre on reinflation. We just rode them, and a check a couple of miles later they were seated.
As far as lube goes, I carry WD40, so a squirt of that if required.

It always helps though to have done it a few times in the garage, before you need to do it for real, best way is to start fitting your own tyres, after having seen someone do it!

Good luck.........
no wonder you had problems reseating your tyre. i saw the state of your rim:D :D :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Mudwiz - Have a go, you know you want to!!
It is the very opposite - I don’t want to have a go! - It is 50 years since I used to mend punctures at the side of the road and even 20 years ago I rode my XT600 down to the Picos Mountains a couple of times and did not worry about getting punctures and never got any, but tempus fugit,:( which brings us on to:

Jasonbc - i had a puncture on the front wheel of my varadero once
In recent years my touring bikes have all had tubeless tyres and have been able to quickly and easily plug the tyres. I too carry a small electric compressor and have needed it - on one day whilst touring in Turkey, I had three punctures in the rear tyre of my Varadero - tyres running at normal pressure - all successfully plugged. When I got home I fitted Ultraseal. In the subsequent 5 years of ownership I got two more punctures that was dealt with by the Ultraseal.:)

I have now moved onto a Transalp - the Varadero got too big for me - it is a great bike, much nicer than the Varadero for running about in the UK - where I can rely on the AA to sort things out for me - but for continental touring, with those wire wheels! I suspect that I am past it.:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
I've done it and I carry a repair kit although I've lost my tyre levers which were flat melco about 20 cm long, I've still got my home levers ( one dunlop and two round melco which are better than the flat type but more awkard to fit on the bike. I've never had a problem breaking the bead, I now use tyre soap and I'd always take the wheel off.
I've never found it easy and I dread getting a puncture but it's been years since I have and I did that one at home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
you can do the front wihout taking the wheel off if you can patch the hole but if its to big to patch you have to take the wheel off to replace the tube anyway and to be frank doing with the wheel still on a pain in the ass and it only takes 5 mins to take the wheel off anyway. I can replace a font tube these days in 20 mins from wheels stopped rolling to going again, rear takes bit longer. practice is the key, 3 levers defineately make it easier. i tend to not bother patching the tube by the side of the road, I just replace the tube , and if im on a trip I'll patch the tube that night wherever Im staying ready for the next days rding




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
I stash a 21" tube under the seat along with a small compressor and clip the flat tyre levers to the underside of the seat, works a treat. As Mudwiz says, the 21" tube will get you home in the back wheel. The spare tube also saves you having to muck about with patches and glue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Although it is easier to plug a tubeless tyre than replace a tube, the plug is only a temporary and speed-limited repair, whereas a new tube is a permanent repair provided the tyre carcass remains sound.
You can almost always break the bead of a tube-type tyre with the heel of your boot.
Put a small lump of soap and some water in an old film canister for tyre lube. I carry a 17" rear tube and puncture repair kit, the thinking is that you are more likely to get a puncture in the back tyre on the road, and there is no point in having to go back in to fit the right size tube later. Three CO2 bulbs will get the tyre hard enough to seat. There are small hand-pumps available for bicycles that will inflate a m/cycle tyre with patience. Two levers will get the tyre on and off if you are practised. It is worth getting in some practice at home if you are new to the job.
 

·
They say I talk too much.
Joined
·
334 Posts
How easy is it to brake the seal of the tyre from the rim. Can you do it with a boot, or do you need a ‘breaker’? What size tyre leavers do you recommend? What rim lubrication do you use? How easy is it to get the tyre central on the rim? Is it possible to repair a front tyre puncture without removing the wheel?
I've never had trouble getting the tyre off of the rim by stepping on it. I have tyre levers that are about as long as my foot (and I have small feet ;-) )
For rim lubrication, a bit of soap works fine.
I never worry too much about getting the tyre central on the rim, it'll settle in while riding. Or so I tell myself.
I have never tried to repair a front tyre with the wheel still in, it seems like more trouble than it actually saves.

On bikes with no center stand, it's practical to carry a wood or metal bar with a fork-like shape on one side, to put under the foot peg or the swingarm to prop up the bike on the side stand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Has anybody used those aerosol inflaters that also have a sealant in that you can purchase at halfords, or is pre use of ultraseal any good. do not have a centre stand any tips for this
 

·
They say I talk too much.
Joined
·
334 Posts
Has anybody used those aerosol inflaters that also have a sealant in that you can purchase at halfords
Those may get you home where you can change the tube. They sometimes get messy, though.
And if the hole is large they WILL get messy and WON'T get you home. But I've seen them work for small punctures.

do not have a centre stand any tips for this
Like I just said: On bikes with no center stand, it's practical to carry a wood or metal bar with a fork-like shape on one side, to put under the foot peg or the swingarm to prop up the bike on the side stand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Although it is easier to plug a tubeless tyre than replace a tube, the plug is only a temporary and speed-limited repair,
That is not true! A plug in the tread area of the tyre is permanent and usable as normal, so for that matter is an Ultraseal repair.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
Is Ultraseal an option?

Bung that in, and you may not need any roadside repairs...?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
That is not true! A plug in the tread area of the tyre is permanent and usable as normal, so for that matter is an Ultraseal repair.
I was talking about those emergency plugs you insert from the outside of the tyre. The 'figure of eight' type favoured by BMW are temporary and have a maximum speed and distance limit. If there is a variety of emergency plug that makes a permanent repair I haven't seen it. What sort do you use, LazyRider? Of course, if you get the tyre plugged from the inside, assuming the condition of the tyre allows it, the repair is permanent. However, this requires that the tyre and wheel be taken to a tyre specialist.

On balance, I'd say that tubed tyres are at a minor disadvantage when it comes to puncture repair on the road, since a tubeless tyre will often stay inflated when punctured by a nail or similar and it can be plugged for a quick repair. However, a new inner tube makes a complete repair and can be done on the spot by the rider.

Can't say I have ever used Ultraseal.
 

·
They say I talk too much.
Joined
·
334 Posts
On balance, I'd say that tubed tyres are at a minor disadvantage when it comes to puncture repair on the road, since a tubeless tyre will often stay inflated when punctured by a nail or similar and it can be plugged for a quick repair. However, a new inner tube makes a complete repair and can be done on the spot by the rider.
It depends.
In remote areas, tubed tyres are at a great advantage, because you can't always count on finding a new tyre that fits, but the chance of finding the right tube is much bigger. And a spare tube is easier to carry than a spare tyre ;)

In Africa you will often (in the cities) find people who repair tubes by taking the patches off and re-vulcanizing the damaged spots!

Plus, a tube can be inflated with a bicycle pump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I was talking about those emergency plugs you insert from the outside of the tyre.
So am I. I have used the mushroom plugs a number of times as a permament repair. That was 3/4 years ago before I discovered Ultraseal.

Can't say I have ever used Ultraseal.
I have had one pucture whilst using Ultraseal and all I suffered was a drop in tyre pressure of some 5lbs. Inflated the tyre and ran as normal until it was worn out. No problems.:D

It is the lack of worry about punctures with tubeless tyres that gives me concern at the thought of touring on a bike with tubed tyres.

Krtek :In remote areas, tubed tyres are at a great advantage
I do not go off road or to remote places, unless you count the unmade mountain roads of Eastern Turkey as remote. It was three punctures in one day, on those roads that convinced me that tubeless tyres and plugs is the way to go - the tyre got me back to the UK. With Ultraseal, I would have been even more pleased.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
So am I. I have used the mushroom plugs a number of times as a permament repair. That was 3/4 years ago before I discovered Ultraseal.
Fair enough. I have to say that whenever I have used one of these plugs the repair has always looked capable of doing a permanent job, especially after a few days in place. I just preferred to get an internal plug fitted asap.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top