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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, I've just fitted new rear pads and typical of me, I take every opportunity to lube and clean all pivots etc.
So, any of you out there who follows the Haynes manual for changing pads, wait a minute and do a bit more than they suggest.
They say about pivoting up the caliper so that you can change the pads. But, if you don't remove the front caliper bolt, from the rear caliper:rolleyes: it will be a reeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeal pain at a later date.
(Oh, just a point, you don't need to remove this to change the pads, I just suggest that you do.)
I got the bike with 6,000 miles on it and am just approaching 20,000; first time changing rear pads on the Transalp.
As, I wanted to clean around the piston, this meant undoing the caliper totally. I would suggest you do the same each time you change your pads; no I demand it in case I end up with your bike:D
That front bolt was a b*gger to get out. Whilst obviously trying to use just an Allen and then with extension bar, I resorted to WD40, 'taps' with a drift and a Impact Hammer.
This obviously helped, because an Allen key with an extension bar on the end, eventually moved it.
So, when you next change the pads, don't just change them, take the opportunity to clean the piston, re-grease the caliper pivots and copper grease the pivot threads.
 

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I'd also add not to do up the pin behind the little plug too tight, as well as the plug itself. I put copper grease on the pin and plug. When taking them apart to clean after winter they were both a bit reluctant to come out even though they were greased.
 

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Sage advice indeed.. I must admit when I'm pottering in the garage I tend to remove and refit all sort of things from the bike with a touch of coppaslip just to keep things free. It pays back in dividends come maintenance time especially if you are in a rush.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yup, been there done that:rolleyes:
I didn't mention the drift used on that bolt and cap.
I was just adding an extra section to changing pads.
But yes, I degreased the retaining bolt, ACFd the middle bit and copper greased the threads.
I don't think the front bolt had ever been out, as the amount of white powder (reaction) that came out.
 

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Confused from Morayshire here . . . . . . .

There is only one bolt on the rear caliper on a Transalp, the rear one. The front is a pivot pin that doesn't need to be removed, as it slides out of the rubber sleeve on the caliper carrier, which is where all the grease goes! Once rear bolt removed, caliper pivots up and forward, pads clear the disc and you then just slide the caliper away from carrier.

So why removed the caliper pivot pin?

Please explain if I've got the wrong end of the stick (won't be the first or last time ;):rolleyes: )

Steve T

:cool:
 

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Confused from Morayshire here . . . . . . .

There is only one bolt on the rear caliper on a Transalp, the rear one. The front is a pivot pin that doesn't need to be removed, as it slides out of the rubber sleeve on the caliper carrier, which is where all the grease goes! Once rear bolt removed, caliper pivots up and forward, pads clear the disc and you then just slide the caliper away from carrier.

So why removed the caliper pivot pin?

Please explain if I've got the wrong end of the stick (won't be the first or last time ;):rolleyes: )

Steve T

:cool:
If the pistons need an overhaul and the seals replaced then removing the caliper from the mounts is advised for easy access.By ensuring the parts come off and are easy to clean and replace saves time when the big jobs need doing.
 

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Hi John..

being as its a Transalp..I always strip the brakes down thats everything inc the sliders and pins ..even the little plates ..good old clean and copperslip and silicone grease.

Even pump the piston out a little to clean the road crud off saves money and time and frustration later on..these brakes seize up very easily if not maintained..takes about 20mnins per caliper..do mine twice a year spring/Autumn.

Find some 800 grit paper on the slide pins works a treat..:lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes Tramp, hopefully our answers will help Steve-T. The importance of taking the opportunity of removing the caliper totally. Imagine how many miles you could cover before the caliper had to come off! Mmmm, that bolt would be fun then:rolleyes:
Like you, I did do my piston. I pumped it out further than the general wear area and cleaned it with a toothbrush and a mixture of virtually all water and a tad of wash. I didn't want to degrease it too much.
WARNING - to be people new to brakes. Be careful when you pump the piston out further than its normal travel, it can pop out, which will end up with brake fluid everywhere.
 

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Confused from Morayshire here . . . . . . .

There is only one bolt on the rear caliper on a Transalp, the rear one. The front is a pivot pin that doesn't need to be removed, as it slides out of the rubber sleeve on the caliper carrier, which is where all the grease goes! Once rear bolt removed, caliper pivots up and forward, pads clear the disc and you then just slide the caliper away from carrier.

So why removed the caliper pivot pin?

Please explain if I've got the wrong end of the stick (won't be the first or last time ;):rolleyes: )

Steve T

:cool:

I agree with SteveT



@ Windmill John , I am sure that SteveT does not need help understanding ..

Steve showed me how to do it on my TA 650

First removed pad slider pin cover
Remove pad Pin
Remove rear bolt
Tilt the caliper forward on forward slider (one one you are removing) and the caliper will slide off complete with boot
Effectively splitting the caliper , just like you are doing except removing the slider bolt
You can do the cleaning pins , sliders , pistons etc ..


Yes you are saying that you are removing the sliding pin , so you can inspect the slider pin threads etc .. fair enough
but as you should be servicing the brakes very often then this is really the easiest method as SteveT suggests.

But since you say this is the first time you have changed a TA brake pads , fair enough but that the comments regarding *Helping* stevet *understand* , is uncalled for .. He is only trying to pass on his knowledge to help the job go smoother.

I for one bow to SteveT's knowledge , it has helped me .. Understand my Transalp inside out.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Apologies to Steve-T, no insult was intended and I was only pointing out the difficulties removing that bolt if left longer.
It's a bit like having a new tyre fitted, I take the wheel in and when I get it back, it gives me a chance to clean up the hub, regrease etc.
I was just talking about preventative care and no upset intended.
Sorry Steve if I've offended.
 

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Just to chuck in my 2 pennith worth! I have done my rear brakes twice now. 2nd time just now. The 1st time I followed Mr Haynes and the 2nd time (being a little more experienced with brakes having done the front ones for MOT) I followed Mr Johns advice. I found that to take the calliper all the way off was MUCH easier to clean everything. The whole job took less than an hour. The 1st time took much longer, with much f ing and geoffing and wasn't as good a job. In short, IMO to take the caliper off is quicker and you get a better job done. :thumbright:
 

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Be very careful when stripping and refitting calipers (or any other bolts on the bike) as some of the bolts are fitted dry If you copperslip lube everything then you could have bolts come loose due the expansion and contraction with heat and viabration. Not done brakes on my Transalp yet but on my previous bike the caliper bolts were loctited an had to be torqued correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Dificult one that. You're right if following the rules and what I do is probably a bit wrong, but I prefer to copper grease these bolts. Each time I wash the bike, I'll notice if anything has come loose. Maybe my way is personal and I shouldn't suggest others do it, but I do monitor the situation.
When I bought a ZZR once, when washing it for the fisrt time, there are meant to be two bolts holding the left exhaust on. There was only one and that one was just hanging on!
A classic example why hand washing gets you close to the bike and you discover things.
 

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I've had my alp 20 months and 14000 miles now. Never had any bolts come loose. I've had plenty of the little buggers sieze on though.
 
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