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geriatric
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just a quickie, can anyone tell me do the tight coils go at the top or the bottom when you fit progressive springs,the instructions were missing from the set I recently bought and any text is in bosch.
Also can you just undo the top nut and remove the standard springs and replace with the new progressive ones while the forks are still in the bike,do you have to replace the oil or can that wait for when I've got more time?
Also does anyone still hear from wheeliebin at all?
 

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geriatric
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Discussion Starter #2
no one know? come on it's been ten minutes already.........................
 

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2 bikes = twice as happy
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What Luton says. Also pretty sure oil level is measured with the springs in.

These would be those springs that were on eBay, right? I would intersted to know if they make real difference.
 

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I believe the open coils should go near the bottom in order to reduce the effective unsprung weight.
 

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From memory the tighter coils go at the bottom, So as the weight transfers on to the springs they get stiffer the more load is put on them :thumbup:
 

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geriatric
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Discussion Starter #8

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Premium Member
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And do them one at a time if the weight of the bike in on the front wheel :)
 

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And do them one at a time if the weight of the bike is on the front wheel :)
Been there :oops:
It's surprising how far the second fork cap can fly when it lets go of that final thread :D

I've never fitted any progressive springs but pretty sure that the tight coil should be at the bottom, fork oil should be measured with the spring removed & fork compressed.

If you haven't changed the fork oil, do it - you'll be horrified at the old stuff.....
But for a quick spring change they can be done with the forks still in the bike.

Phil
 

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Find a photo of a dirt bike from the late 70s or early 80s with progressive springs on the rear. I think you'l find that the open coils are at the bottom. The tight coils will close up first regardless of whether they are at the top or bottom... that's how they work.
 

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geriatric
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Discussion Starter #12
Been there :oops:
It's surprising how far the second fork cap can fly when it lets go of that final thread :D



If you haven't changed the fork oil, do it - you'll be horrified at the old stuff.....
But for a quick spring change they can be done with the forks still in the bike.

Phil
Phil,it's the quick change I'm doing. I have done springs on cars and bikes loads but never fitted progressive before so I needed a definite on the close and spaced coils (I think I have sorted that bit now).
I was wondering if anyone would come up with a reason to definitely not do just a spring change as I want to put the springs in,run the bike to the ace and back to see what the ride quality is like on standard oil. Unlike some bikes that you can stiffen up a bit by adding some air to make a bit stiffer the only way to make the damping harder or softer on the alp is to go for standard oil or go up to 10w oil to make it a bit stiffer or even 15w if the springs are particularily bouncy.
I know how to change the oil, done that a few times and yes it is disgusting what comes out. But rather than change for fresh oil and find the springs need 10w or higher and waste the money (why is it it is never 900cc or 1000cc it's always 1100 or 1200 and you have to buy two bottles,and have a 3/4 bottle sitting around being useless??!!) so I thought I'd just get some opinions just in case I was missing something.
The only problem I have now is no time to ride the bike to warm the fork oil up so it will run off the old springs easily so I'm going to have to suspend the springs above the fork and let the oil drip off over night and hope I end up with the same amount left in each fork in the morning.
Also toying with the idea of some shimming at the top of the spring to maybe lift it a bit,only a few mm but maybe act as pre-load and lose some of the front sag under the bikes own weight.
Anyone hear or speak to whealiebin at all, if they do can they ask him to pm me as he had a solution once and I wonder what he did with the bits he had.
 

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geriatric
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Discussion Starter #13
oh and just in case anyone else is thinking of the same job, I trawled the internet and one of the first googlable answers was from this very site so it just shows if you need to know it will be on this forum, someone on here has always done it before you just have to take the time to find it.......

http://www.xrv.org.uk/forums/bike-tech/44365-progressive-springs-2.html#post444396

I spent a few hours today fitting new springs to the front forks of my '02 RD07a, so thought I'd post a how-to as it turned out to be easier than I initially thought. I've been wanting to stiffen up the front end of my Africa Twin for quite a while, and bottoming out over the yumps during last year's Cambrian rally finally pushed me to get my wallet out. :mad:

I phoned Full Travel Suspension (www.wpsuspension.co.uk) and ordered a set of ProLine springs by WP. They cost £85 (inc. delivery) and arrived 10 days late on a 4 week lead time, so I wouldn't automatically recommend the outfit to others. :( My local bike shop supplied 2 litres of Silkolene SAE 10W fork oil for £16, and I got a plastic 1 litre measuring jug for 40p from Sainsburys.

The whole process took me a couple of hours, because I'm not very speedy with a ratchet. I haven't been out for the test ride yet, but weather permitting I hope to get out tomorrow. I'm hoping for a generally firmer feel, and less dive during braking. On the plus side WP supply 2 sets of different sized spacers with the springs, so I can quite easily (i.e. without taking the forks off) increase the preload should I want. The Haynes manual states that 5W oil is the standard, so I went for 10W oil as I want a firmer ride. I guess I'll find out how that worked out tomorrow! ;)

Right off to the garage with a cuppa and the rugby on the radio. The basic process is very straightforward;

* take the front wheel off
* remove one fork leg at a time
* remove the existing springs (one small and one large on later bikes)
* drain the old oil out
* pour the new oil in
* insert the new spring
* reinstall the fork leg in the bike
* repeat for the other fork
* then put the front wheel back on

However there are a few things to note:

* a centre stand really helps this process
* stop the bike toppling forwards with a car jack under the engine guard
* you don't need to remove the upper fairing panels
* crack off the top fork nut while the forks are still in the clamps
* don't worry about the top fork nut popping off like a champagne cork, it's not under a lot of tension
* while draining the old oil, pump the fork leg to make sure all the old oil comes out
* after refilling (620ml per leg for my bike) pump the fork leg and measure the level (110mm for my bike) with the leg fully compressed
* the ProLine springs replace both the standard short and long springs
* the ProLine springs should have the tightly wound section at the top of the fork leg
* remember to retorque the top fork nut after you've tightened the clamp nuts
* after the front wheel is back in pump the front brake a few times!

:thumbright:
 

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geriatric
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2,474 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
cheers mate, confirms what I thought.
Right off to the shed, thanks everyone that replied.
 

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yet another Dave
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2,854 Posts
from an engineering point of view it wont make any difference to the spring rate if you put them in different ways round, tight coils at the bottom or top or whatever. they are still being compressed along the whole length so it wont make any difference, its just the "done" way. if you think the weight saving is going to matter between one end of the spring to the other, and your going to notice any difference in the suspension, then carry on. youre talking grammes.

how many times can different appear in a paragraph?

unsure about the exact nature of the forks, but in general as long as their not kinky air cartridge forks from a decent sports bike then you hoik the front wheel in the air to unload the forks (bike on centre stand, toolbox or anvil in topbox), undo the caps (without going in the garage and looking, you might have to take the handlebars off) and pull the springs out. with the forks unloaded there should be very little spring pressure on the caps, if any. then put the new springs in and top up or renew the oil
 

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hoik the front wheel in the air to unload the forks (bike on centre stand, toolbox or anvil in topbox), undo the caps
...not forgetting to loosen the top yoke pinch bolts first. If you don't do that, the caps can be very difficult to remove and you can easily round off the hex on the cap or strip the thread on the soft alloy cap.
 

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Cant stop 'tinkering'
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little bit off topic - does anyone know why old fork oil stinks so bad :pukeleft:
 

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...not forgetting to loosen the top yoke pinch bolts first. If you don't do that, the caps can be very difficult to remove and you can easily round off the hex on the cap or strip the thread on the soft alloy cap.
As a pure nice to know and learn something new everyday..... Why is this???
 
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