Honda XRV Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all, I removed the front sprocket as i've heard horror stories of stripped splines on the output shaft and even some being welded on !!.

My splines look good but when i look at my sprocket all the teeth dont look that worn but looked slightly kinked over (see pic), also on one side there is some strange wear marks following the link pattern, Is this normal or is it time to replace that as well.

Could it be that the sprocket was on the wrong way round, it was fitted with the thick flange to the front with jtf296-16 showing, the wear is on the back face of the sprocket which would seem to indicate it was on the wrong way round and if the flange was nearest to the engine it would bring it away from the engine. Its as if the chain was not running in a straight line and rubbing on the rear face because the sprocket was too close to the engine and out of line.

The chain itself has a few seized links ( chain not straightening properly) but i was going to try and free this off with penetrating fluid a vice and some elbow grease. Tell me your thoughts please.

Thanks



 

·
I need a hug!
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
Hi Holla.

Just checked in the manual and the side of the sprocket with the markings on goes to the outside (faceing you), For my money, if you intend to keep the bike you should change the chain and sprockets now. If the chain is siezed on some of the links it will have dammaged the sprockets and even if you manage to free them off, the chain is likely to be stretched or twisted anyway.

P.S your sprocket looks like an aftermarket one in the photo as the original Honda ones have a rubber chain guide on each side.

Rog.:thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks i think, Bigrog. Who would you suggest for a chain and sprocket set then, a main dealer?. Ive heard people mention Lings, Ive never used them before - are they any good, do they offer a discount?, i'm a member of the yamaha forum and theres a member on there who'll give you 10% discount and cheaper postage, as i'm new on here is there anyone on here like that?.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
2,701 Posts
Hi Holla,

That sprocket is well and truly . . . . .KERNACKERED !!!!! . . (i am sure you new that really :rolleyes:)

Chain and sprocket's time methink's :thumb:

I would advise using a genuine honda front sprocket. . . . And a new keeper plate while you're at it.

P.S.
Which bit of manchester are you in ?
Do you intend to take the RD03 off road ?

P.P.S.
Chain and rear sprocket is ok from cheapest supplier (decent quality chain ) but use honda front sprocket.
Honda front sprocket is fitted with numbers facing you.
The uneven wear on front sprocket may be due to wear on the chain runner on the swingarm pushing chain slightly off line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Hi Holla, As BIGROG said, Original front sprocket have a rubber on it facing to the outside. It looks like a new set is needed for your bike. Play it safe and go for a complete set. I recommend Honda original, Get a price from Hunts of Manchester I think cost will be similar as the after market one.
Cheers..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks simba i'll give Hunts a ring monday morning, As for taking it offroad airwolf i dont think so, I'm going to spend some time and at this rate a lot of money to get it back to its former glory, As for where abouts in manchester i am, its swinton/worsley border.

Thanks again guys

Ian
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,170 Posts
Holla

Have a look at this thread...

http://www.xrv.org.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=29008&highlight=chain+sprocket


I bought a DID gold X ring chain, OE Honda front sprocket, and Renthal hard anodised alloy rear sprocket for mine.

It is literally "you get what you pay for" so I buy often go for the package deals that have an X ring chain, then buy a Honda front from David Silvers.

Interestingly enough, I always use a Honda front like many people on here, but when I changed everything, found that the pattern front sprocket meshed better and was a much tighter fit on the shaft splines.

One investment it took me a long while to commit to was a Scottoiler, because I just thought they were a lot of money for a bit of plastic! Anyway, I don't regret this decision and would highly recommend it if your budget can stretch to one.

Remember, if you order from Busters, you can use a discount code from this forum to get an extra 10% discount.


Good Luck


Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
One investment it took me a long while to commit to was a Scottoiler, because I just thought they were a lot of money for a bit of plastic! Anyway, I don't regret this decision and would highly recommend it if your budget can stretch to one.

Remember, if you order from Busters, you can use a discount code from this forum to get an extra 10% discount.


Good Luck


Bob
sorry for thread hijack :rolleyes: what scotty kit did you get Bob and was it easy to fit ??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,170 Posts
Hey Alan!

No problem, I'll answer the Scottoiler question as it may benefit others.

Busters were doing a promotion quite a while back for the "Universal Kit" and were including the "Dual Feed Head" (or whatever it's called!)

After a bit of headscratching, I decided on how I wanted to install it, and it works VERY well.

I've mounted the Scottoiler unit onto the front left radiator guard, high up, to the left next to the side fairing. This way it can be nicely adjusted from the seat, even on the move (although I wouldn't recommend this!!). Just make sure it clears the forks!

I routed the clear tube down the back of the rad, across the top of the crankcase, and this meets the solid black tube just past the swingarm pivot point. I then routed the solid back tube on the underneath of the swingarm, using the chain slider, and a few dobs of silicon to locate it. It then makes it's way to the Dual Feed Head.

I removed the lower chainguard, and remounted it using the long bolt Scottoiler provides to mount the Dual Feed Head in a perfect position.

You cannot see any of my Scottoiler installation, you have to look very close to know it's there. An advantage of the long tube running from front to rear is that it gives you an extra little bit of oil capacity, and pre-warms the oil as it runs over the crankcase, making it flow easier.



Hope that Helps!



Bob :thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
Hey Alan!

No problem, I'll answer the Scottoiler question as it may benefit others.

Busters were doing a promotion quite a while back for the "Universal Kit" and were including the "Dual Feed Head" (or whatever it's called!)

After a bit of headscratching, I decided on how I wanted to install it, and it works VERY well.

I've mounted the Scottoiler unit onto the front left radiator guard, high up, to the left next to the side fairing. This way it can be nicely adjusted from the seat, even on the move (although I wouldn't recommend this!!). Just make sure it clears the forks!

I routed the clear tube down the back of the rad, across the top of the crankcase, and this meets the solid black tube just past the swingarm pivot point. I then routed the solid back tube on the underneath of the swingarm, using the chain slider, and a few dobs of silicon to locate it. It then makes it's way to the Dual Feed Head.

I removed the lower chainguard, and remounted it using the long bolt Scottoiler provides to mount the Dual Feed Head in a perfect position.

You cannot see any of my Scottoiler installation, you have to look very close to know it's there. An advantage of the long tube running from front to rear is that it gives you an extra little bit of oil capacity, and pre-warms the oil as it runs over the crankcase, making it flow easier.



Hope that Helps!



Bob :thumbup:

Thanks Bob that sounds a tidy bit of work :thumbup:think I'm going to get one and join the modern world :rolleyes:

Alan
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top