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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All
Appreciate that this question may of been covered in the past, however, when doing a quick search nothing pops up.

Considering purchasing either one of the above at the moment. I've owned a RD07 in the past but I've no experience of either of the older machines (haven't even seen one in the flesh).

I understand that the question is a wee bit down to personal preference however would be great to get some feedback from those who own or have owned any of these machines BobA etc)

Will be doing around 45mins commute each day (so not a huge amount of miles) and hopefully manage to get ten days of touring later in the summer. Will be garaged in the winter.

Any help/advice folk can offer would be great. I'm leaning towards an RD03 at the moment (but this is driven more by heart/looks etc than maybe common sense).

Again thanks in advance for any help
 

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You obviously realise I'm totally biased :D

If you've owned and ridden an RD07 you'll know all about them, so I guess what you need to do is plonk your butt on an RD03 or RD04 for a test ride.

I'm going to be totally honest and say what drew me to AT's were their looks. A RWB AT just looked so right to me, and I ended up with what I thought was a raggedy old RD03 as my first AT. It was an ace bike it turned out after some fettling, but after some major tinkering I lost interest in it and sold it.

I've been through a few RD04's and RD03's since then, so here's my opinion.


Both are quite old, so in my eyes you're buying something verging on classic.

Both are similar, but the RD03 has the extra status of being the first AT and having that quirky disc cover and factory headlamp guard. (Swiss RD03's have a square headlamp)

There's talk that the RD03 is lighter and nimbler. Well it may well be a bit lighter, and I think a slightly narrower rear wheel/tyre combination make it that bit more agile. I don't know what the weight difference really is, but on the occasions I've picked the RD03 up, it seemed to come up easier, but I suppose that may have been adrenaline and how many people were watching me!!

The motor is slightly sweeter and feels less vibey, which in turn makes it feel less powerful but has the benefit of less vibes through the bars. The feeling of less power never really translated in road speed on my bikes, as they all seem to perform about the same.

RD03's only came in red, white, blue livery (as far as I'm aware) and none were officially sold in the UK, so that makes them a little bit rarer again.

If you buy an RD03, some Transalp parts will fit.

If you buy an RD04, some RD07 parts fit.

RD03 and RD04 bodywork is NOT the same but can be interchanged. Tank and front side panels are the same but liveries are not.

Fuel economy is probably about the same, but I suppose an RD03 should in theory be better and go further. A tank range of 200-220 miles should be about right assuming you're not wringing it's neck out of every corner!

It's "horses for courses" I suppose, and it will probably come down to what's available in your price range, and whether you want to buy one to tinker with. Both RD04's and RD03's seem to be getting a bit rarer, especially good ones, and the knock on effect probably means it makes people covet them a bit more.

I'm a tight old sod, and have only ever bought cheap ones that need work, as I love to tinker with them, but to be honest they just don't seem to come up as often as they used to now.

Usual warnings apply with earlier bikes, but you have to be more vigilant because of their age. Mileage is not really a factor, but overall condition and originality is. Check the output shaft, wheels, brakes. There are other silly gremlins, but those are the main 3 which could end up costing you a lot more money. If you're happy to work on it yourself and it does have faults you can rectify, use those to lever the price down.

Good Luck


Bob :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Bob
lots to be thinking about. Really appreciate all your help and advice. No doubt be coming back to you in the near future for more words of wisdom

You obviously realise I'm totally biased :D

If you've owned and ridden an RD07 you'll know all about them, so I guess what you need to do is plonk your butt on an RD03 or RD04 for a test ride.

I'm going to be totally honest and say what drew me to AT's were their looks. A RWB AT just looked so right to me, and I ended up with what I thought was a raggedy old RD03 as my first AT. It was an ace bike it turned out after some fettling, but after some major tinkering I lost interest in it and sold it.

I've been through a few RD04's and RD03's since then, so here's my opinion.


Both are quite old, so in my eyes you're buying something verging on classic.

Both are similar, but the RD03 has the extra status of being the first AT and having that quirky disc cover and factory headlamp guard. (Swiss RD03's have a square headlamp)

There's talk that the RD03 is lighter and nimbler. Well it may well be a bit lighter, and I think a slightly narrower rear wheel/tyre combination make it that bit more agile. I don't know what the weight difference really is, but on the occasions I've picked the RD03 up, it seemed to come up easier, but I suppose that may have been adrenaline and how many people were watching me!!

The motor is slightly sweeter and feels less vibey, which in turn makes it feel less powerful but has the benefit of less vibes through the bars. The feeling of less power never really translated in road speed on my bikes, as they all seem to perform about the same.

RD03's only came in red, white, blue livery (as far as I'm aware) and none were officially sold in the UK, so that makes them a little bit rarer again.

If you buy an RD03, some Transalp parts will fit.

If you buy an RD04, some RD07 parts fit.

RD03 and RD04 bodywork is NOT the same but can be interchanged. Tank and front side panels are the same but liveries are not.

Fuel economy is probably about the same, but I suppose an RD03 should in theory be better and go further. A tank range of 200-220 miles should be about right assuming you're not wringing it's neck out of every corner!

It's "horses for courses" I suppose, and it will probably come down to what's available in your price range, and whether you want to buy one to tinker with. Both RD04's and RD03's seem to be getting a bit rarer, especially good ones, and the knock on effect probably means it makes people covet them a bit more.

I'm a tight old sod, and have only ever bought cheap ones that need work, as I love to tinker with them, but to be honest they just don't seem to come up as often as they used to now.

Usual warnings apply with earlier bikes, but you have to be more vigilant because of their age. Mileage is not really a factor, but overall condition and originality is. Check the output shaft, wheels, brakes. There are other silly gremlins, but those are the main 3 which could end up costing you a lot more money. If you're happy to work on it yourself and it does have faults you can rectify, use those to lever the price down.

Good Luck


Bob :thumbup:
 
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