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adventurer
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94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was third time now when my AT rear wheel bearing got broken and it's the worst :angry8::

(Made in Switzerland)
Fortunately it didn’t do any serious damage to the hubs bearing slot, only minor scratches.
Now installed some *** bearings and in shop they said you can't get any better, so let’s see but I seriously doubt about that it was the last time for me to change them.

Anyway I showed the broken bearing to one engineer in my company and he was not surprised. He said it's normal because the bearing is under dimensioned and can't handle static load and there is no difference what brand bearings you use – they will brake sooner or later. Obviously later is better but anyway he suggested to try cylindrical roller bearings (NUP style) that can handle axial forces as well.

From SKF page (6203 2RS and NUP 203 EC):


From parameters table you can see that the cylindrical roller bearing handles almost 2x more dynamic load and 3x more static load than ball bearing.
So anyone know good reason why not to try cylindrical roller bearing instead of 6203?
If anyone doesn't I'll give it a try next time.
 

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1,007 Posts
Hi Gotham,

Caged ball bearings are often used as they will accept axial as well as radial loads. Important in car applications but not so much in bikes. Their wider use makes them much cheaper usually.

If your previous bearings failed through normal wear and tear, I would look at the fatigue load limit, which is nearly nine times higher on the roller bearings. Provided there are no significant axial loads, I can't see why they wouldn't work (based on experience rather than knowledge), but it might be worth a call to a bearing manufacturer to check. Please let us know what you find, as I've had to change mine twice.

Apologies if I'm being patronising, but is the wheel running true? This many failures seems a bit excessive. Bent axle, damaged spacer tube, etc could all put undue side load on the bearing. Drifting the bearing on the inner race may also cause chipping and early failure. Sorry if I'm insulting your work, don't know whether you changed them yourself or got the shop to do it.

Tim
 

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adventurer
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94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
... This many failures seems a bit excessive. Bent axle, damaged spacer tube, etc could all put undue side load on the bearing. Drifting the bearing on the inner race may also cause chipping and early failure. Sorry if I'm insulting your work, don't know whether you changed them yourself or got the shop to do it...
I change bearings for myself and properly. Thay have lasted between 20 000 to 40 000km. Rear wheel with everything is in good condition. But I ride my bike quite hard; trails, mud, sand, small jumps...
Now I got XR4 for that and maybe now the bearing last longer.

Cheers
 

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2,144 Posts
I had 2 cheapo Wemoto bearings collapse almost immediately. Shoved a Koyo in there and all ok again (Been bouncing around lanes in Spain since)
 

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1,179 Posts
Yeap, I gotta do mine too.
I bashed the axle out ( siezed in situ) and broke them in the process.
As my project RD07A had stood is a garden for three yrs unstarted I was NOT surprised!
:thumbup:
 

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White van man
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560 Posts
I had one of these fail in Spain a couple of years back. Then a pal had the same one fail coming off the ferry in Plymouth.:confused:

Now i renew rear bearings every year when i do the big service.
 
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