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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys

I have a 1999(according to the Vin) and 2001 (First registration in South Africa) and the reg/rect has died. Reading here has kind of shown that you can maybe use a unit from another bike.

Any one done this successfully.

Waiting for delivery in South Africa is 3 weeks and I was due to go on a trip in 2 weeks time, Damn
 

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Enthusiastic AT rider
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I got a rectifier off an early Yamaha R1, about 2002 from eBay - half the price of a new MOSFET. Can't remember the actual number, but I have all the details at home. You have to alter the wiring to come directly off the battery. I bought a kit from 'Eastern Beaver', which is a bit pricey. I'm sure I read somewhere that the wiring and connectors off a Triumph Tiger are the same which is a lot cheaper. Here's a link which shows a Mosfet type rectifier and the connectors needed.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Voltage-...108371&hash=item362d574758:g:VVsAAOSw5vdanoEk
 

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At that price there's a good reason why the pics (and text) in that ebay ad don't indicate wether it's a FH marked genuine MOSFET R/R.


https://www.superhawkforum.com/forums/classifieds-32/superhawk-mosfet-rr-kit-$125-50-a-34792

I've a FH020 MOSFET on my Firestorm, one lined up for my Tiger 955 and still scratching my head to find sufficient space somewhere on my Transalp 650 to fit one, as its just a bit bigger than the OEM one.

Yes Triumph do a compatible lead plug kit (about £15-£20) but that still needs cutting and soldering/crimping tools and skills to fit.

Secondhand FH MOSFET for £55 from MT09 > https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2015-Yamaha-MT09-Regulator/142615137201
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies guys .

I opted for the original, R3500, $280 or roughly 200 pounds, not sure how wise that was but the original lasted 17 years. Delivery time from Japan 2 to 3 weeks, lets hope it gets here by then.

Going on a trip in a few weeks and rather opted for reliability.
 

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i bought two chinese cheap ones off ebay, one fitted and one spare to change on the road if the first one died, lasted four years, sold the bike and first one was still going strong
 

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I replaced my original with an R1 unit. It had the same number of wires as the original. All I had to do was cut and splice the original connector with a soldering iron, heat shrink to cover splices and everything tucked back into the original sheathing. No need to wire to the battery - just plug and play.
 

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Not sure if I've posted here, although I joined some years ago after I bought my then new '03 Transalp, So I'm not sure of the protocols. I might have to visit the intro thread next. A word of advice I give to members with this issue on Transalp.org. My original trade is electrician, and after reading that Hondas have a habit of cooking reg/recs I did some research and found that the big isue is poor earth return. The guts of it is that manufacturers rely on frame earth return to complete the circuit. On bikes that are intended to be ridden on unsealed roads it is best to run a wire directly from the reg/rec mounting bolt to the battery negative, as I did many years ago. My '03 Transalp still runs its original reg/rec.
Poor earth return causes heat build up at the mounting point which in turn cooks the electronics inside the unit as they try to overcome reduced output this causes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The replacement gets quite warm to the touch, how does one know when it is overly hot.

Should probably just add the extra earth for safety sake
 

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I would buy a volt meter and monitor that the honda reg rec will always get warm and maybe use your lights all the time. keep them on
 

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The replacement gets quite warm to the touch, how does one know when it is overly hot.

Should probably just add the extra earth for safety sake
My advice is YES, run a dedicated negative return wire, because currently you are depending on the contact between bike frame and reg / rec frame, which is prone to deteriorate with age and surface rust. The reg / rec will generate heat to varying degrees as it has to dissipate any excess energy the alternator produces.
A simple explanation is that most modern bike alternators have fixed excitation (permanent magnet) rotating field and the ouput is directly related to engine speed. Low revs mean low output, high revs mean high output, whether you need it or not. The amount of output the bike can use is turned into power out, any extra is turned into heat and radiats out of the body. A poor earth return will cause extra heat at the point of frame contact making the unit hotter than they are designed to get and eventually burns them out.
Most modern car alternators use a wound rotating field, and the regulator decides how much electromagnetic excitation is required to get the right output, so they deliver the right amount of output even at high engine revs.
 

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I had this issue fairly early on in my at ownership. I fitted an fz1 item fh0011 from memory, used Halfords sourced parts and some wire I asked my local garage for and we're away. Fit and forget.
 
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