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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I plan to replace the clutch springs and plates on my 99 Dommie this weekend. The problems have been:

- terrible clutch action described by the MOT tester as like 'pulling on a rubber brick'
- clutch sticking when cold and then releasing with a bang.
- clutch slip
- and now the clutch cable has just given up.

I have a new cable and heavy duty spring/plate set, which seem easy to fit.

Is this likely to cure the problem or should I check anything else when doing it?

Any advice much appreciated.

Cheers

Jon
 

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I want to order a new clutch next week so I am going to watch this guys other videos.
As I have never done a clutch before I have a couple of questions.
Do the EBC clutch kits that are for sale on the web come with a gasket or do I have to buy it seperately and what is the difference between standard springs and the heavy duty ones?
Do heavy duty springs mean a heavier clutch action at the clutch lever?
Thanks for the heads up about the videos ,just goes to show your never too old to learn something new. :thumbup:
 

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I haven't a Dommie anymore but advice should be the same.
Changed my XT last month and fitted EBC plates and heavy springs.
Heavy springs I think were designed more for dirt bikes which get some serious stick.
Heavy springs make the clutch about 10-15% heavier. If this were my Airhead BM I'd worry, but XTs, Dommies etc have such a light clutch, I saw and see no issues. I can report that my clutch is still very light.
No, the clutch kit will not come with a gasket.
 

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I found an EBC clutch in Germany that comes with stronger springs and a gasket so I will order it today so it should be here next week:thumbup:

http://www.ebay.de/itm/251751728577?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT

The price in Germany including postage is cheaper than it costs in England so I will order it from there as you Brits are gonna vote to leave Europe and leave us poor old expats on our own. :D:D:D

Vote in! or we are going to stop sending you all our excelllent Danissssssh bacon and keep it for ourselves. :clown::clown::clown:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the video link. It's a really clear explanation and I watched his gearbox videos too - learned a lot.

So instilled with confidence I set about replacing the clutch today. The old cable was pretty stiff so I think that was causing some of the problems. Put a new Honda one on. Then I put on a new set of EBC heavy duty plates and springs. The old springs were a good bit shorter and the plates looked worn next to the new ones. There were some grooves in the basket but only on a few edges, and they didn't feel deep enough to take it off and file down. Didn't have a spare gasket so used some sealant on the old one.

Clutch is now better than I can ever remember with a really smooth springy action. Unfortunately until I get used to it I either stall or shoot off like a rabbit fired from a cannon. Haven't checked if any slip yet, until I go for a run.
 

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The plates will take a while to bed in, a good tip if you are planning on filing the basket is to be very careful and make sure the fingers are all the same width, if you go to town and make them different thicknesses the fingers won't contact the plates evenly which cause them to wear unevenly and leads to weird clutch action and wear.
I used to replace a lot of clutches in two stroke dirt bikes, when you buy the pack of plates, cut the pack so the plastic forms a bowl, then just leave the plates to soak in gearbox oil overnight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The job took me a leisurely 4 hours which included neighbour chats and a trip to Halfords. It wasn't hard and the weather was nice. My neighbour told me he fixed his slipping clutch by sticking an extra plate in it and adding a washer to the clutch rod to make it a bit longer. Seemed a bit radical but he said it stopped the slipping.
 

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Good to know, my clutch should be here mid-week and I am planning to fit it with my teenage son so he can get hands on experience for when he has to do his own bike one day.
Lad n dad day with a six pack and order in pizza when we are done....Dont get much better than that.:thumbup:
 

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My neighbour told me he fixed his slipping clutch by sticking an extra plate in it and adding a washer to the clutch rod to make it a bit longer. Seemed a bit radical but he said it stopped the slipping.
Manufacturers can make mistakes and I'm all for 'fixes', but:

Maybe he had wear somewhere
Maybe he was using fully synth which can make some clutches slip
Maybe he bought bad plates
Maybe he used old weak springs
Maybe he used the wrong springs
Maybe he wheelied a lot.
Maybe he adjusted his cable badly.

Of course these are just my thoughts, I don't want him coming after me :D
 

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I had a 349 montessa trials bike years ago which i geared up so i could use it for trail riding but the clutch used to slip in top gear so i fixed it by adding an extra pair of plates, which are all metal no fibre plates and machined a new bush to take up the travel needed to operate it all. I sold it on and told the guy that bought it what i done but he didnt keep it long and sold it himself but forgot to tell the new owner, I can just picture someone arguing about having two plates short when replacing the parts :D
 
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