Honda XRV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Sir FallofaLott
Joined
·
5,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Let's hear your collective wisdom and techniques for riding downhill.

Now, I'm not talking about down a slope, I'm talking about a proper sheer drop in altitude :shock:

I'm thinking about somewhere like Wrynose Pass and Hardknot Pass.

The last time I rode these passes, I almost lost the bike from under me when the car in front stopped mid bend to talk to a lady cyclist.

I could feel the bike sliding down from under me with both brakes stamped on - had to roar at the cyclist to tell the car to pull in so I could get moving again.

Near the end of Hardknott, as you head into Eskdale, there's a viscious left hander that drops and turns 180 at the same time - I seriously misjudged it and almost came a cropper.

Mind it was so much fun I turned around and did it again :D

So, speak up riding gods, share your techniques.

I rode them on a closed throttle and the back brake, but instinctively went for fethering the clutch in some places, which is when I nearly came a cropper.
 

·
Older, but no wiser!
Joined
·
3,836 Posts
I'm certainly no "riding God" but managed to survive two days in the Dolomites where on some of the Passes at times, every bend seemed to be a full 180 hairpin or more! I tend to be very keen on feathering the back brake into the bend, and never touch the clutch, except to change gear either before or coming out of the bend.

The TA is I think, excellent at this sort of nadgery, wide out on the entry, gentle trailing throttle and then on the juice asap to bring the bike upright, punch through the gears and do it all again. Bliss :thumbup:

You can never be certain where the errant car driver will stop though...! You survived so must have been awake ;)
 
C

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I've ridden this road in the wet and fully loaded (2 zegas, tankbag and 60l drybag). Even in the dry the bike was sliding in first gear with both wheels locked, not nice, in the wet :shock: And that's before trying to negotiate the steps. In the wet it was definitely the most frightening thing I've done on a bike, after it tarmac hairpins are nothing :D But yeah, a combination of brakes on and off (fast!) and clutch keeping it on the verge of stalling while sliding got down ok - I fell twice, once having to drop it deliberately to stop sliding sideways into a wall at about 15mph, but no harm done.



 

·
OVALTEENY !!!
Joined
·
6,063 Posts
Just be in the right gear at an appropriate speed and smooth on the throttle

Your main braking will still come from the front tyre so don't be afraid to load up the front but do it progressively. Move your body weight back over the rear tyre by extending your legs and squat down as you do it creating a bit more rear wheel traction enabling the rear brake to also slow you down

Hope it helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
In tight down hill turns I would say that I apply the same technique as normal, just with a lighter touch...

Slow down for the corner and gently gas out: I mean gently so that the bike does not lurch, but I will say that I control it with back brake: something I don't do in faster, open bends....

I find it easier to smooth out acceleration with the rear brake than by using throttle alone...
 

·
???
Joined
·
495 Posts
What sort of speeds are we talking here? I am familiar with the wrynose and hardknot, just picturing that steep left hander in my mind makes me think of about 10mph in first...... In winter????




Chicken cluck cluck :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
my theory is virtually the same as everybody elses, basially wide out on entry no front brake engine and rear brake to get round and when 1/2 way throttle to pull it round and upright

cbrpaddy - where is that road it looks good to try?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
cbrpaddy - where is that road it looks good to try?
I subscribe to the following and its done me ok over the years.
A low gear, both brakes prior to the bend making sure you have the right speed for it, ease off the front and only the rear to stop it running away.

Come on paddy where's your road.
It looks to be on the Burren.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,065 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,162 Posts
:hitler: going down steep bendy bits....swing wide and then drop in to the bend.. use the back brake initially but as has been pointed out the front is taking alot of the load but as you will be banking over try to only give it a fist full while vertical and straight, so it dont wash out :D.. then ease to a geltle finger pressure .. look where your going and go where you are looking.. keep it moving .. if some pr!ck stops in front of you.. us the HORN :thumbup:.. if you have to come to a quick stop.. get the bike vertical and the bars straight.. ohh and check the camber ( important for me as I need to ensure that the wee legs can reach the ground.. if I cant then I move past the obstruction and then lean on THAT :angel9: )
great fun:blob7:

going down vertical drops.. close eyes.. always helps..:angel9:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,481 Posts
some of us got riding the haardknot pass on the way up to TLD 09 starting point.
It was a lovely day...wet and really windy with a french driver trying to reverse onto an airpin while meesh was just coming up behind him....and that was summer!:thumbleft:
I used a simple technique on the way up....first and second, trying to ignore the brown trail I was leaving behind and thinking to myself "...wheelie I will kill you at the first fag stop...":mad:

Then on the way down, same technique but riding a bit faster to try and beat the brown stuff dripping down from the saddle.....:D


and BTW Chris I loved it!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,162 Posts
some of us got riding the haardknot pass on the way up to TLD 09 starting point.
It was a lovely day...wet and really windy with a french driver trying to reverse onto an airpin while meesh was just coming up behind him....and that was summer!:thumbleft:
I used a simple technique on the way up....first and second, trying to ignore the brown trail I was leaving behind and thinking to myself "...wheelie I will kill you at the first fag stop...":mad:

Then on the way down, same technique but riding a bit faster to try and beat the brown stuff dripping down from the saddle.....:D


and BTW Chris I loved it!!!
try doing it on BSA 650 the Drum brakes:angel9:

or as my mate did with a 650 bonny ( with a high ratio box..mmmm I smell ferrodo ( not the Hobbit.. that would be just wrong :hitler: )


no brown stuff just a beaming grin:angel9:
 
C

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
For those that asked it's the Green Road and it's in the Burren alright, can't get anything past you guys !
 

·
OVALTEENY !!!
Joined
·
6,063 Posts
some of us got riding the haardknot pass on the way up to TLD 09 starting point.
It was a lovely day...wet and really windy with a french driver trying to reverse onto an airpin while meesh was just coming up behind him....and that was summer!:thumbleft:
I used a simple technique on the way up....first and second, trying to ignore the brown trail I was leaving behind and thinking to myself "...wheelie I will kill you at the first fag stop...":mad:

Then on the way down, same technique but riding a bit faster to try and beat the brown stuff dripping down from the saddle.....:D


and BTW Chris I loved it!!!
Way too much information but glad you made it
 

·
OVALTEENY !!!
Joined
·
6,063 Posts
try doing it on BSA 650 the Drum brakes:angel9:

or as my mate did with a 650 bonny ( with a high ratio box..mmmm I smell ferrodo ( not the Hobbit.. that would be just wrong :hitler: )


no brown stuff just a beaming grin:angel9:
My BSA 650 Lightning Clubman had a close ratio gearbox. First would go up to 80 mph. I had AM4 race linings in the brakes. The brakes were too good for the stock suspension though.:toothy9:

I would never have taken it over those passes though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,162 Posts
My BSA 650 Lightning Clubman had a close ratio gearbox. First would go up to 80 mph. I had AM4 race linings in the brakes. The brakes were too good for the stock suspension though.:toothy9:

I would never have taken it over those passes though
my mates bonny needed a rest half way up ( it faded due to overheating.. better that than seizing :angel9: once it had cooled a wee bit if puffed its way to the top )) ( the A10 was a golden flash so all Iron and had the 19 tooth primary drive sprocket, so woulds only do 70 flat out.. great fot the lakes, I would replace the 22T one with it just for 'lakeland' roads :)) 4 gears ha those where the days :thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,811 Posts
Just be in the right gear at an appropriate speed and smooth on the throttle

Your main braking will still come from the front tyre so don't be afraid to load up the front but do it progressively. Move your body weight back over the rear tyre by extending your legs and squat down as you do it creating a bit more rear wheel traction enabling the rear brake to also slow you down

Hope it helps
I was going to say that! I'd add that your braking should be done (mainly) in a straight line. You shouldn't need to use brakes in the bend. I don't understand the advice given here by many to use the rear brake in the bend; engine braking should be ample to stop it running away mid-bend.
 

·
Matron
Joined
·
12,080 Posts
Let's hear your collective wisdom and techniques for riding downhill.

Now, I'm not talking about down a slope, I'm talking about a proper sheer drop in altitude :shock:

I'm thinking about somewhere like Wrynose Pass and Hardknot Pass.

The last time I rode these passes, I almost lost the bike from under me when the car in front stopped mid bend to talk to a lady cyclist.

I could feel the bike sliding down from under me with both brakes stamped on - had to roar at the cyclist to tell the car to pull in so I could get moving again.

Near the end of Hardknott, as you head into Eskdale, there's a viscious left hander that drops and turns 180 at the same time - I seriously misjudged it and almost came a cropper.

Mind it was so much fun I turned around and did it again :D

So, speak up riding gods, share your techniques.

I rode them on a closed throttle and the back brake, but instinctively went for fethering the clutch in some places, which is when I nearly came a cropper.

My technique for Hardknott was keep your feet down, eyes closed and cry when the mean drivers won't move over :D
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top