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What is the best way to loosen up links in the chain that are seizing and stiffening up? They are well lubed and Im pretty sure the chain is fairly new, I got at it with oil and pliers and started to get some movement but when you ride off in low gear and when the chain is under tension you can hear a clonking noise which im sure is the seized links. How would you suggest to loosen them when your on the road?
Cheers
 

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I would not take the chance, If the chain has seized links I would buy a new one, rather than risk a chain snapping.
 

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OVALTEENY !!!
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The best way to unsieze them is to leave a rag soaked in paraffin overnight on the siezed links as the thin oil will soak into the links.

Alternatively spray / soak the chain in WD40 or GT85 also a thin oil

Thoroughly clean all of this off afterwards (I use baby wipes for this bit) and lube up

Mine had these problems after the winter rides in the snow even though the chain was cleaned and lubed after each ride

The problem following on from this is now the chain needs replacing but it has been on for 22000 + miles ( I have a scottoiler:thumbup:)
 

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The Angry Pasty Muncher
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What is the best way to loosen up links in the chain that are seizing and stiffening up? They are well lubed and Im pretty sure the chain is fairly new, I got at it with oil and pliers and started to get some movement but when you ride off in low gear and when the chain is under tension you can hear a clonking noise which im sure is the seized links. How would you suggest to loosen them when your on the road?
Cheers
iN THE PAST I'VE JUST REMOVED the chain from the bike and left it to soak in either parafin or deisel for a few days occasionally working each link to free it up. Then just blow it out refit to the bike tension up make sure it's well lubed and ride on check each day to see if it's any better
 

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Stiff links are usually caused by dirt or corrossion !!

The only way is to soak the chain in parrafin, Petrol, deisel, degreaser, WD40 etc and then work out the grime by hand.

In some cases, tight links are caused by stretch or warp but thats unlikely if you've kept the tension correct.

The downside to soaking the chain (if its an 0-ring or X-ring), is that you will also strip the seals of the lubricating grease that they hold. After that, the chain will need to be oiled regularly and treated like a non 0-ring chain.
 

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The Angry Pasty Muncher
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Stiff links are usually caused by dirt or corrossion !!

The only way is to soak the chain in parrafin, Petrol, deisel, degreaser, WD40 etc and then work out the grime by hand.

In some cases, tight links are caused by stretch or warp but thats unlikely if you've kept the tension correct.

The downside to soaking the chain (if its an 0-ring or X-ring), is that you will also strip the seals of the lubricating grease that they hold. After that, the chain will need to be oiled regularly and treated like a non 0-ring chain.
Agree'd but parafin will not damage the O'Rings
 

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May Contain Nuts
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don't risk it if it is seized- replace it
I'd go with that,

I had some stiff links on one of my chains and managed to free them up only to have the chain snap a while later.

I was VERY luck that it only broke the link on one side and I spotted it while I was stopped to get some fuel, I dread to think what would have happened if I didn't.

there's no way I'd risk it on another chain
 

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Ultimately, if the chain is that bad, it is safer to replace it.

A chain that snaps at 30mph COULD lock the wheel, smash the engine casing, and may just catapult you off the bike.

If you cannot get a new chain, I would remove the back wheel and let the chain lay in a container/trough of paraffin or light oil (old engine oil will do if you can't get anything else) and leave it there overnight. Rotate the chain at some point so that the bit not in the oil bath gets to lay in there for a few hours as well.

This will give you time to inspect the front and rear sprockets and do some other routine maintenance.



Good Luck



Bob :thumbup:
 

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take it off and boil it in Parafin

then put it back on the gas in a tin of moywax ( wax with graphite and molebdimumdisulphide in it)

then get a row from your mother :) for stinking the kitchen out :hitler: :D

sorry this is what we did 30 years ago pre- o ring chains and with 30-40bhp... :D

replace it if the bike has been stored for a while ,as this could be due to corrosion..

if the bike is in regular use, well lubed, and so its just due to crud and cold weather , give the chain a good clean with 'carb cleaner' after a run ( chain is hot) then a good lube.. keep an eye on it.. but I would change it soon as:thumbup:

ohh I need to get my XLV back on the road I do miss the shaft.. so to speak:rolleyes:
 

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Im pretty sure the chain is fairly new
Whatever that means. Could I interprete this as "The chain might have been on the bike for 10 years, but as it has not been ridden for 10 years, the chain is not worn?
Even if such a chain has good measurements - it doesn´t stick because it´s supposed to be sticking. It´s sticking most probably because the grease inside (kept there by the O- or X-rings) is either gone or has gone bad. You won´t get the grease back to a good state; what you can do by "bathing" the chain is making it more flexible for some time, but it will not have the same lubrication as it is supposed to have and may suffer increased internal wear and tear and run warmer inside than it would usually do, lacking proper lubrication.

IMHO, a chain which has not been maintained properly will not get back into good shape, whatever you do. If I were you, I´d get a new DID X-Ring VM2 chain including a new set of sprockets instead of worrying about the chain letting go suddenly and kill me. Additionally, a chain stumbling over the teeth of the front sprocket will put additional strain on the front sprocket, which is the last thing the output shaft needs, really.

Cheers
Chris
 
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