Honda XRV Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking for a replacement regulator for my XRV750 RD07A, and after some reading I decided to try the
SH847AA regulator ( since it also allows me to do a LED conversion without any concerns regarding the extra heat dissipation ).

It seems that the 2014 Suzuki VStrom 1000 regulator is supposed to be an original Shindengen SH847AA, so instead of risking buying some counterfeit stuff, I ordered that, bought a cable for the fh020aa/fh012aa/sh775 regulators, which has the same plugs as the SH847AA ( I had to cut and adapt the other ends )

I had to grind/drill a metal plate to adapt this, given the extra size, but there's still plenty of room inside the fairing to accommodate it.

I have been testing this for some time and it seems to work great ( always outputting a steady 14v, according to the meter ), so I am just sharing my experience, in case it is useful for anyone else.

( to do: get some more washers and a longer bolt for the top )


Grille Hood Automotive lighting Vehicle Car


Hood Grille Bumper Automotive tire Automotive exterior
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
Interesting...I had to do some googling so it's actually a linear voltage regulator but still employs a Mosfet type shunt. I'm assuming
those 2 green output wires go to the battery with the positive side fused to a 30 amp fuse?



People also ask



Is a linear voltage regulator a MOSFET?


A linear regulator employs an active (BJT or MOSFET) pass device (series or shunt) controlled by a high gain differential amplifier. It compares the output voltage with a precise reference voltage and adjusts the pass device to maintain a constant output voltage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I connected it to the original harness ( not directly to the battery ).

The round plug where the red/green wires go is still in good condition, so I got another plug from a damaged regulator ( My mechanic got me one from the junk pile ). The yellow wires ( from the stator to the regulator ) are connected directly to each other, since the plug there was a bit toasted already.

Actually the bike was running great, but I wanted to prevent a very well known issue...

I know this is "overkill" perhaps, but, since this regulator apparently has the ability to interrupt the unused current instead of converting it into heat like the original regulator, I thought it would be suitable for a LED conversion ( which I also did ).

Besides, it is used in bikes with much bigger engines ( and revving capability ), so I hope it lasts forever in this bike.

I have been running this for several weeks now, monitored with a voltage meter... Only time will tell now, but I just wanted to share this experiment ( and my conclusions ). So far it seems to work great.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top