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Wing Commander
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14,437 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

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Wing Commander
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Discussion Starter #3
just out of curiosity chris, who does get the money generated from the speed cameras ?
About half to the course provider for running the course and half to the police for administering it.
 

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Wing Commander
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Discussion Starter #5
what i actually meant was, who normally gets the money just for a straightforward camera collar?
The Treasury.

It used to go to the partnerships that installed and ran them (Police, councils etc) but Labour changed that because of concerns they were only it for the money. Instead the government got the cash and then gave grants for road safety back to the partnership.

The current government has cut the grants and keeps the profits from the fines.
 

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Wing Commander
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Discussion Starter #9

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Registered
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6,174 Posts
Joe Bloggs gets wrongfully reported for speeding. Rather than contest it, Joe Bloggs opts for a course. He's done that on the basis that he's not admitted guilt and it has not been proved that he is guilty of an offence. If the CII have it their way, this would need to be reported to the insurer so they could then load the premium.

Fred Bloggs (speeding runs in the family so maybe having a speeding relative needs to be disclosed too) gets caught on a deserted 30mph urban dual carriageway at 37mph at 2.30am. It's just been changed from 40mph and he wasn't paying enough attention to the signage. He goes on a course and this gives him greater awareness of speed limits and modifies his behaviour. He is now less likely to speed and more likely to pay attention than before as he has been educated. The CII and insurers would like to have his course attendance reported to them so they can load his premium. Now he presents a lower risk than before yet his premium increases.

It usually costs more to go on a course than to take the points and needs a day of work etc. If there is no advantage in doing the course, most people won't bother and so education is actively discouraged. It seems to me that insurers would rather someone is convicted and doesn't have to go on any course that would change their behaviour because they could then charge them more. Consequently they appear to be putting their profits ahead of general road safety.

I think insurers have far bigger issues they could be concentrating on rather than the odd case where someone decides to risk jail by making a false declaration that they haven't attended a speed awareness course in the last three years - but they don't like it up 'em do they ;)
 

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The Angry Pasty Muncher
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6,170 Posts
Speed awareness courses pants, i'm aware of my speed i sit here stationery typing this i'm doing roughly 16500mph add another 30mph on that for a ticket don't really make much odds. I go abroad on holiday i'm aware i'm doing roughly 650-700mph as the plane hits crusing speed. I would say i'm fairly aware of the speed i'm doing so no course needed :D:D:D
 

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Who are the directors of the companies who provide these courses?
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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6,031 Posts
A few weeks ago I got stopped on the A13 on my way home from work about 7pm.

Due to some of my riding habits, I was dreading the question, "Do you know why we've stopped you?". As the answer would depend on how long they had been watching me.

Instead he asked if I knew the speed limit on the Canning Town flyover, I said 30mph. He said they'd clocked me at 60mph minimum as I passed their hidey hole down the side.

Anyway, after checking my tax disc was present, looking up my insurance and licence details (clean) the copper told me that if I wanted to get a wiggle on (his words), to look down the side of flyovers when I pass them. The he drove off. Made my knees go a bit shaky for a little while though.
 

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Craigypops
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6,747 Posts

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Craigypops
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6,747 Posts
A few weeks ago I got stopped on the A13 on my way home from work about 7pm.

Due to some of my riding habits, I was dreading the question, "Do you know why we've stopped you?". As the answer would depend on how long they had been watching me.

Instead he asked if I knew the speed limit on the Canning Town flyover, I said 30mph. He said they'd clocked me at 60mph minimum as I passed their hidey hole down the side.

Anyway, after checking my tax disc was present, looking up my insurance and licence details (clean) the copper told me that if I wanted to get a wiggle on (his words), to look down the side of flyovers when I pass them. The he drove off. Made my knees go a bit shaky for a little while though.
You got off lightly there me old son, 60 in a 30, very naughty...



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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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You got off lightly there me old son, 60 in a 30, very naughty...
If I'm honest I've been let off for much worse, 100 in a 50, 80 in a 50, 50 in a 30 plus a few I can't recall properly. They mostly just end up as a friendly chat at the roadside, the only horrible coppers I've met have been through work.

I touched 90 overtaking a few cars on my Bikesafe course this year (single track A road with excellent foward visibility) and it wasn't even mentioned.

On the other hand I've had penalty points for crossing a double white line system (3), 58 in a 30 (3) and letting someone ride my bike without realising their insurance had lapsed (4). That was a bad year and took me close to a totting up ban.

I've had a clean licence (touch wood) since 1985. I dread getting points because then DVLA would take my tattered paper licence off me and I would end up with one of those poxy photo cards.
 

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Wing Commander
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14,437 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
So if you lend your bike to someone who says they are insured on their policy, you still get points? Ouch!
I find that difficult to understand too. If you lease your vehicle, it is still down to you to insure it. If you don't, this sort of ruling would suggest that the leasing company is also at fault.
 

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Older, but no wiser!
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3,836 Posts
I find that difficult to understand too. If you lease your vehicle, it is still down to you to insure it. If you don't, this sort of ruling would suggest that the leasing company is also at fault.
I wonder what the "get out" is on this. A close look at the fine print of a leasing/hp/hire agreement would probably give the answer.

Possibly a signed declaration from the person borrowing the bike/car?
 
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