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Discussion Starter #1
A couple of quick questions:

I understand stock gearing for the TA650 is 15/48? My recently acquired bike has a 16 tooth front. What is the usual reason for this change?

I read elsewhere that the use of aftermarket front sprockets (JT was specifically mentioned) is not recommended as they tend to damage splines in a way that genuine Honda ones don't. There's a big difference in price here between aftermarket and genuine so just wondering what further information may be available on this.

Many thanks.
 

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for any given speed, a larger front sprocket (or a smaller rear sprocket) will result in lower revs

i always use genuine honda front sprockets to avoid spline issues, i use aftermarket ones for the rear


 

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Discussion Starter #3
Can anyone confirm that the reason is that Honda's heat treatment/hardening of their sprockets is done so that the teeth are hard as possible but the splines are a bit softer? Thus, where the output shaft and sprocket meet, the sprocket takes the wear rather than the splines on the shaft? Conversely, aftermarket sprockets tend to be uniformly hardened and thus cause wear on the shaft?

I can never remember whether one tooth up on the front gears up or down, so thanks for confirming that. Is there a general consensus among TA owners that the bike is under geared? Is this a common mod? I assume that if I plan to toddle along on gravel roads with it (as I do) then it would be best to stick with stock gearing?
 

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think about when you ride a bicycle. the faster you go, the more you use a BIGGER cog on the front, or a SMALLER cog on the back

i think the 650 is a bit under geared for motorway work

i tried a one-tooth-smaller sprocket on the back, but it only reduced the revs by 500 at 70mph, so not much difference

my dad tried a bigger front sprocket on the 650 but it resulted in the sprocket touching the plastic sprocket cover

for gravel roads i would think the standard gearing is fine
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The bicycle analogy is a good way to remember.

I think I might go back to stock. Open road/motorway limit in NZ is 100kmh and I rarely go much faster than that these days. However, we have thousands of kilometres of twisty, unsealed rural gravel roads, which is where my TA will see a lot of mileage. Stock gearing would presumably make the bike a bit more flexible on these sorts of roads.

I had thought that a genuine front sprocket and an aftermarket rear would probably be the way to go and is probably what I will do.

Many thanks for the help.
 
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