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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I have a 2000 varadero 1000, which I bought as a non-runner to rebuild (I crashed my last one and so have many spare parts). The entire engine has been overhauled and it has been working as it should for around 2 months.
Now, when it gets warm (also sometimes when cold, but not so often), the starter motor seems to really struggle to turn the engine, as if the pistons were tight. Sometimes the starter clutch just slips, which was the issue when I bought it. It was rebuilt with the rest of the engine. I have scoured the forums and come up with several issues that sound possible and was looking for some feedback.....
Tight bore due to heat expansion
carb floats too high
timing too advanced (I hope it's this one)
The starter clutch will need to be looked at again, but could this make it seem stiff?

The battery is new, so is the rectifier. I have tried 2 starter motors, no change. I have checked earth connections. Valves and shims are not new as they were fine, the same goes with chains and tensioners.

I am not too knowledgable on mechanics (I did not do the rebuild myself) but I´m hoping to retard the timing slightly and hey presto (ever the optimist)! Does anybody have any ideas/advice?

Cheers from Spain
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This seems to be a common issue that I have seen many posts about, with a variety of possible solutions. I have finally found my problem and it's one that I have not seen anyone post about, so if any of you have this issue.... here's what was wrong with mine....
The starter motor drives a gear that is attached to a smaller cog, that then turns the flywheel (in pics). These 2 cogs are held together by friction only: they are press-fitted together. In my case, the larger cog has come slightly loose and was slipping on the spindle and not turning the smaller cog on the spindle. As the bike got hotter, it slipped more and more, and bump starting a varadero is no fun!
I had the spare piece from my spare bike, so I just changed it, but I imagine that you could easily fix the issue with pressure, or maybe a small weld etc. Access is simple: left engine cover off, flywheel assembly out, the cogs spin on a rod that simply pulls out. I had to remove 1 bolt from the cam chain guide to get the cogs past it, but all in all, it'a a half hour job that I could have done months ago and saved myself a lot of unnecessary work looking for the problem. I hope this helps someone.
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