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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


Well started off as a respray and well you long timers will know the crack :shock:

Rust everywhere :shock:
Bolts seized in the fairing :shock:
Both radiators need painting :shock:
Crack fairing lugs through rust building up on bolts and expanding :shock:
Light retainer bracket snapped in two :shock: :shock: :shock:
Dirty hands :shock:

Decided to hand paint the frame if the rust got hold god knows one thing worth noteing is the green fur you get on electrical connectors its just starting to do this so can nip it in the bud before it becomes a problem :lol:

Sigh going to be busy for a while and bikeless the xrv biggest problem rust strikes again :(
 

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Looks sort of neat like that. Do you have to put all the stuff back on again? After all the frame rails are probably more comfortable than the standard seat :lol:
 

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12 Inch, Is it possible to rust treat and repaint the frame with the engine still in? Just curious really as I may do a minor strip down over winter for the same reasons as you. A stitch in time saves nine ... as they say :roll:

Cheers :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
12 Inch, Is it possible to rust treat and repaint the frame with the engine still in? Just curious really as I may do a minor strip down over winter for the same reasons as you. A stitch in time saves nine ... as they say
Dont see why not just remember to mask of or remove any parts you dont wanna paint. Old bedsheet ideal light and can be tucked into awkward places.

I am using a coach enamel from halfords it has rust inhibitors already in it. Not priming just painting directly plus if any rubs off just give it a quick paint. You can also use hammerite smooth although I find how it comes out varies.

A rust inhibitor is only usefull if its eating into the metal if its surface rust just clean completely paint over.

Also replaceing all bolts with stainless if you just put he old ones in your wasteing your time :!:

Although anyone have any better ways please post am always learning.
 

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Cant stop 'tinkering'
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Guess it depends on how long you plan to keep the bike and how much you need to use it.

Just got myself an RD04 recently, and unfortunately, the frame is coated blue - i want it black, so will be breaking it down over the next few months to get it blasted and powdercoated again :roll:

Will be replacing non structural/load bearing bolts with stainless, and coppaslipping /loctiting where appropriate.

Never done this to a bike before, so i will have to take loads of pics, and bag and label bits up as i go so i can remember where it all goes :lol:

I know for sure, that some bolts are missing and some bits are not correctly fitted - so its an ideal time for me to check it all over.

As for painting, its all in the preperation as they say - spend most of your time on this, and youll get the best results. Painted my swingarm on my dommi black with hammerite smooth, and it looks powdercoated :!:
 

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A useful trick for getting everything back in place is to use sheets of cardboard.

Draw round the outline of what you've taken/about to take off and then stick the bolts through it in the places they came out of! Keeps 'em all nice and safe.

Got taught this trick by a mechanic.
 

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whys the rum always gone?
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12 inch . take heart in the fact that when you stand back and admire your hard work and the finished product looks a million dollars :shock:

you can say

look,look what ive created :shock:

you may be a bit fed up now but once you get started you wont know where to stop :shock: :lol: :lol: :lol:

good luck dude :wink:
 

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ignore the vain
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
12 inch . take heart in the fact that when you stand back and admire your hard work and the finished product looks a million dollars

you can say

look,look what ive created

you may be a bit fed up now but once you get started you wont know where to stop

good luck dude
Cheers man I am saving the nut and bolt jobby for a few years yet no point in a total strippy until major engine work is needed kill two birds with on stone so to speak.
 

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willb said:
A useful trick for getting everything back in place is to use sheets of cardboard.

Draw round the outline of what you've taken/about to take off and then stick the bolts through it in the places they came out of! Keeps 'em all nice and safe.

Got taught this trick by a mechanic.
Or tape the screws into the actual part as you take it off, or bag the screws and wire them to the part.
 

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pooh said:
12 Inch, Is it possible to rust treat and repaint the frame with the engine still in? Just curious really as I may do a minor strip down over winter for the same reasons as you. A stitch in time saves nine ... as they say :roll:

Cheers :)
It's possible, but how well it will last is debatable, like Anton says if you want a long lasting job you need to get in all those nooks and crannies and you can't realistically do this with the engine still in, if it's just a few spots then yes, if it's major rusting/ paint flaking, best bet is to strip it right down and get it bead blasted and powdercoated, how much time have you got to spare vs how long you want it to last (no pain, no gain) :?
 

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With my knowledge the prospect of a complete strip down although fun & interesting (i think) is very daunting. I think 1stly I need to get hold of a complete very comprehensive service manual. I cant seem to find one on the web other than the Haynes manuals. Any ideas?

Over the winter I think I'd definitely enjoy taking it to pieces and would learn alot aswell ... Need a bigger garage though :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
With my knowledge the prospect of a complete strip down although fun & interesting (i think) is very daunting. I think 1stly I need to get hold of a complete very comprehensive service manual
Takes pics with a digi cam of the trickiest bits once your memory is jogged you will remember there is not much to remove.

I am not doing a posh job of mine going for the satin rustic look. Thats why hand painting will do not keen on shiny bikes.
 

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Tesco Sandwich or Freezer bags you can write on for small stuff - bigger bits - tie-on tags. Label absolutely everything as you will forget where that little bit came from and get the "I wonder where this goes?" syndrome. I have just rebuilt an AT and it is suprising how many parts look similar but are slightly different.
Box stuff with its near relations - front brakes/calipers/ master cylinder etc.. Rear mudguard/light/rack etc.. This saves you rummaging through all the boxes looking for something that has been thrown in the nearest crate.
Clean everything when you dismantle it then you can really tell whether it is beyond use before you try putting it back together.
Photograph everything from different angles - digital camera makes this so easy as you can take hundreds of shots.
Repair the wiring harness/connectors with it off the bike - this is so much easier for re-taping it etc..

Started my strip down and rebuild in mid June and taxed the bike today (whoo hoo) - thats with a 4 week break for holidays and lack of enthusiasm first week back. This was taking things at a steady pace with the occasional delay waiting for bits to arrive - so a Winter rebuild could allow you to spread the cost over a longer period of time - which helps!!

I will probably post up all my pics and an article soon with all the various costs and problems encountered.

Good Luck!
 

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BlindPugh said:
I will probably post up all my pics and an article soon with all the various costs and problems encountered.
Yeah great Pugh, look forward to seeing this!

Also take a look at the rebuild of an RD03 courtesy of Paul Hodson (Shiny Bits) in the gallery, this goes from absolutely mingin through to first class rebuild :shock:
 

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All great advice and look forward to any pics and probs as you say!

For a learning non-techy like myself would a Haynes manual be sufficient for jobs like this or is there a more comprehensive honda service manual available that you know of?
 

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Haynes is a good start - the Honda manual assumes that the person is familiar with dismantling stuff so just gives the basic information like "remove bolt securing etc.." Haynes tends to be more "strip all these items first then remove bolt etc..." Since all this Health and Safety malarkey came along it also tends to be a bit - " don't try this at home..."
Which I promptly ignore and dive in --- hours of cursing later I usually agree with them.
The Honda OE manual + the parts fiche is a better start and if you are mechanically challenged get the Haynes book too.
 
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