Honda XRV Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been recommended to the forum from someone on the VFR forum:thumbup:
SWMBO and I have two Viffer 750s and one really ought to go... and we fancy a V-2, most likely a TA 'cos it's more managable for Mrs Sock, though her legs are plenty long enough:rolleyes:.
Anything we should look out for? I favour older carb bikes, which one to go for?
 

·
***** Newbie
Joined
·
24 Posts
I went from a '96 VFR750 to a Transalp 700 and have never looked back.

I mainly use it for commuting to work and weekend trips away marshalling at race meetings fully loaded with all my camping gear.

I find it more comfortable over long distances and better on fuel. No doubt the servicing will be cheaper too!

The punchy engine is not too much different from the VFR, appart from the top end. The vibration is a lot less than I expected it to be coming from a V4 to a V2

Cornering feels very different on the TA compared to the VFR, which is the only thing I miss.

Of course it all depends on what you use the bike for but I feel that I made a good choice.

The bike feels soild and quality appart from a few cheap fasterners and the well documented spokes.

The Misses says that she feels a lot more stable on the back with the wider but shorter seat.
 

·
Womble
Joined
·
180 Posts
I went from a 2000 VFR 800 to a 2008 XL700 TransAlp.

Even with the obvious differences in seat height and power delivery I am totally happy with the TA [excepting the general decline in Honda build quality, but that's not a fault of the bike's design]. Where the VFR would get to 60mph in 5-ish seconds the TA takes a while longer and is well out of breath long before the 150 mph quoted top speed of the VFR. Having said that in normal riding I wouldn't say it was a drawback no-one really does that and in normal traffic the TA is quick enough.

The more upright riding position of the TA is better suited to my increasing years and daily commute. Being a short legged person I have the low seat, and hiding behind the touring screen makes the bike better than the VFR for the winter commute - those hand guards are worth their weight in gold!

On the down side, the 19" front wheel takes a bit of getting used to, especially with the OEM Bridgestone Trailwings [oft referred to here as Deathwings] but I've just replaced mine with Michelin Anakees and am having to re-learn how the bike handles as the response is totally different. One of the other guys here has made the same comment about Metzeler Tourances so my view is that the OEM tyres are awful..!

Fuel consumption is better than my VFR 800 but not by as much as I expected, but you lose a lot of the streamlining by sitting upright....

Unlike Agent Orange I very rarely took the bike marshalling, but then I rarely travelled beyond Brands Hatch to get my motorsport fix..! Mine is a commuter tool, and the higher and wider bars and hand guards present their own challenges when squeezing between the delivery van and the taxi, but you get used to that quickly.

As for which one to go for, that is probably as much a personal preference as anything else. The 700 is the newest and most tech-stuffed bike of the series. Looks are a personal thing, but I favour the looks of the 700 over that of the earlier ones. As for reliability, it's too early for the to tell. but there are plenty of others here who could comment on earlier models.

Hope that helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,472 Posts
Went from a 98 vfr, last of the carbs, to the 08 TA700.

Daily use is way better fun, much more enjoyable to ride around the small roads of Norfolk and easily better for commuting.

Just got back from France covering over 3200 miles - approx 1200 were done in a rush on toll roads which are the only place I missed the VFR however thats if I wanted to hit crazy speeds, which I didnt so still the TA wins.

I love the V4 engine and its this I miss the most but I honestly havent had as much fun on a bike in years (once I got rid of the OEM tyres) - true riding experience and the brakes work too.... VFR Fi never got better I hear.

And you can experience the world of off roads/green lanes if you really want to - try the Pyrenees for the best of this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Mnay thanks Agent Tangerine, Wellington and Farty;)
All very encouraging. We have 750 carb bikes, an FP and an FV, will likely keep the latter, so can get the odd fix of speed, though TBH only do 90 on the motorway and 70-85 tops on A roads.
The FP bounces round corners too with its elderly rear shock:rolleyes:
Age is a consideration, mine not only the bike, as my knees don't like beeing bent up for long periods:( Filtering thu' the M6 car park is tight enough with the narrowish VFR bars, might have to slow down:rolleyes:
Might try either selling the FP to my bruv in law or finding a swap on this or the VFR site, so I'm restricted financially to a late 90's 650 I think?
:thumbup: cheers for excellent responses guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
riding a 96 t/a now . my previous motor was a 97 750fv . different tools altogether . t/a better for shorter trips but really miss my viffer . did 20k on her in a year and the t/a is no match for distance . viffer was heavy on my elbows though . horses for courses i guess but if a viffer came up at the right money i'd snap it up :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,716 Posts
I went from an early '90s 600 Alp (owned 4 yrs) to an early pro-arm VFR750 & was bored stupid after 8 months & sold it. After looking at all kinds of bikes I went for a '95 Alp & loved it - till I fancied a change & sold it 4 yrs on..... DOH!
Tried other stuff & back onto a 650 Alp this time,had it 4 yrs & no plans to change as I can see a pattern emerging!

An Alp will do everything the VFR can but the VFR won't do everything that the Alp will.
To me, the only thing that's better about the VFR is fast A road work & long, high speed motorway stuff, but try hustling one down a tight, twisty, bumpy country road :confused:

Like everything, it depends what you want out of a bike, try one & see.

Phil
 

·
SENSAI
Joined
·
91 Posts
it depends on your preference.both brilliant bikes,bullet proof and great work horses.i had both an @t and a ta and i have to say the ta is a better al rounder although i wouldnt knock [email protected] is a classic and i loved it...take both for a test ride and see how you feel.depending on the @t's year it could be heavier or around the same weight as the ta.the ta is a gravity flow where as the @t has a fuel pump and they do tend to be their weak point but then again they have more poke.
i ride my ta everywhere and she'll do whatever i ask.....let me know how you get on....either way you get a good one and you wont look back:thumbright:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
While trying to locate the tyres survey because one of the Africa Twins needs a new rear I found this thread. Some years ago I bought an AT (it was too good a deal to pass) to add to my 1997 VFR750.

I've enjoyed the AT enormously so much I now own two (I operate from two different bases - that's my excuse) but still reckon the VFR (I have two of them now as well - same lame excuse, as above) is a far superior machine if there's any distance to be covered.

The VFR is faster, far better handling, far better brakes, far cheaper to buy, easier on petrol and more comfortable. While the AT's engine is fine, the VFR's is a jewel and sounds lovely too.

I live in Ireland and our roads can be pretty poor but, unless there's grass up the centre, I'd prefer to tackle them on the VFR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Haven't done it, and am likely to keep the VFR until funds improve:(
Thanks for the feedback- I'm loving my Viffer enough to spemd some money on the suspension, £100 for a tweak of the rear shock is cheaper than selling and buying summat else.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I forgot to mention also that the build quality, materials and finish on the VFR are all better than on an AT. Mind you, I gather the earlier ATs are better in that department.

Furthermore the AT has spoked wheels which, while all very proper looking, present problems both in terms of maintaining the wheel (spokes breaking and rim corrosion) and the fact you must use inner tubes making punctures harder to fix and blow-outs far more likely.

Gawd, this is probably considered heresy on this particular forum.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top