Honda XRV Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all

My chain on the baby vara is getting slightly slack. Problem is that I don;t have a manual for it to see how to tighten it.

Someone told me that I loosen the nut on the right side (if looking from behind) then tighten the nuts at the end of each swing arm equally. Then tighten up the big nut on the right again.

Is this correct? Just confused as there is the same size nut on the left hand side and wouldn't this need to be loosened too in order for the wheel to move?

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Craigypops
Joined
·
6,747 Posts
hmmm been a while since i had my vara, i'm sure someone will be along shortly to give excellent advice but for now what you could do is goto your loacal bike shop and ask for them to tighten it and watch to see how they do it, it costs £3 so it's nowt really.

Your manual would tell you also what torque to tighten the nut back up (ive actually knackered mine bfore through overtightening).

Usually when you slacken the wheel (on side stand not centre) there will be two bolts either side that move your wheel back slightly when turned, these need to be turned the same i.e. one half turn on one then the other. Then get someone the same size as you to sit on the bike so you can see the tension... like i said, best to watch someone do it then you knw how but i'm a mechanical numpty so don't listen to me :D



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,768 Posts
Hi all

My chain on the baby vara is getting slightly slack. Problem is that I don;t have a manual for it to see how to tighten it.

Someone told me that I loosen the nut on the right side (if looking from behind) then tighten the nuts at the end of each swing arm equally. Then tighten up the big nut on the right again.

Is this correct? Just confused as there is the same size nut on the left hand side and wouldn't this need to be loosened too in order for the wheel to move?

Thanks in advance.
The rear wheel is held on by a spindle, the nut could be on either side or both, depending on spindle type. If you loosen one the other will be loose.
Then you loosen the lock nuts and move the rear wheel back with the rear bolts until the chain is the correct tension, then just tighten up all the locknuts and spindle.
 

·
yet another Dave
Joined
·
2,854 Posts
you need access to a manual either yours or someone elses, to get the correct torque figure for the wheel spindle and the correct chain slackness. do haynes do a manual for the 125? that would be well worth £16. oh and a torque wrench would be handy and is a good investment too. i only use the cheapo wrench from argos, tested it at work and its accurate. i know jobs get expensive if you have to buy the tools first, but you only buy them once and will save money in the end doing them yourself.
my big varadero has no locknuts on the chain adjusters, dont know about the babydero but apart from that its pretty much as stumpyfingers describes. turn the adjusters a flat at a time each side to keep your wheel aligned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks

Haynes dont do a manual. Wish they did though as would like to do more things myself as opposed to taking it to garage.
 

·
Bling Tastic Transalp
Joined
·
1,362 Posts
The Vara 125 chain adjustment procedure is the same as for a TA 650 .

But the slack is.. 25-35mm on bottom chain run between the sprockets.
and the torque for the axle nut is 88Nm


I searched for *Vara 125 manual* in google , and found the info in the Vara Forum , topic called *125 Manual* . might be worth looking as there is lots of info there , especially in the second to last post..
 

·
Truffle shuffle king
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
The Vara 125 chain adjustment procedure is the same as for a TA 650 .

But the slack is.. 25-35mm on bottom chain run between the sprockets.
and the torque for the axle nut is 88Nm


I searched for *Vara 125 manual* in google , and found the info in the Vara Forum , topic called *125 Manual* . might be worth looking as there is lots of info there , especially in the second to last post..
Would agree with the free play. Whether it was my weight or how I rode it I found I needed to adjust it every 400 miles or so. I could tell when it was ready as the gear change became more "clonky"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,768 Posts
You could pay slightly more and get a genuine Honda Workshop manual, then you will know it has less typos.
 

·
The Angry Pasty Muncher
Joined
·
6,170 Posts
You could pay slightly more and get a genuine Honda Workshop manual, then you will know it has less typos.

David silver sells genuine Honda copies for £11 got one for my XR400 much better than the crap you get with a haynes manual which normally says "Consult dealer" to the bit of info that you actually need
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,275 Posts
just tightened my chain on baby vara, i have also noticed the same problem of having to re-tighten it frequently.
after read about "LORD VADERS" drive shaft it got me thinking about the geometry involved in the swing arm and chain. as the swing arm and chain pivot in different places as you apply more load the chain will become tighter. as my son who also rides the bike is somewhat heavier than me i thought this could be an issue. as an experiment i got him to sit on the bike after setting the chain tension and sure enough the chain went tight as you can imagine hitting any pot holes will stretch the chain more.
conclusion, don't set the chain tension when the bike is on its side stand and also check it with your full weight pressing down on the suspension.
i have also suggested my son goes on a diet and tries to avoid pot holes and sleeping policemen:D:D:D to prolong the life of the chain.
 

·
Truffle shuffle king
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
just tightened my chain on baby vara, i have also noticed the same problem of having to re-tighten it frequently.
after read about "LORD VADERS" drive shaft it got me thinking about the geometry involved in the swing arm and chain. as the swing arm and chain pivot in different places as you apply more load the chain will become tighter. as my son who also rides the bike is somewhat heavier than me i thought this could be an issue. as an experiment i got him to sit on the bike after setting the chain tension and sure enough the chain went tight as you can imagine hitting any pot holes will stretch the chain more.
conclusion, don't set the chain tension when the bike is on its side stand and also check it with your full weight pressing down on the suspension.
i have also suggested my son goes on a diet and tries to avoid pot holes and sleeping policemen:D:D:D to prolong the life of the chain.


Agree with the logic as I tried similar when I had the baby vara. At 17 stone dry then the swing arm is in a different position with me on that a 10 stoner. I had my son measuring the slack with me on it and it was significantly different.
If you also compare the 'weight' of the chain on the baby and 1litre there is a big difference and as suh the baby would stretch easier.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
2,701 Posts
just tightened my chain on baby vara, i have also noticed the same problem of having to re-tighten it frequently.
after read about "LORD VADERS" drive shaft it got me thinking about the geometry involved in the swing arm and chain. as the swing arm and chain pivot in different places as you apply more load the chain will become tighter. as my son who also rides the bike is somewhat heavier than me i thought this could be an issue. as an experiment i got him to sit on the bike after setting the chain tension and sure enough the chain went tight as you can imagine hitting any pot holes will stretch the chain more.
conclusion, don't set the chain tension when the bike is on its side stand and also check it with your full weight pressing down on the suspension.
i have also suggested my son goes on a diet and tries to avoid pot holes and sleeping policemen:D:D:D to prolong the life of the chain.
If the chain goes tight with weight on the bike you are setting it too tight. It will cause the chain to stretch and may also damage the gearbox shaft bearing.
 

·
yet another Dave
Joined
·
2,854 Posts
yes it would be perfect if the front sprocket and swingarm turned on the same axis but that has eluded designers so far, for example how would you drive the sprocket as it usually goes on the output shaft from the engine?
you would think it would be easier for a shaft drive designer but clearly they have their problems too.
they do wear out but i think a chain and sprockets system is still a pretty good solution.

cant believe haynes dont do a manual for the 125vara? it must be one of the most popular 125s. it doesnt make sense, you can still get a manual for a 1969 AP50 but they never did one for the whole XT600 family although it was virtually unchanged for 20yrs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,275 Posts
If the chain goes tight with weight on the bike you are setting it too tight. It will cause the chain to stretch and may also damage the gearbox shaft bearing.
the problem seems to be when the bike is on the side stand the suspension is almost stretched and not compressed. even setting it too the book according to saint honda when fully loaded the chain still goes tight.

cant believe haynes dont do a manual for the 125vara?
i contacted haynes about 10 months ago about a manual, the reply stated "we donnot and have no plans to produce a manual"
i purchased a genuine honda one from local dealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,768 Posts
the problem seems to be when the bike is on the side stand the suspension is almost stretched and not compressed. Even setting it too the book according to saint Honda when fully loaded the chain still goes tight.



i contacted Haynes about 10 months ago about a manual, the reply stated "we donnot and have no plans to produce a manual"
i purchased a genuine Honda one from local dealer.
It is always best to get a genuine workshop manual as Grammar aside it is a lot more relevant to the bike you have than the generic Haynes.
 

·
The Angry Pasty Muncher
Joined
·
6,170 Posts
yes it would be perfect if the front sprocket and swingarm turned on the same axis but that has eluded designers so far, for example how would you drive the sprocket as it usually goes on the output shaft from the engine?
you would think it would be easier for a shaft drive designer but clearly they have their problems too.
.
Not true Yamaha have done it on some offroad bikes for trial and error and the current BMW450 enduro bike have it on same axis to you constantly have correct chain tension.Only down side they think it would take an experienced mechanic about 3/4 hr - 1hr to change the front sprocket. Chains should always be tensioned up with the bike loaded
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top