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Discussion Starter #1
I have some time on my hands and this summer, both my Alp and my @rse will be put to the test as I ride from tallinn to Eastern France to meet my dad for a good old road trip.

So I want to give the TA a good once over. Check the condition of the this and that, and grease this bolt or that.

However, I know that there are some instances where greasing a bolt before re-torquing it is less advised.

Typically, I would smear some copper-grease or anti corrosion grease on a thread on all nuts/bolts I remove before re-tightening.

Do members have any pointers based on principle or experience about what I should use and where?

Thoughts?
 

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How much is the fish?
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I put copper grease on every bolt/nut I remove before refitting them. I can' see it doing any harm and it makes it much easier to remove next time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I put copper grease on every bolt/nut I remove before refitting them. I can' see it doing any harm and it makes it much easier to remove next time.
This is my tendency, too.

However, to give an example, on my old BMW 1150GS the bolts used to secure the rear wheel to the FD allegedly weren't to be greased.

Basically, are there any exceptions to "grease and torque" on a TA600?

If not, I'll just go ahead with my review!
 

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The Angry Pasty Muncher
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I put copper grease on every bolt/nut I remove before refitting them. I can' see it doing any harm and it makes it much easier to remove next time.
not a good idea on brake caliper mounting bolts, try loctite nextime
 

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yet another Dave
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on the aircraft we never lube a bolt to be torqued up unless specifically told to do so or have the correct dry/wet torque settings.
threads work by friction, a lubed bolt will spin round further for the same torque, so actually be tighter than specified. if you want to protect the threads from corrosion use loctite as already mentioned or grease/ACF50 it after doing it up.
 

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Discussion Starter #6

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yet another Dave
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perhaps theres some confusion between the thread on a bolt, and the shank, or body(the unthreaded bit) or 'grip' if youre american, although strictly speaking grip is the length of the shank. put some grease on the shank by all means, in fact its a good idea, a thin smear of copperslip on the shank will make it a lot easier to take out in the future. but not on the thread, as was said in your original post

clear as mud.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Got it!


  • Undo bolt
  • Re-insert bolt
  • Tighten bolt with torque wrench
  • Apply pork dripping to you socket set
  • Put it all away in the toolbox.
Yes?
 

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i believe you need to assess what the individual bolt is used for
1
if the torque is critical don't grease the thread but grease the shank (head bolts )
2 never grease nylock nuts
3 for less critical bolts grease the whole bolt, thread and shank. (rack fixings, fairing fixings.
4 any threads which protrude put a dob of grease on the exposed thread (corrosion on exposed threads can ruin your nuts :))

well thats what i do
 

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yet another Dave
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Got it!


  • Undo bolt
  • Re-insert bolt
  • Tighten bolt with torque wrench
  • Apply pork dripping to you socket set
  • Put it all away in the toolbox.
Yes?
it would work but you'll have all the neighbourhood dogs chasing your bike:grin:
 

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The Angry Pasty Muncher
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Oookaaaayy..... Now I'm confused:dontknow:

Simple grease reduces friction and seizure but it on your caliper mounting bolts at some point the caliper is liable to drop off. Loctite acts like glue when it sets and bonds the bolt in place but can easily be removed with a bit of force or heat if it's high strength, the heat will just turn it semi liquid again
 

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i believe you need to assess what the individual bolt is used for
1
if the torque is critical don't grease the thread but grease the shank (head bolts )
2 never grease nylock nuts
3 for less critical bolts grease the whole bolt, thread and shank. (rack fixings, fairing fixings.
4 any threads which protrude put a dob of grease on the exposed thread (corrosion on exposed threads can ruin your nuts :))

well thats what i do
IMO, If it's not important, grease and torque. If it is, blue loctite and torque. If it's in the engine, engine oil and torque.

I am not responsible for any pain, death or injury that may result from following this advice.
 
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